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Environment - Earth Sciences - 07.02.2019
New climate models suggest that future sea level rise could be much lower than previously feared
New climate models suggest that future sea level rise could be much lower than previously feared
Two papers published in Nature this week call into doubt recent predictions of imminent Antarctic ice sheet collapse. They are led by King's College London and Victoria University of Wellington, and involve colleagues from across the US, Canada, UK and Europe, including the University of Bristol. The first paper suggests that sustained collapse of Antarctic ice-cliffs into the ocean, caused by rising global temperatures and melting ice shelves, may not have a large impact on sea level rise.

Palaeontology - Earth Sciences - 04.02.2019
Glasgow will face off with a new dinosaur as Trix the T.rex comes to Town
Image courtesy of Naturalis Visitors to Glasgow will get an amazing opportunity to see one of the best preserved Tyrannosaurus rex skeletons when it visits Scotland on the last leg of its European tour.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 29.01.2019
Researchers share expertise to tackle global challenges
Researchers share expertise to tackle global challenges
Scientists from the University of Bristol will be sharing their expertise as part of two new £20 million UK Research and Innovation Global Research Hubs funded through the Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF).

Earth Sciences - 29.01.2019
UofG project wins NERC funding for flood risk assessment
A University of Glasgow-led research project which aims to provide improved defence against flooding in the Philippines has won funding from the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC).

Health - Earth Sciences - 02.01.2019
Ing health hazards of volcanic emissions
Ing health hazards of volcanic emissions
Researching health hazards of volcanic emissions There are 1,500 active volcanoes worldwide andKīlauea volcano in Hawaii is one of the most active.

Life Sciences - Earth Sciences - 07.11.2018
Tiny crustacean had a heart more than 400 million years ago
Tiny crustacean had a heart more than 400 million years ago
An Imperial researcher is part of an international team that has discovered a rare and exceptionally well-preserved crustacean. The fossil is a new species of ostracod, a relative of crabs and shrimps, and is just a few millimetres long. Exceptional preservation This particular fossil preserves not just the animal's hard shell, but also its limbs, eyes, gut and gills - soft parts that are extremely rarely preserved.

Earth Sciences - 31.10.2018

Earth Sciences - 17.10.2018
Prioritising help for the poorest hit by deadly natural disasters
Prioritising help for the poorest hit by deadly natural disasters
17 October 2018 A new statistical tool to help target resources following deadly natural disasters has been created by the University of Bristol, allowing governments to prioritise getting aid to the most vulnerable people.

Earth Sciences - 13.09.2018
Imperial geologist tackles field trip mental health
Imperial geologist tackles field trip mental health
Field trips help students and academics explore the environments they study - but some suffer mental health difficulties when out on excursions. Though field work is often seen as the highlight of studying or working in natural and earth sciences, the reality can be quite different.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 29.08.2018

Palaeontology - Earth Sciences - 26.07.2018
Classic fossil site re-explored in undergraduate project
Classic fossil site re-explored in undergraduate project
Aust Cliff near Bristol has been known as a rich fossil site since the 1820s. Since then, thousands of people have visited this spectacular location on the banks of the Severn, and collected fossils of ancient sharks and sea dragons.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 25.07.2018
Deforestation will have 'drastic impact' on South America
Deforestation will have ’drastic impact’ on South America
Deforestation of the ‘overlooked' Guiana rainforests will have drastic impact on the rainfall patterns that support ecosystems and livelihoods across South America, warn scientists from Durham and other UK universities in a new report.

Earth Sciences - Life Sciences - 29.06.2018
Scientists set sail for Greenland’s fjords to unravel mysteries of nutrient cycling
A University of Bristol geochemist is to lead an international team of researchers to Greenland's fjords to find out how glacial meltwaters and coastal sediments are affecting nutrient cycling in the oceans. Glaciers are known to be a source of phosphate, silicon and iron, nutrients that are essential for the growth of the marine algae that form the basis of the food chain in the oceans.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 25.06.2018
Who shares experiences of climate change in a 1.5C world and beyond?
A new framework to understand how uneven the effects of a 1.5C world are for different countries around the world has been published today in Geophysical Research Letters, led by researchers from the Environmental Change Institute (ECI) at the Oxford University Department of Geography. It has been long understood that climate change will affect some regions more severely than others.

Earth Sciences - Astronomy / Space Science - 29.05.2018
Major GNSS project to boost potential for 'satellite' farming in Brazil
The University of Nottingham is working with Brazilian and EU partners to solve atmospheric interference problems that hamper satellite-based positioning in equatorial countries like Brazil.

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 04.05.2018
Measuring earthquakes on Mars
The NASA InSight mission, which stands for Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport, is due to launch from California aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket at 12.05pm (BST) today (Saturday 5 May). Image credit: UK Space Agency Oxford University is to contribute to a new mission to Mars, which will be the first to study the heart of the Red Planet and measure 'Marsquakes' from its surface.

Earth Sciences - Careers / Employment - 24.04.2018
Gender inequality is 'drowning out' the voices of women scientists
Gender inequality is ’drowning out’ the voices of women scientists
A University of Cambridge researcher is calling for the voices of women to be given a fairer platform at a leading scientific conference.

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 17.04.2018
New ocean plankton species named after BBC's Blue Planet series
New ocean plankton species named after BBC’s Blue Planet series
A newly discovered species of ocean plankton, Syracosphaera azureaplaneta , has been named by UCL researchers in honour of the critically acclaimed BBC Blue Planet series and its presenter Sir David Attenborough.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 09.04.2018
New land motion map shows the human impact on the UK landscape
Researchers at the University of Nottingham who developed groundbreaking technology which was used to create the first country-wide land motion map of Scotland, have scored another first by creating a new UK-wide ground motion map. Using thousands of satellite radar images, the technology was applied under license by Geomatic Ventures Limited (GVL), an innovative University spin-out company, to create a complete land motion map of the UK as a natural progression from the first country-wide map of ground motion in Scotland.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 27.02.2018

Environment - Earth Sciences - 19.02.2018
Carbon dioxide ’pulses’ threaten Scotland’s coralline algal reefs
Scotland's marine ecosystems may be more sensitive to carbon dioxide than previously thought, and could be damaged irreparably by the CO2 ‘pulses' created by industrial activities, land run off or natural tidal processes.

Earth Sciences - 19.02.2018
Loneliest tree in the world marks new age for our planet
Loneliest tree in the world marks new age for our planet
The planet entered a new geological epoch known as the Anthropocene in 1965, according to a new study led by UCL and University of New South Wales. The Anthropocene has become a term used by scientists all over the world, seeking to put a marker on when humans began to leave a significant impact on the planet.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 24.01.2018

Earth Sciences - Electroengineering - 10.01.2018
Tracing how disaster impacts escalate will improve emergency responses
Tracing how disaster impacts escalate will improve emergency responses
Mapping common pathways along which the effects of natural and man-made disasters travel allows more flexible and resilient responses in the future, according to UCL researchers.

Life Sciences - Earth Sciences - 10.01.2018

Earth Sciences - Chemistry - 13.12.2017
Chemical tipping point of magma determines explosive potential of volcanoes
Chemical tipping point of magma determines explosive potential of volcanoes
Volcanic eruptions are the most spectacular expression of the processes acting in the interior of any active planet.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 12.12.2017

Earth Sciences - Astronomy / Space Science - 21.11.2017
Unexpected atmospheric vortex behaviour on Saturn's moon Titan
Unexpected atmospheric vortex behaviour on Saturn’s moon Titan
A new study, led by a University of Bristol earth scientist, has shown that recently reported unexpected behaviour on Titan, the largest moon of Saturn, is due to its unique atmospheric chemistry. Titan's polar atmosphere recently experiences and unexpected and significant cooling, contrary to all model predictions and differing from the behaviour of all other terrestrial planets in our solar system.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 16.11.2017
One in ten historic coastal landfill sites in England are at risk of erosion
One in ten historic coastal landfill sites in England are at risk of erosion
Coastal erosion may release waste from ten per cent of England's historic coastal landfills in the next forty years, according to research from Queen Mary University of London and the Environment Agency.

Earth Sciences - Life Sciences - 26.10.2017
'Bandit-masked' feathered dinosaur hid from predators using multiple types of camouflage
’Bandit-masked’ feathered dinosaur hid from predators using multiple types of camouflage
Researchers from the University of Bristol have revealed how a small feathered dinosaur used its colour patterning, including a bandit mask-like stripe across its eyes, to avoid being detected by its predators and prey. By reconstructing the likely colour patterning of the Chinese dinosaur Sinosauropteryx , researchers have shown that it had multiple types of camouflage which likely helped it to avoid being eaten in a world full of larger meat-eating dinosaurs, including relatives of the infamous Tyrannosaurus Rex, as well as potentially allowing it to sneak up more easily on its own prey.

Social Sciences - Earth Sciences - 25.10.2017
Campaign and Cardiff launch tool-kit to link evidence and policymaking
The University and the Campaign for Social Science have worked together to develop a new online tool-kit designed to help new researchers improve their political impact.

History / Archeology - Earth Sciences - 24.10.2017
Keeping it in the family: Inheritance in Victorian and Edwardian Britain
Keeping it in the family: Inheritance in Victorian and Edwardian Britain
Inheritance has been a topic of fascination in Britain for centuries. It provides a tantalising glimpse of what people are worth, and offers a reliable dose of drama about how wealth is passed on, who gets richer, and who misses out.

Earth Sciences - Astronomy / Space Science - 24.10.2017
Underwater sound waves help scientists locate ocean impacts
Scientists have developed a new method to locate the precise time and location that objects fall into our oceans. The method, developed by researchers from Cardiff University, uses underwater microphones, also known as hydrophones, to listen for underwater sound waves that are emitted when an object hits the sea surface.

Earth Sciences - Computer Science / Telecom - 23.10.2017
Machine learning used to predict earthquakes in a lab setting
Machine learning used to predict earthquakes in a lab setting
A group of researchers from the UK and the US have used machine learning techniques to successfully predict earthquakes. Although their work was performed in a laboratory setting, the experiment closely mimics real-life conditions, and the results could be used to predict the timing of a real earthquake. This is the first time that machine learning has been used to analyse acoustic data to predict when an earthquake will occur.

Earth Sciences - Life Sciences - 10.10.2017
New ichthyosaur species, long gone, found in a storeroom
A new species of ichthyosaur has been identified from a fossil that has been in the University of Nottingham's engineering collection for over half a century. The University's specimen, announced today as Protoichthyosaurus applebyi, is a holotype - the valuable original specimen that describes a new species.

Earth Sciences - 06.10.2017
New study analyses volcanic fatalities in more detail than ever before
New study analyses volcanic fatalities in more detail than ever before
Building on existing information and databases relating to volcanic fatalities, scientists from the University of Bristol have, for the first time, been able to classify victims by activity or occupation and look at the distance of their death from the volcano. It is hoped the findings, published recently in the Journal of Applied Volcanology , will help increase our understanding of volcanic hazards and the subsequent threat to life.

Health - Earth Sciences - 25.09.2017
Study identifies likely scenarios for global spread of devastating crop disease
Study identifies likely scenarios for global spread of devastating crop disease
New research reveals for the first time the most likely months and routes for the spread of new strains of airborne 'wheat stem rust' that may endanger global food security by ravaging wheat production across Africa, the Middle East, Asia and the wider world. New races of wheat rust are threatening wheat worldwide, and we need to know which areas are at risk Chris Gilligan Stem rust, named for the blackening pustules that infect plant stems, caused devastating crop epidemics and famine for centuries before being tamed by fungicides and resistance genes.

Physics - Earth Sciences - 25.09.2017
New type of supercomputer could be based on 'magic dust' combination of light and matter
New type of supercomputer could be based on ’magic dust’ combination of light and matter
A team of researchers from the UK and Russia have successfully demonstrated that a type of 'magic dust' which combines light and matter can be used to solve complex problems and could eventually surpass the capabilities of even the most powerful supercomputers.

Earth Sciences - Chemistry - 20.09.2017
New toothpaste uses latest research to put minerals back into teeth
New toothpaste uses latest research to put minerals back into teeth
Researchers from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) have launched a new toothpaste which repairs decaying teeth using 'bioactive' glass.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 18.09.2017
Urgent emission reductions needed to achieve 1.5°C warming limit
Significant emission reductions are required if we are to achieve one of the key goals of the Paris Agreement, and limit the increase in global average temperatures to 1.5°C; a new Oxford University partnership warns.
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