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Medicine/Pharmacology - Chemistry
14.11.2017
Simple water test could prevent crippling bone disease
Simple water test could prevent crippling bone disease
A simple colour-changing test to detect fluoride in drinking water, devised by researchers at the University of Bath, could in the future prevent the crippling bone disease, skeletal fluorosis, in developing countries such as India and Tanzania.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
08.11.2017
Multi-million pound boost to help improve energy technology
Multi-million pound boost to help improve energy technology
A newly announced research centre will see Durham University join forces with two of the regions' other universities to help improve energy technology at an atomic level.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
07.11.2017
Nottingham celebrates 70th anniversary of the discovery of hydrogen bonds in DNA
The discovery of hydrogen bonds in DNA was made by a young Nottingham Post Graduate student, J. Michael Creeth, in what was known as the Nucleic Acid Laboratory at (the then) University College Nottingham.
Event - Chemistry
06.11.2017
Chemistry - Physics/Materials Science
31.10.2017
Are discarded cigarette butts the next high performing hydrogen storage material?
Discarded cigarette butts are a major waste disposal and environmental pollution hazard. But chemists at the University of Nottingham have discovered that cigarette butt-derived carbons have ultra-high surface area and unprecedented hydrogen storage capacity. The research was carried out by Robert Mokaya , Professor of Materials Chemistry, and Troy Scott Blankenship, an undergraduate project student, in the School of Chemistry and has been published in the academic journal Energy and Environmental Science .
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
25.10.2017
Sussex physicists have breakthrough on brittle smartphone screens
Sussex physicists have breakthrough on brittle smartphone screens
Sussex physicists have breakthrough on brittle smartphone screens Scientists at the University of Sussex may have found a solution to the long-standing problem of brittle smartphone screens. Professor Alan Dalton and his team have developed a new way to make smartphone touch screens that are cheaper, less brittle, and more environmentally friendly.
Chemistry - Life Sciences
24.10.2017
'35 years of innovation and collaboration' celebrated in Hong Kong
’35 years of innovation and collaboration’ celebrated in Hong Kong
One of Imperial's most successful alumni groups held a special gala with President Alice Gast in Hong Kong at the weekend.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
24.10.2017
Silk could be used to repair damaged spinal cords
Modified silk from Asian wild silkworms could be used in a strategy to repair damaged spinal cords, according to scientists from the universities of Aberdeen and Oxford. The researchers, working in collaboration with Oxford Biomaterials Ltd, discovered that cleaned, sterilised silk from the Antheraea pernyi (AP) silk spinner had properties well suited to spinal repair.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Chemistry
18.10.2017
Warwick grad invents revolutionary device for testing drugs
A scientist from Kazakhstan who works for Medherant Ltd - a spin-out of the University of Warwick which produces next-generation drug delivery patches - has invented a revolutionary device for testing transdermal drugs more quickly, efficiently and accurately.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Chemistry
18.10.2017
Warwick graduate invents revolutionary device for testing drugs
A scientist from Kazakhstan who works for Medherant Ltd - a spin-out of the University of Warwick which produces next-generation drug delivery patches - has invented a revolutionary device for testing transdermal drugs more quickly, efficiently and accurately.
Chemistry - Physics/Materials Science
17.10.2017
Electroplating: the birth of a single nucleus caught 'in camera'
Electroplating: the birth of a single nucleus caught ’in camera’
Electroplating, or electrodeposition, is one of the most important processes in chemistry, in which a metal cation in solution can be reduced to its elemental form by applying an electrical potential to an electrode. This enables electrical contacts to be made in integrated circuits with nanometric precision.
Administration/Government - Chemistry
04.10.2017
UCL helps shape UK's battery research strategy for electric car revolution
UCL helps shape UK’s battery research strategy for electric car revolution
UCL has been selected to be a founding partner in the creation of a new institute that will help Britain develop battery technologies that will drive the electric vehicle (EV) revolution.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
29.09.2017
Artificial cell design gets a boost with the launch of FABRICELL
Artificial cell design gets a boost with the launch of FABRICELL
FABRICELL, a joint initiative between Imperial and Kings College London, launched this month with a series of talks including a Nobel Prize winner.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
28.09.2017
Scientists create endocytosis on demand by ’hotwiring’ cells
o Scientists develop method to create endocytosis on demand o System using a chemical and light likened to 'hotwiring' a car o Discovery could be used to 'feed' cells with drugs or nanoparticles A solution to the problem of creating endocytosis on demand is being compared to 'hotwiring' a car.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Chemistry
22.09.2017
Business/Economics - Chemistry
21.09.2017
North of England generates £91 billion for UK bioeconomy
North of England generates £91 billion for UK bioeconomy
Lancaster University has contributed to a government-commissioned report which has shown that the north of England generates an annual turnover of £91 billion and employs more than 400,000 people in the regional bioeconomy.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
21.09.2017
Dino-killing asteroid sped up bird evolution
Dino-killing asteroid sped up bird evolution
Human activities could change the pace of evolution, similar to what occurred 66 million years ago when a giant asteroid wiped out the dinosaurs, leaving modern birds as their only descendants. That's one conclusion drawn by the authors of a new study just published in  Systematic Biology. Dr Daniel Field from the Milner Centre for Evolution at the University of Bath and Cornell PhD candidate Jacob Berv suggest that the meteor-induced mass extinction (a.k.a.
Earth Sciences - Chemistry
20.09.2017
New toothpaste uses latest research to put minerals back into teeth
New toothpaste uses latest research to put minerals back into teeth
Researchers from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) have launched a new toothpaste which repairs decaying teeth using 'bioactive' glass.
Chemistry - Physics/Materials Science
19.09.2017
Copying nature's lock-and-key system could improve rapid medical diagnostics
Copying nature’s lock-and-key system could improve rapid medical diagnostics
Researchers have designed a system that rapidly recognises the specific biological molecules that can indicate disease. The team from Imperial College London have developed a nanoscale sensor that can selectively detect protein molecules at the single-molecule level, which could help in early stage clinical diagnosis.
Chemistry
18.09.2017
Step towards better ’beyond lithium’ batteries
A step towards new "beyond lithium" rechargeable batteries with superior performance has been made by researchers at the University of Bath. We increasingly rely on rechargeable batteries for a host of essential uses; from mobile phones and electric cars to electrical grid storage. At present this demand is taken up by lithium-ion batteries.
Chemistry - Environment/Sustainable Development
18.09.2017
Organic phosphorus key to future food security and sustainability
Organic phosphorus key to future food security and sustainability
Research into organic phosphorus is key to ensure future food security and environmental sustainability, according to an international group of scientists led by researchers at the James Hutton Institute, Lancaster University's Environment Centre and Rothamsted Research in the UK.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
14.09.2017
Hydrogen power moves a step closer
Hydrogen power moves a step closer
Physicists at Lancaster University are developing methods of creating renewable fuel from water using quantum technology.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
12.09.2017
Sexually aroused male flies unable to sleep after close encounters with females
Sexually aroused male flies unable to sleep after close encounters with females
The urge to mate appears to override the need to sleep in flies, according to new research that hints at the importance of sleep for animals. The result suggests that there are some situations where flies and other animals can eliminate the drive to sleep entirely, rather than put it off until later.
Chemistry
11.09.2017
Self-assembling nanoparticle arrays can switch between a mirror and a window
Self-assembling nanoparticle arrays can switch between a mirror and a window
By finely tuning the distance between nanoparticles in a single layer, researchers have made a filter that can change between a mirror and a window. The development could help scientists create special materials whose optical properties can be changed in real time. These materials could then be used for applications from tuneable optical filters to miniature chemical sensors.
Chemistry - Medicine/Pharmacology
07.09.2017
Chemistry - Physics/Materials Science
07.09.2017
Scientists make methanol using air around us
Scientists at Cardiff University have created methanol from methane using oxygen from the air. Methanol is currently produced by breaking down natural gas at high temperatures into hydrogen gas and carbon monoxide before reassembling them - expensive and energy-intensive processes known as ‘steam reforming' and ‘methanol synthesis.' But researchers at Cardiff Catalysis Institute have discovered they can produce methanol from methane through simple catalysis that allows methanol production at low temperatures using oxygen and hydrogen peroxide.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
04.09.2017
Artificial enzyme functions as well as natural version
Artificial enzyme functions as well as natural version
Scientists from the University of Bristol have designed an artificial enzyme that functions as well as (and in some cases better than) a vital class of natural enzymes.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
31.08.2017
Underwater expedition ties together physical, chemical and biological impacts of melting ice sheets
Underwater expedition ties together physical, chemical and biological impacts of melting ice sheets
A group of international researchers have returned from a highly successful expedition to the Labrador Sea and coastal Greenland, led by scientists at the University of Bristol. The aim of the expedition was to investigate the role of melting ice on the chemistry and biology of the oceans - to find out how melting ice supplies the essential nutrients that feed marine life.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
30.08.2017
Fluorescent crystal mystery solved
Fluorescent crystal mystery solved
A decades-old mystery of why a naturally-occurring organic crystal fluoresces blue under ultra-violet light, yet when grown under laboratory conditions fluoresces with an intense green colour, has been solved by scientists from the University of Bristol. The colour of crystals is a function of their atomic structure.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
18.08.2017
Scientist shortlisted in national image competition | University of Oxford
'Butterfly in a cell' represents mitochondria, small structures floating free throughout the cell, that create the energy that allows the heart to keep pumping.
Administration/Government - Chemistry
17.08.2017
Chemistry - Computer Science/Telecom
16.08.2017
Candy cane supercapacitor could enable fast charging of mobile phones
Candy cane supercapacitor could enable fast charging of mobile phones
Supercapacitors promise recharging of phones and other devices in seconds and minutes as opposed to hours for batteries.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
09.08.2017
Why abseiling spiders don't spin out of control - new research
Why abseiling spiders don’t spin out of control - new research
Seeing an abseiling spider descend gracefully using its dragline silk instead of spinning unpredictably and uncontrollably is a magnificent sight.
Arts and Design - Chemistry
09.08.2017
Humphry Davy: Laughing Gas, Literature and the Lamp
Humphry Davy: Laughing Gas, Literature and the Lamp
A free online course , organised by Lancaster University, will examine one of the best-known men of science of the nineteenth century.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
07.08.2017
Using glucose to fuel drug delivery to the brain
Using glucose to fuel drug delivery to the brain
A new drug delivery system that autonomously navigates the body using its own glucose molecules has been developed and tested by a UCL-led team of scientists.
Chemistry - Life Sciences
03.08.2017
Armyworm biopesticide moves closer
Armyworm biopesticide moves closer
Researchers win funding to push forward the production of a cheap, effective and locally-produced biopesticide to combat one of Africa's major crop pests.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
01.08.2017
Structure of newly discovered antibiotics finally pinned down
Structure of newly discovered antibiotics finally pinned down
Chemists from the University of Bristol have revised the structure of baulamycins A and B by combining chemical synthesis, computational modelling and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In 2014, a team from Michigan University discovered two molecules, baulamycins A and B, from the coast of Costa Rica that were very active against anthrax and superbug MRSA.
Earth Sciences - Chemistry
20.07.2017
Link identified between continental breakup, volcanic carbon emissions and evolution
Link identified between continental breakup, volcanic carbon emissions and evolution
Researchers have found that the formation and breakup of supercontinents over hundreds of millions of years controls volcanic carbon emissions. The results , reported , could lead to a reinterpretation of how the carbon cycle has evolved over Earth's history, and how this has impacted the evolution of Earth's habitability.  The link between oxygen levels and the burial of organic material allowed life on Earth as we know it to evolve, but our geological record of this link needs to be re-evaluated.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
20.07.2017
Imperial academic to lead UK's new national science hub
Imperial academic to lead UK’s new national science hub
An Imperial chemical engineer will lead a new national centre of excellence in technology development and innovation.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Chemistry
20.07.2017
Can the UK's gas grid go green? New white paper explores options
Can the UK’s gas grid go green? New white paper explores options
Options for a greener gas grid are explored by researchers from Imperial College London in a white paper out today. The gas grid or network currently transports natural gas to industries, households and businesses. Due to concerns over greenhouse gas emissions, scientific scenarios to tackle climate change show a reduced role for gas networks in the future, with policymakers preferring routes that involve decarbonised electricity.
Chemistry - Event
19.07.2017
First Monash Warwick Alliance science PhD graduate receives degree
First student from the Monash Warwick Alliance to receive degree in person graduated at the University of Warwick this week Sze-Yin Tan - originally from Malaysia - awarded a Doctor of Philosophy in
Careers/Employment - Chemistry
18.07.2017
Perfecting the Pipers crisp
When Pipers Crisps — one of Britain's best-known crisp brands — wanted to understand more about the science behind their premium products and processes they turned to food experts at the University of Nottingham. This Knowledge Transfer Partnership (KTP), supported by Innovate UK , was established in 2015.
Chemistry
10.07.2017
Green method developed for making artificial spider silk
Green method developed for making artificial spider silk
Researchers have designed a super stretchy, strong and sustainable material that mimics the qualities of spider silk, and is ‘spun' from a material that is 98% water.  This method of making fibres could be a sustainable alternative to current manufacturing methods. Darshil Shah A team of architects and chemists from the University of Cambridge has designed super-stretchy and strong fibres which are almost entirely composed of water, and could be used to make textiles, sensors and other materials.
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