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Law / Forensics - Social Sciences - 19.06.2018
Changing the law to protect victims of upskirting
Changing the law to protect victims of upskirting
Professor Clare McGlynn of Durham Law School tells how her research has helped to shape a law on upskirting and why more comprehensive legislation is needed to protect victims from all image-based sexual abuse. Moves to legislate against upskirting - the act of secretly taking a photograph under a victim's skirt - hit the headlines when a planned law to criminalise the act stalled in Parliament.

Health - Social Sciences - 13.06.2018
Healthcare professionals get new guidance on how to talk to people living with dementia
Experts at the University of Nottingham have developed a new training course for healthcare professionals to help them communicate more effectively with patients living with dementia. Around one-quarter of hospital beds are occupied by people with dementia, many of whom have problems communicating and often don't understand the requests being asked of them.

Social Sciences - 07.06.2018
Bad news becomes hysteria in crowds, new research shows
News stories about potential threats become more negative, inaccurate and hysterical when passed from person to person - new University of Warwick research finds Even drawing the public's attention to balanced, neutral facts does not calm this hysteria "The more people share information, the more negative it becomes, the further it gets from the facts, and the more resistant it becomes to correction" - Professor Thomas Hills News stories about t

Social Sciences - 31.05.2018
Poorer sexual health outcomes for young people in care
Young people in foster care in Wales experience poorer sexual health outcomes, research at Cardiff University has found. Dr Louise Roberts, based in the School of Social Sciences, led on the research paper, which was a collaboration between the Centre for the Development and Evaluation of Complex Interventions for Public Health Improvement (DECIPHer) and the Children's Social Care Research and Development Centre (CASCADE).

Social Sciences - 30.05.2018
New mums' voices get lower after pregnancy, shows a University of Sussex study
New mums’ voices get lower after pregnancy, shows a University of Sussex study
New mums' voices get lower after pregnancy, shows a University of Sussex study The pitch of new mothers' voices temporarily drops after they have had their first baby, according to a new longitudinal study by Dr Kasia Pisanski, Kavya Bhardwaj, and Prof David Reby at the University of Sussex. The researchers analysed women's voices over a 10-year period - five years before and five years after childbirth - and found that new mothers' voices get lower, and become more monotonous after pregnancy.

Administration - Social Sciences - 23.05.2018
Government's grammar school funding won't improve children's outcomes
Government’s grammar school funding won’t improve children’s outcomes
Grammar school pupils do not gain any advantage over children who do not attend a grammar school by age 14, according to a new study from UCL. In the first study of its kind, researchers from the UCL Institute of Education (IOE) looked at a range of social and emotional outcomes, including young people's engagement and well-being at school, their aspirations for the future, in addition to educational attainment levels, to determine the benefits of attending a grammar school.

Social Sciences - 22.05.2018
Ethnically mixed schools better for social cohesion, says new study of teenagers' attitudes
Ethnically mixed schools better for social cohesion, says new study of teenagers’ attitudes
Pupils from schools with greater ethnic diversity have more positive feelings towards pupils of different ethnicities, according to a new study of attitudes in English secondary schools from the University of Bristol and the London School of Economics and Political Science. While pupils tend to have warmer feelings for their own ethnic group, the more mixed the school, the warmer the feelings for other ethnicities, promoting social cohesion.

Social Sciences - 02.05.2018
Seeking the truth on female genital cutting
Seeking the truth on female genital cutting
A new study by anthropologists at the University of Bristol will help campaigners to closely target their work in eradicating female genital cutting (FGC). The World Health Organisation report that an estimated three million girls are at risk every year of having their genitals cut in some way, mostly before the age of 15.

Health - Social Sciences - 23.04.2018
Sense of control and meaning helps protect women from anxiety, study suggests
Sense of control and meaning helps protect women from anxiety, study suggests
People who feel in control of their lives and who find purpose and meaning in life are less likely to have anxiety disorders even when going through the toughest times, according to a study led by the University of Cambridge.

Social Sciences - Psychology - 16.04.2018
'Cognitive flexibility' associated with voting attitudes in EU Referendum, study finds
’Cognitive flexibility’ associated with voting attitudes in EU Referendum, study finds
Latest research combining social and political surveys with objective cognitive testing suggests that "cognitive flexibility" contributes to formation of ideology. The study finds correlations between cognitive thinking styles and support for Brexit.

Social Sciences - History / Archeology - 05.04.2018
WW1 Prisoner of War letters published 100 years after being written
WW1 Prisoner of War letters published 100 years after being written
The letters speak of love, longing, worry and war. A prisoner of war and his family writing to each other to ease the pain of separation during the First World War. Now seven months of correspondence, between Professor Archibald Allan Bowman and his wife Mabel, will be published by the University of Glasgow on the centenary of the day they were first written.

Physics - Social Sciences - 03.04.2018
Researchers develop infrared-based system to read body language
Researchers develop infrared-based system to read body language
Infrared sensors and a marshmallow offer researchers a new way to monitor and assess social interaction. The ability to use invisible light to determine someone's role and attitude in social settings has powerful implications for individuals and organisations that are concerned about how they communicate.

Social Sciences - Continuing Education - 27.03.2018
Grammar schools could be damaging to social mobility
Grammar schools could be damaging to social mobility
Grammar schools are no better or worse than non-selective state schools in terms of attainment, but can be damaging to social mobility, according to new research by Durham University. The researchers say a policy of increasing selection within the schools system is dangerous for equality in society.

Social Sciences - 26.03.2018
The Value of Foodbanks Extends Well Beyond the Food
The value of foodbanks goes well beyond the food they provide, offering social contact and a safe place where users find care, dignity and respect, according to new research released today by the University of Glasgow. Conducted by the University's GoWell Programme, the research examined the scale of food bank use in 15 communities in Glasgow, each of which lie within the 15% most deprived in Scotland.

Social Sciences - 21.03.2018
Children in lower social classes are up to 5kg heavier than more advantaged peers, new study finds
Children in lower social classes are up to 5kg heavier than more advantaged peers, new study finds
Disadvantaged children born at the start of the 21st century weighed up to 5kg more in their childhood and early teenage years than those from more privileged backgrounds, a new UCL study has found. However, in previous generations lower social class was associated with lower childhood and adolescent weight.

Law / Forensics - Social Sciences - 09.03.2018
More vulnerable male adults are victims of forced marriage than previously thought
38/18 A higher number of men with learning disabilities are victims of forced marriage than previously thought, suggesting that better education and training is needed to recognise those at risk. This was just one of the findings of the new study - ‘ My Marriage, My Choice' which shows that there appears to have been a reversal in trends related to gender, with more cases of men with learning disabilities now being reported than those of women.

Health - Social Sciences - 08.03.2018
Cultural barriers to tackling the superbug crisis
Research led by the University of Oxford has revealed how the complex cultural and social environment in developing countries can complicate the use of new diagnostic technologies to fight the global superbug crisis. The research, led by Dr Marco J Haenssgen at the CABDyN Complexity Centre and the Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health,  involved a new finger-prick blood test (C-reactive protein) to help nurses and doctors decide whether their patients need antibiotic treatment.

Psychology - Social Sciences - 05.03.2018
Dying for the group: what motivates the ultimate sacrifice?
Whether idolised as heroes or demonised and labelled terrorists, throughout history people have been willing to die for their groups and the causes they believe in. But why?  Previous theories of extreme self-sacrifice have revealed that a range of factors fuel the decision, including collective identity, hostility from others outside of the group, kin psychology and in some cases diminished mental health and depression.

Social Sciences - 30.01.2018
Safeguarding children when sentencing mothers
Oxford University have collaborated with the Prison Reform Trust to create new resources, including films and briefings, to help criminal justice professionals improve their understanding of the impacts of maternal imprisonment. Image credit: Shutterstock Oxford University has collaborated with the Prison Reform Trust to create new resources, including films and briefings, to help criminal justice professionals improve their understanding of the impacts of maternal imprisonment.

Social Sciences - Health - 25.01.2018
Racism linked to uptake of smoking in young people
Racism linked to uptake of smoking in young people
Adolescents who have experienced some form of racism between the ages of 11 and 23 are more likely to take up smoking than those who have not, according to a new study led by King's College London involving UCL.  The study, analysed questionnaire and interview data from the Determinants of young Adult Social well-being and Health (DASH) study, the UK's largest longitudinal study of ethnically diverse young people.