Category


Years
2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012/2012 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

Last News


Results 201 - 250 of 1482.

Law/Forensics
26.10.2017
New exhibition challenges abortion stigma through clothing
My Body My Life, a new research-based exhibition, that challenges abortion stigma through clothing, will run next month at the Old Fire Station, Oxford, from 7-11 November 2017.
Physics/Materials Science - Astronomy
26.10.2017
New PhD training centre at Lancaster to boost UK's data science expertise
New PhD training centre at Lancaster to boost UK’s data science expertise
Data intensive science in the UK has received a major boost thanks to an investment of almost £10million to train the next generation of experts.
Business/Economics - Administration/Government
26.10.2017
UK consumers paying too much for energy, according to Oxford expert
A new review of the UK's energy sector, conducted by Professor Dieter Helm, Economic Fellow and Professor of Economic Policy at Oxford University, suggests that British consumers are paying more than they need to for energy bills.
Literature/Linguistics - History/Archeology
26.10.2017
The man who tried to read all the books in the world
The man who tried to read all the books in the world
One man's quest to create a library of everything, 500 years before Google Books was conceived, foreshadowed the challenges of 'big data' and our reliance on search algorithms to make sense of it all.
Social Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
26.10.2017
Mental wellbeing of Generation X directly linked to childhood 
Mental wellbeing of Generation X directly linked to childhood 
Childhood disadvantage is strongly associated with poorer adult mental wellbeing for Generation X, according to a UCL study. This remained the case even if they were able to overcome their childhood circumstances to climb the social ladder by early middle age. In contrast, Baby Boomers' childhood background was not linked to their wellbeing in adulthood.
Physics/Materials Science
26.10.2017
’Twisted’ light could illuminate new path for wireless communications
Scientists have taken an important step towards using ‘twisted' light as a form of wireless, high-capacity data transmission which could make fibre-optics obsolete. In a new report published today (Thursday 26 October) in the journal Science Advances , a team of physicists based in the UK, Germany, New Zealand and Canada describe how new research into ‘optical angular momentum' (OAM) could overcome current difficulties with using twisted light across open spaces.
Medicine/Pharmacology
26.10.2017
Why are cancer patients with pre-existing disabilities reporting poorer care?
Researchers at Cardiff University are exploring the reasons why cancer patients with physical impairments experience greater problems in accessing healthcare compared to the general population.
Literature/Linguistics - Administration/Government
26.10.2017
Finding the UK's favourite nature book
Finding the UK’s favourite nature book
Finding the UK's favourite nature book Which nature book is a real favourite? Or maybe inspired a life-long love of wildlife? The diversity and influence of nature writing has never been so great and
Event - Medicine/Pharmacology
26.10.2017
Careers/Employment
26.10.2017
Which types of people are most likely to under-report their taxes
36% of self-assessment taxpayers have some under-reporting on their taxes. This rises to almost 60% among the self-employed, Warwick researcher finds. Men are more likely to under-report than women (40% vs 27%). However, among both men and women who under-report, 32% of total tax owed was not declared.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Administration/Government
26.10.2017
How $14 billion protected Earth's species
How $14 billion protected Earth’s species
Billions of dollars of financial investment in global conservation has significantly reduced biodiversity loss, according to a new UCL study.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Astronomy
26.10.2017
Researchers to explore Mars and its environment
Researchers to explore Mars and its environment
Three academics from the University of Bristol will explore Mars and the microgravity environment, thanks to funding from the UK Space Agency in the latest round of the Aurora Science Programme and the Human Spaceflight and Microgravity programme. The Aurora Science Programme targets questions of past and present life on Mars, investigating the presence of water and the geochemical environment.
Social Sciences - Politics
26.10.2017
Deep divisions persisting on Brexit
New research published by the University's Wales Governance Centre reveals that deep divisions still exist between Remain and Leave voters in the June 2016 Brexit referendum, and that no consensus is emerging among Welsh people on the Brexit process.
Social Sciences - Earth Sciences
25.10.2017
Campaign and Cardiff launch tool-kit to link evidence and policymaking
The University and the Campaign for Social Science have worked together to develop a new online tool-kit designed to help new researchers improve their political impact.
Computer Science/Telecom
25.10.2017
London air quality monitoring improved with new project
Air quality in London is set to be better monitored, thanks to the launch of a new project between the Alan Turing Institute and the Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan - led by Dr Theo Damoulas of the University of Warwick. The venture - launched this week - will explore ways to improve how air quality is modelled in the capital, by drawing together data from existing and new sensors, and enhancing the way this data is analysed.
Business/Economics
25.10.2017
Introducing... Miriam Sharma
Introducing... Miriam Sharma
Introducing... Miriam Sharma After another frenetic start to the academic year, we talk to Residential Support Manager, Miriam Sharma , about the 24/7 support available to student residents at Sussex.
Agronomy/Food Science - Environment/Sustainable Development
25.10.2017
Changing the face of Indian farming
Changing the face of Indian farming
Indian agriculture is expected to feed a growing and increasingly urbanised population. But if everyone wants to move to towns and cities, who is left to farm the land? The farming is left to the older women - the mothers and sometimes the grandmothers.
Law/Forensics
25.10.2017
University expands free legal advice service to local public
University expands free legal advice service to local public
A Lancaster University Law School Legal Advice Clinic providing free legal advice to local residents is about to get off the ground.
Environment/Sustainable Development
25.10.2017
'Scars' left by icebergs record West Antarctic ice retreat
’Scars’ left by icebergs record West Antarctic ice retreat
Thousands of marks on the Antarctic seafloor, caused by icebergs which broke free from glaciers more than ten thousand years ago, show how part of the Antarctic Ice Sheet retreated rapidly at the end of the last ice age as it balanced precariously on sloping ground and became unstable.
Medicine/Pharmacology
25.10.2017
Politics
25.10.2017
Reversing Brexit would be catastrophic for politics, says Lisa Nandy
Reversing Brexit would be catastrophic for politics, says Lisa Nandy
Remainers need to drop the idea of reversing Brexit, according to Lisa Nandy MP. Speaking to Professor Philip Cowley at QMUL's Mile End Institute, she the consequences of a reversal would be catastrophic.
Environment/Sustainable Development
25.10.2017
Social Sciences - Administration/Government
25.10.2017
University seeks time travellers to take part in experiments
University seeks time travellers to take part in experiments
Time travel to 2051 and explore the future of mobility with researchers at Lancaster University who are appealing for local people to help with 12 ‘experiments' ahead of an international conference.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
25.10.2017
Sussex physicists have breakthrough on brittle smartphone screens
Sussex physicists have breakthrough on brittle smartphone screens
Sussex physicists have breakthrough on brittle smartphone screens Scientists at the University of Sussex may have found a solution to the long-standing problem of brittle smartphone screens. Professor Alan Dalton and his team have developed a new way to make smartphone touch screens that are cheaper, less brittle, and more environmentally friendly.
Administration/Government - Medicine/Pharmacology
25.10.2017
Strengthening adoption services for children who wait
Cardiff University and St David's Children Society have partnered for a project aiming to strengthen adoption services.
Environment/Sustainable Development
25.10.2017
Herbivores help protect marine ecosystems from climate change
Herbivores help protect marine ecosystems from climate change
Plant-eating critters are key to helping ecosystems survive global warming, offering some hope for a defence strategy against climate change. An international research team created miniature marine ecosystems and tested how they fared in warmer conditions. They found that in the hottest conditions, ecosystems that included limpets - voracious snail-like marine herbivores - fared the best.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Business/Economics
25.10.2017
Carbon capture: universities and industry work together to tackle emissions
Carbon capture: universities and industry work together to tackle emissions
An international collaboration between universities and industry will further develop carbon capture and storage technology - one of the best hopes for drastically reducing carbon emissions - so that it can be deployed in a wider range of sites around the world.
Chemistry - Life Sciences
24.10.2017
'35 years of innovation and collaboration' celebrated in Hong Kong
’35 years of innovation and collaboration’ celebrated in Hong Kong
One of Imperial's most successful alumni groups held a special gala with President Alice Gast in Hong Kong at the weekend.
Religions - History/Archeology
24.10.2017
Animating objects: what material culture can tell us about domestic devotions
Animating objects: what material culture can tell us about domestic devotions
Rustic figurines of a resigned-looking Virgin clutching her child may have no obvious literary or artistic merit to us today.
History/Archeology - Earth Sciences
24.10.2017
Keeping it in the family: Inheritance in Victorian and Edwardian Britain
Keeping it in the family: Inheritance in Victorian and Edwardian Britain
Inheritance has been a topic of fascination in Britain for centuries. It provides a tantalising glimpse of what people are worth, and offers a reliable dose of drama about how wealth is passed on, who gets richer, and who misses out.
Earth Sciences - Astronomy
24.10.2017
Underwater sound waves help scientists locate ocean impacts
Scientists have developed a new method to locate the precise time and location that objects fall into our oceans. The method, developed by researchers from Cardiff University, uses underwater microphones, also known as hydrophones, to listen for underwater sound waves that are emitted when an object hits the sea surface.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
24.10.2017
Silk could be used to repair damaged spinal cords
Modified silk from Asian wild silkworms could be used in a strategy to repair damaged spinal cords, according to scientists from the universities of Aberdeen and Oxford. The researchers, working in collaboration with Oxford Biomaterials Ltd, discovered that cleaned, sterilised silk from the Antheraea pernyi (AP) silk spinner had properties well suited to spinal repair.
Medicine/Pharmacology
23.10.2017
Death rates differ over three-fold between occupational groups
Death rates differ over three-fold between occupational groups
People who work in factories, construction and in housekeeping jobs are the occupational groups that have the highest mortality rates, according to a new study. Researchers from the MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, University of Glasgow, have published the first study to rank mortality rates by occupation in the UK in 30 years, in the Lancet Public Health today.
Physics/Materials Science
23.10.2017
Scientists write 'traps' for light with tiny ink droplets
Scientists write ’traps’ for light with tiny ink droplets
A microscopic 'pen' that is able to write structures small enough to trap and harness light using a commercially available printing technique could be used for sensing, biotechnology, lasers, and studying the interaction between light and matter. Previous efforts to combine these two areas had bumped into the limitations of conventional inkjet printing technology.
Administration/Government - Social Sciences
23.10.2017
Opinion: UK research in troubled political times
Opinion: UK research in troubled political times
As Brexit negotiations appear to stall, Professor Dame Athene Donald considers the effect of the UK's withdrawal from EU research schemes.
Administration/Government
23.10.2017
Bristol named as UK's smartest city
Bristol named as UK’s smartest city
Bristol has overtaken London as the UK's leading 'smart city' according to the second UK Smart Cities Index, commissioned by Huawei UK and conducted by Navigant Consulting.
Religions
23.10.2017
How to ensure volunteers fill the holiday hunger gap
How to ensure volunteers fill the holiday hunger gap
With up to 3.2 million children facing the prospect of not having enough food to eat during half term, new research has highlighted the importance of volunteers in filling the 'holiday hunger' gap. Stephanie Denning, a researcher at the University of Bristol, joined forces with the charity MakeLunch to understand how Christian church groups are responding to the growing problem, and how best to ensure volunteers remain engaged.
Physics/Materials Science - Mathematics
23.10.2017
Scientists create magnetic system transforming heat into motion
A team of scientists have found a new way to transform ambient heat into motion in nanoscale devices - a discovery which could open up new possibilities for data storage, sensors, nanomotors and other applications in the ever-shrinking world of electronics.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Environment/Sustainable Development
23.10.2017
Mayor launches T-charge for
Mayor launches T-charge for "dirtiest" polluting vehicles during UCL nursery visit
Sadiq Khan, London's Mayor, marked the start of his T-charge on vehicles to combat city pollution by visiting UCL's nursery in Bloomsbury.
History/Archeology
23.10.2017
First ever Global South professor announced
Professor Rosinka Chaudhuri has been appointed Oxford University's first ever Global South-Mellon Visiting Professor.
Medicine/Pharmacology
23.10.2017
Warwick metabolism unit helps Ice Maidens Antarctic team
Earlier this month, six British women visited the University of Warwick's metabolism unit for a complete metabolic check-up before embarking on a gruelling trek across Antarctica.
Mathematics
23.10.2017
The world's first 3D printed steel bridge will be a 'living laboratory'
The world’s first 3D printed steel bridge will be a ’living laboratory’
Imperial researchers are part of a team testing a 3D printed footbridge due to be installed across a canal in Amsterdam in 2018.
Business/Economics
23.10.2017
WMG gives free access to tool for companies preparing for Industry 4 – enabling the next generation of manufacturing
WMG researchers, at the University of Warwick, have worked in conjunction with Crimson & Co and Pinsent Masons, to produce a free to access "Industry 4" readiness assessment tool.
Earth Sciences - Computer Science/Telecom
23.10.2017
Machine learning used to predict earthquakes in a lab setting
Machine learning used to predict earthquakes in a lab setting
A group of researchers from the UK and the US have used machine learning techniques to successfully predict earthquakes. Although their work was performed in a laboratory setting, the experiment closely mimics real-life conditions, and the results could be used to predict the timing of a real earthquake.† This is the first time that machine learning has been used to analyse acoustic data to predict when an earthquake will occur.
Literature/Linguistics
22.10.2017
Step inside the mind of the young Stephen Hawking as his PhD thesis goes online for first time
Step inside the mind of the young Stephen Hawking as his PhD thesis goes online for first time
Stephen Hawking's PhD thesis, ' Properties of expanding universes' , has been made freely available to anyone, anywhere in the world after being made accessible via the University of Cambridge's Open Access repository, Apollo.
Sport Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
22.10.2017
New injury prevention exercise programme will dramatically reduce injuries in rugby
New injury prevention exercise programme will dramatically reduce injuries in rugby
A new dynamic 20-minute exercise programme, performed by rugby players before training and pre-match, could dramatically reduce injuries in the sport according to a benchmark study published today (Sunday 22 October). Published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine , the collaborative project between health researchers at the University and England Rugby shows that the introduction of a simple injury prevention exercise programme has significant impacts in reducing rates both for concussion and lower limb injuries.

 
Jobs on