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Pharmacology



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Health - Pharmacology - 21.02.2019
New care package can improve treatment of people with acute kidney injury
A large clinical trial involving people with acute kidney injury has found that a new package of interventions can significantly improve the diagnosis and treatment of patients, as well as improving their care experience. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a sudden or rapid decline in kidney function that can lead to hospital admission, longer hospital stays, increased mortality risk and long-term kidney damage.

Pharmacology - Health - 20.02.2019
Long-term benefits from intensive therapy in early stages of MS
New findings by researchers at Cardiff University suggest that intensive therapy during the early stages of multiple sclerosis (MS) leads to better long-term outcomes for patients, despite it often being viewed as a riskier option than other first line treatments. Dr Emma Tallantyre, from Cardiff University's Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences, said: “Over the last 10-20 years we have seen huge advances in the treatment of relapsing-remitting MS, with over 12 licensed medications having been shown to suppress disease activity.

Health - Pharmacology - 19.02.2019
Seeing the unseeable
Researchers at Cardiff University have used x-ray crystallography and computer simulation to get a closer look at how viruses bind cells and cause infection. The new insight could help in the development of drugs and therapies for infections and further advance the exploitation of viruses for medical treatments.

Health - Pharmacology - 19.02.2019
World's first gene therapy operation for common cause of sight loss carried out
World’s first gene therapy operation for common cause of sight loss carried out
Researchers in Oxford have carried out the world's first gene therapy operation to tackle the root cause of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the UK's most common cause of sight loss. The procedure was carried out at the John Radcliffe Hospital by Professor Robert MacLaren, Professor of Ophthalmology at the University of Oxford, with the support of the NIHR Oxford Biomedical Research Centre in a clinical trial sponsored by Gyroscope Therapeutics, a UK-based company developing genetically-defined therapies for the treatment of eye diseases.

Health - Pharmacology - 15.02.2019
Artificial intelligence can predict survival of ovarian cancer patients
Artificial intelligence can predict survival of ovarian cancer patients
Researchers have created new machine learning software that can forecast the survival rates and response to treatments of patients with ovarian cancer The artificial intelligence software, created by researchers at Imperial College London and the University of Melbourne , has been able to predict the prognosis of patients with ovarian cancer more accurately than current methods.

Pharmacology - Chemistry - 11.02.2019
Machine learning algorithm helps in the search for new drugs
Researchers have designed a machine learning algorithm for drug discovery which has been shown to be twice as efficient as the industry standard, which could accelerate the process of developing new treatments for disease. The ability to fish out four active molecules from six million is like finding a needle in a haystack Alpha Lee The researchers, led by the University of Cambridge, used their algorithm to identify four new molecules that activate a protein which is thought to be relevant for symptoms of Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia.

Health - Pharmacology - 06.02.2019
Researchers awarded 1.3 million to fight prostate cancer
Researchers awarded 1.3 million to fight prostate cancer
Prostate Cancer UK has awarded researchers over £1.3 million for three projects that could lead to new treatments for the disease. The Research Innovation Awards is a prestigious scheme aimed at funding the most impactful research in prostate cancer. The number of prostate cancer cases is increasing in the UK - the condition kills over 11,000 men every year - and research is desperately needed to find new ways of tackling the disease.

Health - Pharmacology - 31.01.2019
Statin therapy reduces cardiovascular disease risk in older people
Statin therapy reduces major vascular events, such as heart attacks and strokes, in people of all ages, including those over the age of 75, according to a new study published in The Lancet. The study assessed the effects of statins in nearly 187,000 people who had taken part in 28 large clinical trials.

Pharmacology - Health - 29.01.2019
New target for gastric cancer therapies
New target for gastric cancer therapies
Cardiff University researchers have uncovered new information about the underlying mechanisms for gastric cancer, providing hope of potential new therapies in the future. The team, at the University's European Cancer Stem Cell Research Institute, found they could stop gastric cells dividing and growing by deleting a particular cell-surface receptor implicated in the function of stem cells.

Health - Pharmacology - 28.01.2019
Hepatitis C programmes could save 1.5 million deaths by 2030
Hepatitis C programmes could save 1.5 million deaths by 2030
Imperial scientists have published the first global estimates to determine the impact of improved prevention, diagnosis and treatment for hepatitis C. A comprehensive package of prevention, screening, and treatment interventions could avert 15.1 million new hepatitis C infections and 1.5 million cirrhosis and liver cancer deaths globally by 2030 - equal to an 81% reduction in incidence and a 61% reduction in deaths compared with 2015, according to the first study to model hepatitis C interventions globally published in The Lancet.

Health - Pharmacology - 28.01.2019
Phone or video call therapy improves health anxiety and saves money
A new study by mental health experts has found that easy-access, remotely-delivered psychological treatment can significantly reduce extreme health anxiety in people who repeatedly go to the doctor, or hospital emergency departments.

Health - Pharmacology - 24.01.2019
New kidney research sheds light on harms of certain drugs
New kidney research sheds light on harms of certain drugs
Scientists have identified an enzyme that is a "master regulator" of kidney function that if excessively suppressed, can trigger renal failure. Their findings have implications for the use of existing drugs and the development of new pharmaceuticals. As reported , a global research team led by the University of Bristol studied how the activity of the enzyme GSK3 (Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3) affects the function of podocyte cells, which are crucial in enabling the kidneys to filter blood.

Health - Pharmacology - 24.01.2019
Needle and syringe programmes are highly cost-effective at preventing hepatitis C transmission
Needle and syringe programmes are highly cost-effective at preventing hepatitis C transmission
Providing clean injecting equipment through needle and syringe programmes is a highly cost-effective way of preventing hepatitis C (HCV) transmission among people who inject drugs and could save millions of pounds in infection treatment costs in the UK, according to research led by the University of Bristol and London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.

Health - Pharmacology - 17.01.2019
Finds elevated levels of stress hormone linked to housing type and tenure
A new study examining UK housing data and health outcomes has indicated a link between people living in the private rental sector having higher levels of a stress hormone. The findings, led by researchers at the Universities of Bristol and Essex, are published in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.

Pharmacology - Health - 15.01.2019
Elephantiasis and river blindness could be eliminated faster with new molecule
A new potential drug molecule could reduce treatment times for two widespread diseases from weeks to days, ultimately helping to eliminate them. The new molecule has been designed to more effectively target and kill the cause of elephantiasis and river blindness while having potentially fewer side effects.

Pharmacology - Health - 14.01.2019
University launches first-of-its-kind equipment to transform imaging of cells, tissues and materials
The University of Nottingham is the first university in the world to own and operate unique equipment which allows label-free chemical imaging of materials, cells and tissues, with the potential to transform research in these areas. The new 3DOrbiSIMS is the first production instrument of its kind and will have applications in a multi-disciplinary range of research areas, including biomedical implants, drug delivery systems, developing strategies to tackle antimicrobial resistance, organic electronic devices and engineering applications.

Pharmacology - Health - 14.01.2019
New report reveals stark north south divide in painkiller prescribing
A new report has revealed that patients in the north of the country are being prescribed almost four times more opioids to relieve pain than those in the south. The research by the University of Nottingham's School of Pharmacy and the University of Manchester is the first national study to examine the regional variations in opioid prescribing and how this links with socioeconomic status.

Pharmacology - Health - 11.01.2019
Discreet contraception for world’s poorest countries
Innovative microneedle technology is being developed as an effective, pain-free and discreet method of delivering contraception across the world's poorest countries, thanks to a new research consortium led by Cardiff University and supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The project will focus on pre-clinical work to develop microneedle patches that have the potential to be painlessly and inconspicuously administered by the user themselves within a few seconds and can last for up to six months.

Health - Pharmacology - 09.01.2019
HRT tablets increase risk of blood clots in women
Women who use certain types of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) are at a higher risk of developing potentially life-threatening blood clots, new research has confirmed. The study, undertaken by researchers at The University of Nottingham and published in the BMJ , found that the risk of developing blood clots was only increased for women using HRT in tablet form and was slightly higher for higher dosages.

Health - Pharmacology - 07.01.2019
Automated phone calls may help patients to take medicines as prescribed, pilot study suggests
Automated phone calls may help patients to take medicines as prescribed, pilot study suggests
Remembering to take medication is vital for managing long term health conditions such as high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, or multiple conditions. Latest research from the University of Cambridge suggests that using interactive voice response (IVR) technology supports patients to take their medicine as prescribed.