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Medicine/Pharmacology - Chemistry
22.02.2018
Carbon monoxide detection in the body could lead to rapid disease diagnostics
A quick and reliable way to detect levels of carbon monoxide in the body could allow clinicians to diagnose disease. Carbon monoxide is normally considered in terms of the amount of damage it can cause us, but a team of scientists at Imperial College London and the Polytechnic University of Valencia have been looking at the other biological roles it can play.
Chemistry
16.02.2018
New sensor tech for commercial Lithium-ion batteries finds they can be charged 5 times faster
Researchers at WMG at the University of Warwick have developed a new direct, precise test of Lithium-ion batteries' internal temperatures and the electrodes potentials and found that the batteries can be safely charged up to five times faster than the current recommended charging limits.
Chemistry - Physics/Materials Science
01.02.2018
Chemistry - Innovation/Technology
23.01.2018
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
23.01.2018
Researchers part of multi-million pound battery project
Researchers part of multi-million pound battery project
Lancaster University researchers are part of a team of the UK's top battery experts working to support the development of next generation batteries.
Chemistry - Environment/Sustainable Development
22.01.2018
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
19.01.2018
Chemistry - Life Sciences
17.01.2018
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
09.01.2018
Smart sensor could revolutionise crime and terrorism prevention
A newly developed smart sensor which can recognise a vast range of reactive surfaces, the technology such as acetone,could be used to protect society from crime and terrorism.
Chemistry - Physics/Materials Science
08.01.2018
New catalyst for making fuels from shale gas
New catalyst for making fuels from shale gas
Methane in shale gas can be turned into hydrocarbon fuels using an innovative platinum and copper alloy catalyst, according to new research led by UCL and Tufts University. Platinum or nickel are known to break the carbon-hydrogen bonds in methane found in shale gas to make hydrocarbon fuels and other useful chemicals.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Chemistry
03.01.2018
Chemistry - Agronomy/Food Science
18.12.2017
Risk of
Risk of "dirty" turkey after Brexit if UK strikes a US trade deal
Risk of "dirty" turkey after Brexit if UK strikes a US trade deal Consumers could be eating “dirty” chlorinated turkey at Christmas if the UK agrees a post-Brexit trade deal with the USA, according to a new briefing paper by leading food policy experts. The team - from the University of Sussex, Cardiff University and City, University of London - found US poultry, washed in up to four chemical disinfectants, does not meet EU safety standards.
Chemistry - Agronomy/Food Science
18.12.2017
Risk of "dirty" turkey after Brexit if UK strikes a US trade deal
Consumers could be eating “dirty” chlorinated turkey at Christmas if the UK agrees a post-Brexit trade deal with the USA, according to a new briefing paper by leading food policy experts. The team - from Cardiff University, the University of Sussex, and City, University of London - found US poultry, washed in up to four chemical disinfectants, does not meet EU safety standards.
Chemistry - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
15.12.2017
More electronic materials opened up with new metal-organic framework
More materials for electronic applications could be identified, thanks to the discovery of a new metal-organic framework (MOF) that displays electrical semiconduction with a record high photoresponsivity, by a global research collaboration involving the University of Warwick.
Chemistry - Physics/Materials Science
14.12.2017
Drug discovery could accelerate hugely with Machine Learning
Drug discovery could be significantly accelerated thanks to a new high precision machine-learning model, developed by an international collaboration of researchers, including the University of Warwick.
Earth Sciences - Chemistry
13.12.2017
Chemical tipping point of magma determines explosive potential of volcanoes
Chemical tipping point of magma determines explosive potential of volcanoes
Volcanic eruptions are the most spectacular expression of the processes acting in the interior of any active planet.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Chemistry
13.12.2017
Fighting for a world without asthma
Almost everyone knows someone with asthma. An international research consortium for asthma prevention, including collaborators from the Universities of Glasgow and Edinburgh, will search for novel approaches to potentially eliminate this lung disease in the world.
Chemistry - Innovation/Technology
12.12.2017
Innovation/Technology - Chemistry
06.12.2017
Scientists turn beer into fuel
Scientists turn beer into fuel
Chemists at the University of Bristol have made the first steps towards making sustainable petrol using beer as a key ingredient. It is commonly accepted that there is an urgent need for sustainable alternatives to fossil fuels for transportation to replace diesel and petrol. One of the most widely used sustainable alternatives to petrol world-wide is bioethanol - in the United States gasoline is typically sold as a blend with up to 10 percent ethanol.
Innovation/Technology - Chemistry
30.11.2017
Imperial poised to play leading role in future of 3D printing
Imperial poised to play leading role in future of 3D printing
Merging molecular science and engineering could help overcome current challenges in 3D printing to make it faster, cheaper and more consistent.
Chemistry - Physics/Materials Science
24.11.2017
Cooking fats could be affecting cloud formation
Cooking fats could be affecting cloud formation
Fats released into the atmosphere from cookers such as deep fat fryers may be enhancing the formation of clouds, which have a major cooling effect on the planet. In a Nature Communications paper, scientists demonstrated for the first time that fatty acid molecules emitted during cooking can spontaneously form complex 3D structures in atmospheric aerosol droplets.
Chemistry - Education/Continuing Education
22.11.2017
Chemistry - Life Sciences
22.11.2017
The secrets of the
The secrets of the "ideal" open plan office revealed
What makes the ideal open-plan office? Researchers at UCL have used data analysis, video observation and surveys to study how we interact at work and come up with an answer.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Chemistry
14.11.2017
Simple water test could prevent crippling bone disease
Simple water test could prevent crippling bone disease
A simple colour-changing test to detect fluoride in drinking water, devised by researchers at the University of Bath, could in the future prevent the crippling bone disease, skeletal fluorosis, in developing countries such as India and Tanzania.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
08.11.2017
Multi-million pound boost to help improve energy technology
Multi-million pound boost to help improve energy technology
A newly announced research centre will see Durham University join forces with two of the regions' other universities to help improve energy technology at an atomic level.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
07.11.2017
Nottingham celebrates 70th anniversary of the discovery of hydrogen bonds in DNA
The discovery of hydrogen bonds in DNA was made by a young Nottingham Post Graduate student, J. Michael Creeth, in what was known as the Nucleic Acid Laboratory at (the then) University College Nottingham.
Event - Chemistry
06.11.2017
Chemistry - Physics/Materials Science
31.10.2017
Are discarded cigarette butts the next high performing hydrogen storage material?
Discarded cigarette butts are a major waste disposal and environmental pollution hazard. But chemists at the University of Nottingham have discovered that cigarette butt-derived carbons have ultra-high surface area and unprecedented hydrogen storage capacity. The research was carried out by Robert Mokaya , Professor of Materials Chemistry, and Troy Scott Blankenship, an undergraduate project student, in the School of Chemistry and has been published in the academic journal Energy and Environmental Science .
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
25.10.2017
Sussex physicists have breakthrough on brittle smartphone screens
Sussex physicists have breakthrough on brittle smartphone screens
Sussex physicists have breakthrough on brittle smartphone screens Scientists at the University of Sussex may have found a solution to the long-standing problem of brittle smartphone screens. Professor Alan Dalton and his team have developed a new way to make smartphone touch screens that are cheaper, less brittle, and more environmentally friendly.
Chemistry - Life Sciences
24.10.2017
'35 years of innovation and collaboration' celebrated in Hong Kong
’35 years of innovation and collaboration’ celebrated in Hong Kong
One of Imperial's most successful alumni groups held a special gala with President Alice Gast in Hong Kong at the weekend.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
24.10.2017
Silk could be used to repair damaged spinal cords
Modified silk from Asian wild silkworms could be used in a strategy to repair damaged spinal cords, according to scientists from the universities of Aberdeen and Oxford. The researchers, working in collaboration with Oxford Biomaterials Ltd, discovered that cleaned, sterilised silk from the Antheraea pernyi (AP) silk spinner had properties well suited to spinal repair.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Chemistry
18.10.2017
Warwick grad invents revolutionary device for testing drugs
A scientist from Kazakhstan who works for Medherant Ltd - a spin-out of the University of Warwick which produces next-generation drug delivery patches - has invented a revolutionary device for testing transdermal drugs more quickly, efficiently and accurately.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Chemistry
18.10.2017
Warwick graduate invents revolutionary device for testing drugs
A scientist from Kazakhstan who works for Medherant Ltd - a spin-out of the University of Warwick which produces next-generation drug delivery patches - has invented a revolutionary device for testing transdermal drugs more quickly, efficiently and accurately.
Chemistry - Physics/Materials Science
17.10.2017
Electroplating: the birth of a single nucleus caught 'in camera'
Electroplating: the birth of a single nucleus caught ’in camera’
Electroplating, or electrodeposition, is one of the most important processes in chemistry, in which a metal cation in solution can be reduced to its elemental form by applying an electrical potential to an electrode. This enables electrical contacts to be made in integrated circuits with nanometric precision.
Administration/Government - Chemistry
04.10.2017
UCL helps shape UK's battery research strategy for electric car revolution
UCL helps shape UK’s battery research strategy for electric car revolution
UCL has been selected to be a founding partner in the creation of a new institute that will help Britain develop battery technologies that will drive the electric vehicle (EV) revolution.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
29.09.2017
Artificial cell design gets a boost with the launch of FABRICELL
Artificial cell design gets a boost with the launch of FABRICELL
FABRICELL, a joint initiative between Imperial and Kings College London, launched this month with a series of talks including a Nobel Prize winner.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
28.09.2017
Scientists create endocytosis on demand by ’hotwiring’ cells
o Scientists develop method to create endocytosis on demand o System using a chemical and light likened to 'hotwiring' a car o Discovery could be used to 'feed' cells with drugs or nanoparticles A solution to the problem of creating endocytosis on demand is being compared to 'hotwiring' a car.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Chemistry
22.09.2017
Business/Economics - Chemistry
21.09.2017
North of England generates £91 billion for UK bioeconomy
North of England generates £91 billion for UK bioeconomy
Lancaster University has contributed to a government-commissioned report which has shown that the north of England generates an annual turnover of £91 billion and employs more than 400,000 people in the regional bioeconomy.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
21.09.2017
Dino-killing asteroid sped up bird evolution
Dino-killing asteroid sped up bird evolution
Human activities could change the pace of evolution, similar to what occurred 66 million years ago when a giant asteroid wiped out the dinosaurs, leaving modern birds as their only descendants. That's one conclusion drawn by the authors of a new study just published in† Systematic Biology. Dr Daniel Field from the Milner Centre for Evolution at the University of Bath and Cornell PhD candidate Jacob Berv†suggest that the meteor-induced mass extinction (a.k.a.
Earth Sciences - Chemistry
20.09.2017
New toothpaste uses latest research to put minerals back into teeth
New toothpaste uses latest research to put minerals back into teeth
Researchers from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) have launched a new toothpaste which repairs decaying teeth using 'bioactive' glass.
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