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Social Sciences - Life Sciences - 28.09.2018
Bold male birds fall faster and harder for their partners
Research from Oxford University has revealed that bold male birds focus on forming strong relationships with their future breeding partners while shy male birds play the field. A new study from the Department of Zoology, Oxford University, has found that the individual personalities of male great tits influences how they bond with their future breeding partner.

Social Sciences - 10.09.2018
New data reveals scale of drug and alcohol finds in Welsh prisons
Cardiff University's Wales Governance Centre has presented new findings on drugs, alcohol and homelessness to the House of Commons' Welsh Affairs Committee. The Committee held an evidence session at the National Assembly in Cardiff as part of its inquiry into prison provision in Wales. The Wales Governance Centre's Dr Robert Jones was questioned by MPs on the new data and on his previous Imprisonment in Wales Factfile.

Psychology - Social Sciences - 21.08.2018
New research sheds light on why suicide is more common in autistic people
People who hide their autism by ‘camouflaging' to try to fit into society, or who don't receive correct support are at higher risk of suicide, according to new research. Researchers from the University of Nottingham's School of Psychology and the Universities of Coventry and Cambridge worked closely with a group of autistic people who had experienced mental health problems, self-injury or thoughts of ending life, to design a new innovative study that has just been published in the journal Molecular Autism.

Social Sciences - 20.08.2018
Understanding urban issues through credit cards
Understanding urban issues through credit cards
Digital traces from credit card and mobile phone usage can be used to map urban lifestyles and understand human mobility, according to a report led by UCL, MIT and UC Berkeley. Credit Card Records (CCRs) are currently used to measure similarities in purchasing activity, but for the first time researchers have used the data along with Call Detailed Records (CDRs) to understand the daily rhythms of human mobility and communication.

Psychology - Social Sciences - 13.08.2018
Cycling is the healthiest way to get around cities
Cycling has been found to bring both the best physical and mental health benefits in a study carried out in seven European cities. People who cycled in cities were found to have better self-perceived general health, better mental health, greater vitality, lower self-perceived stress and fewer feelings of loneliness.

Health - Social Sciences - 10.08.2018
Men take care of their spouses just as well as women
Men take care of their spouses just as well as women
Men respond to their spouse's illness just as much as women do and as a result are better caregivers in later life than previous research suggests, according to a new Oxford University collaboration. Men respond to their spouse's illness just as much as women do and as a result are better caregivers in later life than previous research suggests, according to a new Oxford University collaboration.

Social Sciences - Life Sciences - 09.08.2018
'Believing you're a winner' gives men a testosterone boost and promiscuous disposition
’Believing you’re a winner’ gives men a testosterone boost and promiscuous disposition
New findings suggest that the male body tries to "optimise" self-perceived improvements in social status through hormonal shifts that promote "short-term mating". Our results show that both testosterone and its corresponding psychological effects can fluctuate quickly and opportunistically Danny Longman A new study shows that men only have to believe they've bested another man in competition to get raised testosterone levels and an inflated sense of their own value as a sexual prospect.

Health - Social Sciences - 08.08.2018
Likelihood of dementia higher among black ethnic groups
Likelihood of dementia higher among black ethnic groups
Rates of dementia diagnosis are higher among black ethnic groups compared to white and Asian groups in the UK, a new UCL-led study has found. The study, published in Clinical Epidemiology , is the first to compare incidence of dementia diagnosis by ethnicity in any nationally representative sample. Researchers from UCL and King's College London analysed data from 2,511,681 people, including 66,083 who had a dementia diagnosis, from The Health Improvement Network primary care database between 2007 and 2015.

Social Sciences - Sport Sciences - 07.08.2018
Football used as scapegoat for domestic violence
Football used as scapegoat for domestic violence
7 August 2018 Scapegoating football as a trigger for domestic violence trivialises the issue and risks offering offenders an excuse for their behaviour, according to a UK study. Reports linking a spike in cases with the outcome of Old Firm games and England's World Cup performance lack reliable data and fail to recognise abuse is a pattern of ongoing behaviour.

Social Sciences - Politics - 01.08.2018
Differences in social status and politics encourage paranoid thinking
Differences in social status and political belief increase paranoid interpretations of other people's actions, finds a new UCL experimental study. Paranoia is the tendency to assume other people are trying to harm you when their actual motivations are unclear, and this tendency is increased when interacting with someone of a higher social status or opposing political beliefs, according to the study published today in Royal Society Open Science .

Innovation / Technology - Social Sciences - 01.08.2018
Finding innovative solutions to fuel poverty
A team at Cardiff University is working to address the issue of fuel poverty in Wales. The Understanding Risk group, which brings together staff from the Schools of Psychology and Social Sciences, is leading Fair Futures, a Welsh Government commissioned project, with the Energy Systems Catapult as partner.

Social Sciences - Philosophy - 26.07.2018
New research uncovers successes and failures of UK’s help for Syrian immigrants
Syrian refugees have higher levels of unemployment than UK citizens, are often overqualified for work they do find, and are being underserved by current British immigration policy despite their eagerness to contribute to society, new research reveals. A new report from a multidisciplinary research team at the University of Glasgow, supported by the Global Challenges Research Fund, offers unique insight into the lives of Syrian refugees based in the UK and how their experiences compare with refugees settled in Lebanon and Greece.

Business / Economics - Social Sciences - 26.07.2018
Parents inclined to invest more, if child attends better quality school
Parents consider that spending money on learning resources such as books, educational games and private tuition for their children is more productive if the child attends a higher quality school, according to new research led by UCL. The study, which recently came out as a Human Capital and Economic Opportunity ( HCEO) Working Paper, was funded by the Nuffield Foundation.

Business / Economics - Social Sciences - 20.07.2018
Immigrant pupils more likely to think school can help them succeed than UK-born peers
Pupils who have immigrated to the UK have a significantly more positive attitude towards school than their peers whose parents were born here, new research has revealed. Experts from the University of Bristol and the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) analysed data from over 4,500 pupils aged 15 and 16 in 204 schools in England* and found immigration status is a key driver of attitude.

Pedagogy - Social Sciences - 20.07.2018
Young people who frequently argue with their parents are better citizens, research finds
Teenagers who regularly clash with their parents are more likely to have given time to a charity or humanitarian cause, a study has shown. The survey of 13 and 14 year-olds carried out by academics at Cardiff University, showed those who argued “a lot” with their mother and father, compared to those who “never” argued, were also more likely to have been involved with a human rights organisation in the past 12 months and to have contacted a politician or signed a petition.

Social Sciences - 17.07.2018
Suicide must not appear to be the only escape for some victims of abuse, warns new study
In one of the largest studies of its kind, and the first in the UK, experts from Refuge and the University of Warwick School of Law looked at the experiences of more than 3500 of Refuge's clients with the aim of informing policy and practice in relation to victims of abuse who are at an increased risk of suicide.

Innovation / Technology - Social Sciences - 13.07.2018
One dose of aspirin doesn't fit all
One dose of aspirin doesn’t fit all
The struggle to shape the experiences young people have online is now part of modern parenthood. As children and teenagers spend increasing amounts of time online, a significant share of parents and guardians now use Internet filtering tools (such as parental controls) to protect their children from accessing sexual material online.

Social Sciences - 12.07.2018
UCL statement on Tier 4 visa monitoring
In response to an incorrect and unauthorised email that was sent to some staff in one department regarding UCL's policy on monitoring of Tier 4 students, a UCL spokesperson said: "Fines for non-compliance with Tier 4 monitoring is not UCL policy. The communication was issued in error by a member of staff and has been retracted with an apology.

Social Sciences - Sport Sciences - 26.06.2018
Citizen scientists capture penguin breeding dynamics
As World Cup fever sets in, increased hooliganism and football related violence are legitimate international concerns. Previous research has linked sports-related hooliganism to 'social maladjustment' e.g. previous episodes of violence or dysfunctional behaviour at home, work or school etc.

Social Sciences - Sport Sciences - 22.06.2018
Social bonding key cause of football violence
As World Cup fever sets in, increased hooliganism and football related violence are legitimate international concerns. Previous research has linked sports-related hooliganism to 'social maladjustment' e.g. previous episodes of violence or dysfunctional behaviour at home, work or school etc.