« BACK

Physics



Results 1 - 20 of 782.
1 2 3 4 5 ... 40 Next »


Physics - 22.02.2019
Physicists get thousands of semiconductor nuclei to do 'quantum dances' in unison
Physicists get thousands of semiconductor nuclei to do ’quantum dances’ in unison
A team of Cambridge researchers have found a way to control the sea of nuclei in semiconductor quantum dots so they can operate as a quantum memory device.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 20.02.2019
Cosmic dust forms in supernovae blasts
Scientists claim to have solved a longstanding mystery as to how cosmic dust, the building blocks of stars and planets, forms across the Universe. Cosmic dust contains tiny fragments or organic material and is spread out across the Universe. The dust is primarily formed in stars and is then blown off in a slow wind or a massive star explosion.

Materials Science - Physics - 14.02.2019
Solar-powered supercapacitors could create flexible, wearable electronics
A breakthrough in energy storage technology could bring a new generation of flexible electronic devices to life, including solar-powered prosthetics for amputees. In a new paper published in the journal Advanced Science , a team of engineers from the University of Glasgow discuss how they have used layers of graphene and polyurethane to create a flexible supercapacitor which can generate power from the sun and store excess energy for later use.

Physics - 12.02.2019
The more the merrier for physical group tasks, says new study
A new study has found that larger groups could be better than small groups at physical tasks when they are connected by touch. Researchers from the Tokyo Institute of Technology , Imperial College London, and the University of Tokyo have tested coordination in groups of two, three and four humans when they communicated by touch - known as haptic communication.

Physics - 11.02.2019
New light thrown on hunt for MH370
New insights into the behaviour of underwater sound waves has identified two new possible locations where the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 might have impacted with the ocean. Researchers at Cardiff University have put forward these alternate locations based on new calculations of the interaction of acoustic gravity waves with the elasticity, or flexibility, of the sea floor.

Physics - Innovation / Technology - 06.02.2019
Quantum leap
Cambridge researchers are devising new methods to keep sensitive information out of the hands of hackers. They launched the UK's first 'unhackable' network - made safe by the "laws of physics" - in 2018. It's really important to get this right as it's our first chance to start doing very detailed studies and see how these systems really work in the field Ian White When buying an item online, we voluntarily hand over our credit card information.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 04.02.2019
Giant impacts caused by interplanetary collisions
Giant impacts caused by interplanetary collisions
Astronomers have found fresh evidence for significant planetary diversity within a single exoplanet system, suggesting that giant high-speed collisions are partly responsible for planetary evolution. An international team of scientists led by Italy's National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF) and involving physicists from the University of Bristol spent three years observing the exoplanetary system Kepler-107 via the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo in La Palma.

Physics - Electroengineering - 01.02.2019
’Magnetic graphene’ switches between insulator and conductor
Researchers have found that certain ultra-thin magnetic materials can switch from insulator to conductor under high pressure, a phenomenon that could be used in the development of next-generation electronics and memory storage devices.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 31.01.2019
Knighthood for groundbreaking UofG astrophysicist
A pioneering University of Glasgow researcher who helped deliver the historic first detection of gravitational waves has received a knighthood in recognition of his contribution to physics and astronomy. James Hough, Research Professor in Natural Philosophy in the School of Physics and Astronomy, was made a Knight Bachelor of the British Empire by the Duke of Cambridgeduring a ceremony at Buckingham Palace today (Thursday 31 January).

Life Sciences - Physics - 29.01.2019
’Light tweezers’ can move, melt, and scatter mysterious biological ’icebergs’
For the first time, scientists have used light beams to manipulate lipid rafts in artificial cell membranes. Lipid rafts are domains, or areas, of protein and lipid (fats) which float freely in cell membranes - the protein and lipid layer that surrounds a cell. These structures, which float in the membranes like icebergs, play important but mysterious roles in cellular signalling that aren't yet fully explained.

Physics - 25.01.2019
New theory sends temperatures to new lows
Researchers have developed a new theory for recording the lowest temperatures ever measured, with the largest accuracy allowed by the laws of Nature. This line of research holds promise to revolutionise low-temperature physics and could find a plethora of applications in emerging quantum technologies.

Chemistry - Physics - 23.01.2019
Fine tuning for clean energy
An international collaboration between researchers in Spain and Scotland has resulted in a new approach to improve the catalysts needed to carry out the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction (HER). The reaction, in which water is transformed into hydrogen and oxygen, is a promising alternative to humanity's dependency on fossil fuels to satisfy energy requirements.

Physics - 22.01.2019
3D printing and metals science combine for stronger, crystal-inspired materials
Imperial materials scientists have created new artificial materials which combine our knowledge of metals with 3D printing. The findings could speed up the use of 3D printed materials in everything from construction and vehicles to medical devices. 3D printing is often used to produce engineering components.

Chemistry - Physics - 18.01.2019
Bringing electricity and chemistry together with a 1.6M project
Bringing electricity and chemistry together with a 1.6M project
Dr Clotilde Cucinotta is trying to solve the combined electrical and chemical problem, paving the way for next-generation energy sources. Dr Cucinotta joined Imperial this year, bringing an EPSRC grant of more than 1.6 million and a wide range of experience. We talked to her about her research, her journey so far, and why the Molecular Sciences Research Hub - the new home for Chemistry at Imperial's White City campus - is the best place to carry out her plans.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 03.01.2019
Groovy young rock stars and the Holy Grail
Will a telescopic Census of thousands of planets help to pinpoint a new Earth? For Professor Jane Greaves, such a discovery will be the ‘Holy Grail' - the culmination of a career spent observing planets forming around young stars. At the heart of the study, interpreting data on raw material ‘remnants' from comet collisions around stars like the Sun will be the key to success.

Physics - Pharmacology - 31.12.2018
The 10 most popular Imperial news stories of 2018
The past 12 months have provided many eye-grabbing headlines from the Imperial community, from world-leading research to incredible innovations. Before 2019 is upon us, we take a quick look back at the most popular articles on our award-winning news site (ranked by the number of page views). Here are our top 10 stories of 2018.

Physics - 12.12.2018
Networking goes quantum
Networking goes quantum
A scientist involved in expanding quantum communication to a network of users, is continuing his work at the University of Bristol. The enhanced cyber security offered by quantum communication has been historically limited to two partner exchanges, now for the first-time scientists have connected multiple users simultaneously on a quantum encrypted network without using trusted nodes.

Physics - Materials Science - 10.12.2018
Answering the mystery of what atoms do when liquids and gases meet
Answering the mystery of what atoms do when liquids and gases meet
How atoms arrange themselves at the smallest scale was thought to follow a 'drum-skin' rule, but mathematicians have now found a simpler solution. Atomic arrangements in different materials can provide a lot of information about the properties of materials, and what the potential is for altering what they can be used for.

Physics - Life Sciences - 03.12.2018
Nanoscale tweezers can perform single-molecule ’biopsies’ on individual cells
Using electrical impulses, the 'tweezers' can extract single DNA, proteins and organelles from living cells without destroying them. We are continuously expanding our knowledge on how cells function, but many unanswered questions remain. This is especially true for individual cells that are of the same type, such as brain, muscle or fat cells, but have very different compositions at the single-molecule level.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 03.12.2018
LIGO and Virgo announce four new gravitational-wave detections
University of Glasgow physicists are closing out 2018 with the publication of a wealth of new gravitational wave data collected during the first two observing runs of the LIGO and Virgo detectors. video In a new paper just published online, scientists from the LIGO and Virgo research collaborations present data from a total of 10 stellar-mass binary black hole mergers and one merger of neutron stars.
1 2 3 4 5 ... 40 Next »