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Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
20.07.2017
Professor John Spencer's Lab to carry out vital skin cancer research thanks to new grant
Professor John Spencer’s Lab to carry out vital skin cancer research thanks to new grant
Professor John Spencer's Lab to carry out vital skin cancer research thanks to new grant The Spencer Lab , in the University's Chemistry Department, is to carry out vital research into skin cancer thanks to a new grant from The Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).
Life Sciences - Chemistry
20.07.2017
Imperial academic to lead UK's new national science hub
Imperial academic to lead UK’s new national science hub
An Imperial chemical engineer will lead a new national centre of excellence in technology development and innovation.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
20.07.2017
One in three cases of dementia could be prevented by targeting risk factors from childhood onwards
One in three cases of dementia could be prevented by targeting risk factors from childhood onwards
One in three cases of dementia could potentially be prevented if brain health is improved throughout life by targeting nine risk factors, including continuing education in early life, reducing hearing loss in mid-life, and reducing smoking in later life.
Physics/Materials Science - Life Sciences
19.07.2017
Multi-million-pound investment in a regional cryo-electron microscopy facility
A state-of-the-art Midlands regional cryo-electron microscopy (Cryo-EM) facility has been established, following a successful bid by the Universities of Warwick, Nottingham and Birmingham, led by the University of Leicester.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
19.07.2017
UOFG TO LEAD A NEW £5M SCOTTISH MACROMOLECULAR IMAGING CENTRE
Scientists from the University of Glasgow have been successful in securing more than £5 million of funding to create an innovative structural biology centre in Scotland.‌‌ The Scottish Macro
Life Sciences - Environment/Sustainable Development
19.07.2017
Growing better trees faster
A new research collaboration could significantly increase the quality and economic productivity of one of the UK's largest crop outputs, Sitka spruce conifer trees.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
19.07.2017
Silk
Silk "micrococoons" could be used in biotechnology and medicine
Researchers have manufactured microscopic versions of the cocoons spun by silkworms, which could be used to store sensitive proteins and other molecules for a wide range of uses.
Life Sciences - Philosophy
19.07.2017
Producing Human-animal hybrid eggs for research not unethical
Scientists should not be prevented from creating human-animal chimeras to produce human eggs for research, according to Dr César Palacios-González , Centre of Medical Law and Ethics in The Dickson Poon School of Law at King's. Writing in the journal Reproductive BioMedicine Online today he examines four of the ethical arguments used against the creation of these chimeras to produce human eggs for research and finds that none of these arguments are ethically strong enough for it to be immoral to use this technique.
Life Sciences - Administration/Government
18.07.2017
Young scientists bring their anti-malaria invention to Imperial
Young scientists bring their anti-malaria invention to Imperial
Four students who invented a mosquito repellent device spent the day with Imperial malaria researchers finding out about the latest science.
Life Sciences
18.07.2017
Conscious machines' Not unless they are alive, says expert in
Conscious machines’ Not unless they are alive, says expert in "mind-scrambling" TED talk
Conscious machines' Not unless they are alive, says expert in "mind-scrambling" TED talk Our conscious experiences of the world have more to do with being alive than being intelligent, argues a leadi
Life Sciences - Environment/Sustainable Development
18.07.2017
New light on the secret life of badgers
Urgent action is needed to protect marine life, with more than 60 per cent of the world's oceans lacking effective conservation measures, according to new Oxford University study.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
18.07.2017
Research in the emergency room helps predict organ failure in critically injured patients
Research in the emergency room helps predict organ failure in critically injured patients
Testing blood samples within the first two hours of injury could help predict which critically injured patients are more likely to develop multiple organ failure, according to an early study led by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).  The finding that there is a specific immune response to trauma shortly after injury could also help with the development of new therapies.
Event - Life Sciences
18.07.2017
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
18.07.2017
Novel therapeutic approach against genetic forms of Schizophrenia
Research led by the University of Glasgow has made a breakthrough in developing a possible future treatment of schizophrenia and related psychiatric conditions. Studies currently show that people with a hereditary form of schizophrenia, or a subset of the general schizophrenic population, are deficient in the brain protein DISC1, an important multi-function ‘scaffolding' protein vital to key brain functions.
Life Sciences - Computer Science/Telecom
18.07.2017
DIY lab technique to revolutionise training for neuroscientists
DIY lab technique to revolutionise training for neuroscientists
DIY lab technique to revolutionise training for neuroscientists A team of international researchers have come up with an inexpensive way to self-manufacture lab equipment, which could revolutionise the way neuroscientists across the world are trained.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
17.07.2017
The next study I work on could help revolutionise how we treat a certain disease.
The next study I work on could help revolutionise how we treat a certain disease."
?The next study I work on could help revolutionise how we treat a certain disease." “The brain is an incredible organ, there is so much we don't know about it.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
17.07.2017
Bacteria passed between generations benefit you more than others
When bacteria are passed vertically, straight from mother to offspring, they tend to be much better for their hosts than if they are transmitted via the environment (horizontally). e.g. a light-producing bacteria that helps the squid defend against predators. Image credit: C. Frazee, and contributed by M. McFall-Ngai Bacteria passed straight to children have more healthcare benefits than if they are transmitted via the surrounding environment, new Oxford University research reveals.
Life Sciences - Environment/Sustainable Development
17.07.2017
Why T. Rex and elephants lumber behind cheetahs
Why T. Rex and elephants lumber behind cheetahs
Scientists have discovered why the largest animals are not the fastest, and have used a model to predict the speed of extinct animals like dinosaurs. As animals get larger, they get faster - but only up to a point. A rabbit could beat a mouse in a race, just as a mouse could beat a beetle. But nothing beats a cheetah on land, even though there are plenty of larger animals like elephants.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
17.07.2017
More participants needed to complete UK-led Alzheimer's disease drug trial
More participants needed to complete UK-led Alzheimer’s disease drug trial
People with Alzheimer's disease are already helping with a ground-breaking government-funded trial led by academics from the Universities of Bristol, Cambridge, Queen's University Belfast and Univers
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
17.07.2017
Imperial to help develop blast injury hub for conflict survivors in Sri Lanka
Imperial to help develop blast injury hub for conflict survivors in Sri Lanka
A 1.9 million GBP project will develop new methods for treating victims who have lost or injured limbs as a consequence of the conflict in Sri Lanka.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
17.07.2017
’Good’ bacteria passed between generations benefit you more
When bacteria are passed vertically, straight from mother to offspring, they tend to be much better for their hosts than if they are transmitted via the environment (horizontally). e.g. a light-producing bacteria that helps the squid defend against predators. Image credit: C. Frazee, and contributed by M. McFall-Ngai Bacteria passed straight to children have more healthcare benefits than if they are transmitted via the surrounding environment, new Oxford University research reveals.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
17.07.2017
Engage-HD
Mae canlyniadau o Ganolfan Treialon Ymchwil Prifysgol Caerdydd yn awgrymu y gallai cleifion sydd â chlefyd Huntingdon (HD) aros yn weithredol am gyfnod hirach os ydyn nhw'n dilyn rhaglenni ymarfer sydd wedi'u cynllunio'n dda a'u cefnogi'n broffesiynol.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
14.07.2017
Snip, snip, cure: correcting defects in the genetic blueprint
Snip, snip, cure: correcting defects in the genetic blueprint
Gene editing using ‘molecular scissors' that snip out and replace faulty DNA could provide an almost unimaginable future for some patients: a complete cure.
Life Sciences - Careers/Employment
14.07.2017
Honorary degree for plant pioneer
World leading botanist and pioneer of plant cell research, Professor Edward Cocking has been awarded an honorary Doctor of Science degree from the University of Nottingham in recognition of his achievements in the field of botanical research.
Life Sciences - Careers/Employment
13.07.2017
World’s largest Biology Olympiad comes to Coventry this summer
Over 260 young biologists from 68 countries will be coming to the University of Warwick to take part in this year's International Biology Olympiad The International Biology Olympiad (IBO), which take
Life Sciences
13.07.2017
Scientists to compare insects visiting allotments in Brighton & India
Scientists to compare insects visiting allotments in Brighton & India
Scientists to compare insects visiting allotments in Brighton & India Scientists at the University of Sussex are to compare allotments in Brighton and India in a bid to learn more about the insects that pollinate our food.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
11.07.2017
The most detailed scan of the wiring of the human brain
An incredible new film shows the human brain in unrivalled detail, thanks to a partnership between Cardiff University and Siemens Healthineers. BBC Medical Correspondent Fergus Walsh's brain was scanned at Cardiff University Brain Research Imaging Centre (CUBRIC) using Europe's most powerful MRI scanner - the Magnetom Skyra Connectom 3T.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
11.07.2017
Breath of life: how your risk of heart disease may stem back to your time in the womb
Breath of life: how your risk of heart disease may stem back to your time in the womb
Smoking, lack of exercise, bad diet and our genes are all well-known risk factors for heart disease, cancer and diabetes.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
11.07.2017
Breath of life: how your risk of heart disease stems back to your time in the womb
Breath of life: how your risk of heart disease stems back to your time in the womb
Smoking, lack of exercise, bad diet and our genes are all well-known risk factors for heart disease, cancer and diabetes.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
10.07.2017
Life Sciences - Environment/Sustainable Development
10.07.2017
Big, shape-shifting animals from the dawn of time
Big, shape-shifting animals from the dawn of time
Major changes in the chemical composition of the world's oceans enabled the first large organisms - possibly some of the earliest animals - to exist and thrive more than half a billion years ago, marking the point when conditions on Earth changed and animals began to take over the world.  We wanted to know why these large organisms appeared at this particular point in Earth's history.
Administration/Government - Life Sciences
10.07.2017
Major funding for new crop sciences research centre that will be ‘centrepiece' of industrial collaboration
Major funding for new crop sciences research centre that will be ‘centrepiece’ of industrial collaboration
Over £30m has been announced for a new Cambridge Centre for Crop Science that will focus on linking with farming and food industries to translate research into real world impact.
Veterinary Science - Life Sciences
10.07.2017
How can diagnostics deliver a more effective use of antibiotics in animals?
How can diagnostics deliver a more effective use of antibiotics in animals?
Are there better ways to diagnose animals in need of antibiotics on livestock farms' How will farmers and veterinarians use novel diagnostics in the fight against animal disease?
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
10.07.2017
Global teamwork brings low-cost test for Weil's disease a step closer
Global teamwork brings low-cost test for Weil’s disease a step closer
An on-the-spot, low-cost diagnostic test for leptospirosis (Weil's disease), a bacterial infection recognised as a neglected disease by the World Health Organization, could save lives in developing co
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
09.07.2017
Studies begin on first Huntington's disease sheep imported to UK
Studies begin on first Huntington’s disease sheep imported to UK
Scientists at the University of Cambridge will this week begin studying sheep that have been genetically modified to carry the mutation that causes Huntington's disease. The sheep are believed to be the first Merinos to have been imported into the UK from Australia for about 50 years. Even though we've known for decades now exactly which genetic mutation causes Huntington's disease, we're arguably still no nearer a cure - the best we can do is manage the symptoms Jenny Morton Huntington's disease affects more than 6,700 people in the UK.
Life Sciences
07.07.2017
Drinkers will go cuckoo for new beers
Beer-lovers in Nottingham and Derby will be able to sample two exciting new brews and get the first taste of a new hop variety never used before commercially thanks to a brewing project run by the University of Nottingham.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
07.07.2017
Imperial academic talks about studying museum specimens of Chinese bound feet
Imperial academic talks about studying museum specimens of Chinese bound feet
An Imperial academic talks about her recent work in analysing the internal structure of bound-feet museum artefacts.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
07.07.2017
PROFESSOR TESSA HOLYOAKE PRESENTED WITH ROYAL MEDAL BY THE QUEEN
World-leading Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia (CML) doctor, Professor Tessa Holyoake has been awarded a Royal Society of Edinburgh (RSE) Royal Medal by Her Majesty the Queen today (Friday 7 July 2017).
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
06.07.2017
Thousands donated to cancer research at the University of Warwick
Cancer research in the region has received a boost thanks to the former Lord Mayor of Coventry Cllr Lindsley Harvard.
Business/Economics - Life Sciences
06.07.2017
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
05.07.2017
Bacteria collaborate to propel the ocean ‘engine’
Microbiological interactions that keep the ‘engine' of the ocean running are revealed fully for first time by University of Warwick researchers Two abundant types of microorganism in the ocean - phototrophic and heterotrophic bacteria - collaborate to recycle carbon from the atmosphere into energy to feed the ecosystem The discovery will help scientists protect the oceans and better predict how seas will react to climate change Essential microbiological interactions that keep our oceans stable have been fully revealed for the first time, by researchers at the University of Warwick.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
05.07.2017
Imperial partners with AstraZeneca to fund basic research
Imperial partners with AstraZeneca to fund basic research
Imperial College London is partnering with AstraZeneca to lay the foundations for new medical breakthroughs and publications in leading journals.
Life Sciences
05.07.2017
Flowers' genome duplication contributes to their spectacular diversity
Flowers’ genome duplication contributes to their spectacular diversity
Scientists at the University of Bristol have shed new light on the evolution of flowers in research published today in the Royal Society journal Proceedings B. The evolution of plants has been punctuated by major innovations, none more striking among living plants than the flower.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
04.07.2017
The self-defence force awakens
The self-defence force awakens
Our immune systems are meant to keep us healthy, but sometimes they turn their fire on us, with devastating results.
Life Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
04.07.2017
Quantum sensors herald new generation of wearable brain imaging systems
Scientists at the University of Nottingham are working with University College London (UCL) on a five year project which has the potential to revolutionise the world of human brain imaging. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a technique for mapping brain activity - it measures the magnetic fields generated by electrical currents that occur naturally in the brain.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
04.07.2017
Imperial centre for research on bacterial infection receives funding boost
Imperial centre for research on bacterial infection receives funding boost
An Imperial centre dedicated to the study of disease-causing bacteria has secured significant new funding to continue its work on to 2022.
Chemistry - Life Sciences
04.07.2017
Imperial academic discusses his work on algae fuel factories
Imperial academic discusses his work on algae fuel factories
An Imperial engineer talks about his work in 'coaxing' algae into manufacturing and excreting biofuels on an industrial scale.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
03.07.2017
Artificial bile ducts grown in lab and transplanted into mice could help treat liver disease in children
Artificial bile ducts grown in lab and transplanted into mice could help treat liver disease in children
Cambridge scientists have developed a new method for growing and transplanting artificial bile ducts that could in future be used to help treat liver disease in children, reducing the need for liver transplantation.  Our work has the potential to transform the treatment of bile duct disorders Ludovic Vallier In research published , the researchers grew 3D cellular structure which, once transplanted into mice, developed into normal, functioning bile ducts.
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