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Social Sciences - Sport Sciences - 07.08.2018
Football used as scapegoat for domestic violence
Football used as scapegoat for domestic violence
7 August 2018 Scapegoating football as a trigger for domestic violence trivialises the issue and risks offering offenders an excuse for their behaviour, according to a UK study. Reports linking a spike in cases with the outcome of Old Firm games and England's World Cup performance lack reliable data and fail to recognise abuse is a pattern of ongoing behaviour.

Sport Sciences - Life Sciences - 12.07.2018
Frustrated with football's pain fakers' Blame evolution - according to a new Sussex study
Frustrated with football’s pain fakers’ Blame evolution - according to a new Sussex study
Frustrated with football's pain fakers' Blame evolution - according to a new Sussex study Psychologists at University of Sussex discover that we can fake pain convincingly Real cries of pain are louder, longer and rougher on the ear Learning to fake pain cries and other vocalisations may have been a key step in the evolution of speech There's potential for a pain-detection device to be developed Psychologists at the University of Sussex have shown that football's pain fakers may be tapping into an evolutionary strategy that aided our ancestors' survival and helped speech emerge.

Computer Science / Telecom - Sport Sciences - 29.06.2018
Virtual reality burger game tests the appetite for playing by the rules
Virtual reality burger game tests the appetite for playing by the rules
Can you play by the rules and make lots of money or is it worth taking risks' That's the question researchers at the University of Nottingham are asking with a unique virtual reality game. The Corrupt Kitchen VR Experience puts players in charge of a burger business and gives them ten minutes to make as much money as possible.

Social Sciences - Sport Sciences - 26.06.2018
Citizen scientists capture penguin breeding dynamics
As World Cup fever sets in, increased hooliganism and football related violence are legitimate international concerns. Previous research has linked sports-related hooliganism to 'social maladjustment' e.g. previous episodes of violence or dysfunctional behaviour at home, work or school etc.

Social Sciences - Sport Sciences - 22.06.2018
Social bonding key cause of football violence
As World Cup fever sets in, increased hooliganism and football related violence are legitimate international concerns. Previous research has linked sports-related hooliganism to 'social maladjustment' e.g. previous episodes of violence or dysfunctional behaviour at home, work or school etc.

Health - Sport Sciences - 22.06.2018
High levels of oral disease among elite athletes affecting performance
High levels of oral disease among elite athletes affecting performance
Significantly high levels of oral disease found among GB's elite athletes is leading to poorer on-field performance, research by UCL's Eastman Dental Institute has concluded. In the largest ever study of its kind, more than 350 sportsmen and women from nine GB Olympic teams, including swimming and rowing, along with Team Sky, England Rugby and Reading FC, underwent an oral health screening.

Health - Sport Sciences - 01.06.2018
New surgery for groin pain found to be more effective than physiotherapy
o Femoroacetabular impingement syndrome, is a cause of hip pain in young adults, often mistaken for groin strain, and is probably the commonest cause of groin pain in footballers o World's first randomised trial to show the benefit of hip arthroscopy o They found that patients improved with both treatments but were significantly better a year later after hip arthroscopy.

Sport Sciences - Business / Economics - 23.04.2018
Football makes fans less happy
Football makes fans less happy
Football makes fans less happy The pain felt by football fans after a defeat is more than double the joy of winning, according to researchers at the University of Sussex. The team analysed three million responses from 32,000 people on a smartphone app called Mappiness, which periodically asks users how they are feeling, what they are doing, where they are and who they are with.

Sport Sciences - 03.04.2018
Glasgow 2014 Games reports identify economic benefits but little in the way of a physical activity legacy
Glasgow 2014 Games reports identify economic benefits but little in the way of a physical activity legacy
The Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games has improved the environment and economic activity in Scotland's largest city. However there has been little impact on the number of people who are physically active or the rates of participation in regular exercise. The University of Glasgow has published two reports on the impact of the Games on the health and wellbeing of the city's East End communities.

Sport Sciences - Business / Economics - 20.03.2018
Why it doesn't pay to be just nice – you also need to be intelligent
Why it doesn’t pay to be just nice – you also need to be intelligent
Researchers at the Universities of Bristol, Minnesota and Heidelberg devised a series of games to find out which factors lead to cooperative behaviour when people interact in social and workplace situations. Their findings, due to be published in the Journal of Political Economy , showed that people with a higher IQ displayed 'significantly higher' levels of cooperation, which in turn led to them earning more money as part of the game.

Sport Sciences - Life Sciences - 03.03.2018
Researchers test 'brain training' games to improve the lives of people with hearing loss
Researchers at The University of Nottingham are involved in a new study that will test whether using online gaming techniques could help people to cope with hearing loss and adapt to hearing aids, it was announced on World Hearing Day (3 March 2018).

Sport Sciences - Health - 20.02.2018
Fake news 'vaccine': online game may 'inoculate' by simulating propaganda tactics
Fake news ’vaccine’: online game may ’inoculate’ by simulating propaganda tactics
A new experiment, launching today online, aims to help 'inoculate' against disinformation by providing a small dose of perspective from a "fake news tycoon".

Sport Sciences - Health - 23.11.2017
THE FA & THE PFA COMMISSION NEW STUDY INTO DEMENTIA IN FOOTBALL
The Football Association and the Professional Footballers' Association have appointed Dr William Stewart and colleagues at the University of Glasgow and the Hampden Sports Clinic to lead an independent research study into the incidence of degenerative neurocognitive disease in ex-professional footballers.

Sport Sciences - Health - 20.11.2017
Social mobile gaming boosts rehabilitation for physically impaired patients
Social mobile gaming boosts rehabilitation for physically impaired patients
A video game that enables healthy volunteers to play with patients who have physical impairments may improve their rehabilitation, suggests study. The researchers from Imperial have designed a video game called Balloon Buddies, which is a tool that enables those recovering from conditions such as a stroke to engage and play together with healthy volunteers such as therapists and family members as a form of rehabilitation.

Sport Sciences - 10.11.2017
Biobanding evaluation nets positive results among academy football teams
Biobanding evaluation nets positive results among academy football teams
Matching young players according to their developmental or biological age, as opposed to their chronological age, has positive effects in terms of performance, talent identification and injury reduction in football, according to a new significant new study. The paper, published in the Journal of Sports Sciences , from researchers in our Department for Health was also the first to explore athletes' experiences of competing in a 'biobanded tournament'.

Sport Sciences - Careers / Employment - 03.11.2017
Retired professional footballers at higher risk of knee osteoarthritis
Retired professional footballers are far more prone to develop knee pain and osteoarthritis and face problems with their knees earlier in life than the average person, a study has revealed. The study reported that male ex-footballers were two to three times more likely to suffer from knee pain and knee osteoarthritis and require a total knee replacement, even after adjustment for other risk factors including significant knee injury.

Social Sciences - Sport Sciences - 18.10.2017
Gentle touch soothes the pain of social rejection
Gentle touch soothes the pain of social rejection
The gentle touch of another individual soothes the effects of social exclusion, one of the most emotionally painful human experiences, according to new UCL research. The study, published today in Scientific Reports and funded by the European Research Council, tested the impact of a slow, affectionate touch against a fast, neutral touch following social rejection and found a specific relationship between gentle touch and social bonding.

Social Sciences - Sport Sciences - 26.09.2017
Understanding football violence could help the fight against terror
Football has long been tarnished by outbreaks of fan violence. Although media headlines often link the behaviour to 'hooliganism', the activity could stem from potentially more positive motivations, such as passionate commitment to the group and the desire to belong. Understanding the root cause of football violence may therefore help in tackling the behaviour and channelling it into something more positive, Oxford University scientists suggest.

Social Sciences - Sport Sciences - 19.09.2017
Winner takes all: Success enhances taste for luxury goods, study suggests
Winner takes all: Success enhances taste for luxury goods, study suggests
Footballers in flashy cars, City workers in Armani suits, reality TV celebrities sipping expensive champagne while sitting in hot tubs: what drives people to purchase luxury goods' New research suggests that it may be a sense of being a 'winner' - but that contrary to expectations, it is not driven by testosterone.

Sport Sciences - Life Sciences - 04.07.2017
Who'll win at Wimbledon? Just listen to the pitch of the grunts
Who’ll win at Wimbledon? Just listen to the pitch of the grunts
Who‘ll win at Wimbledon' Just listen to the pitch of the grunts Never mind counting aces and killer shots. If you want to predict the outcome of a tennis match, pay attention to the players' grunts. As Wimbledon prepares for another year of the on-court cacophony from the likes of Rafael Nadal and Victoria Azarenka, a new study has revealed that grunts produced by players during tennis matches they lost were higher in voice pitch than during the matches they won.
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