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Pedagogy - Health - 10.08.2018
Men take care of their spouses just as well as women
Men respond to their spouse's illness just as much as women do and as a result are better caregivers in later life than previous research suggests, according to a new Oxford University collaboration. Men respond to their spouse's illness just as much as women do and as a result are better caregivers in later life than previous research suggests, according to a new Oxford University collaboration.

Pedagogy - Social Sciences - 20.07.2018
Young people who frequently argue with their parents are better citizens, research finds
Teenagers who regularly clash with their parents are more likely to have given time to a charity or humanitarian cause, a study has shown. The survey of 13 and 14 year-olds carried out by academics at Cardiff University, showed those who argued “a lot” with their mother and father, compared to those who “never” argued, were also more likely to have been involved with a human rights organisation in the past 12 months and to have contacted a politician or signed a petition.

Pedagogy - Health - 12.06.2018
Mother's attitude towards baby during pregnancy may have implications for child's development
Mother’s attitude towards baby during pregnancy may have implications for child’s development
Mothers who 'connect' with their baby during pregnancy are more likely to interact in a more positive way with their infant after it is born, according to a study carried out at the University of Cambridge. Interaction is important for helping infants learn and develop. Although we found a relationship between a mother's attitude towards her baby during pregnancy and her later interactions, this link was only modest.

Pedagogy - Business / Economics - 05.06.2018
Immigrant and disadvantaged children benefit most from early childcare
Immigrant and disadvantaged children benefit most from early childcare
Attending universal childcare from age three significantly improves the school readiness of children from immigrant and disadvantaged family backgrounds, a new UCL study has found.† However, the research by the Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), shows the same universal childcare, only has a modest impact on the school readiness of children from advantaged backgrounds.† The study, which looked at German school entry exam data, also shows that immigrant children and children from disadvantaged backgrounds are less likely to attend childcare at age three.

Health - Pedagogy - 05.04.2018
Three-quarters of COPD cases are linked to childhood risk factors that are exacerbated in adulthood
Three-quarters of COPD cases are linked to childhood risk factors that are exacerbated in adulthood
Three-quarters of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) cases have their origins in poor lung function pathways beginning in childhood. These pathways are associated with exposures in childhood, and amplified by factors in adulthood, according to a cohort study published in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine journal.

Pedagogy - 06.09.2017
Schools "teaching in ’ability’ sets despite evidence this may cause harm
Schools are rejecting the chance to teach children in "mixed-ability" classes despite evidence that the alternative - pupils being put in ability sets or streams - will have a negative effect on at least some of their charges' results, according to new research from UCL. The paper - "Factors deterring schools from mixed attainment grouping practices," written by Dr Becky Taylor, UCL Institute of Education (IOE), together with academics from Queen's University, Belfast, was presented yesterday at the British Educational Research Association's (BERA) annual conference.

Pedagogy - Health - 31.08.2017
Children’s sleep quality linked to mothers’ insomnia
Children sleep more poorly if their mothers suffer from insomnia symptoms - potentially affecting their mental wellbeing and development - according to new research by the University of Warwick and the University of Basel.

Pedagogy - Media - 29.08.2017
Apps ‘don't affect children's language development' if parents still read stories
Apps ‘don’t affect children’s language development’ if parents still read stories
Watching television or playing with smart phone apps does not have any effect on children's language development - providing they still spend time reading, researchers have found. A study from the University of Salford and Lancaster University, published in the Journal Of Children And Media , has found that as long as parents or carers spend time reading with young children, and this time is not reduced in place of television or touchscreen devices such as iPads, children's exposure to these media should have no effect on the size of their vocabulary.

Pedagogy - Health - 20.08.2017
Health benefits from lone parents welfare to work policies unlikely
Improvements in health have been used to justify mandating employment for lone parents, but new research shows that their health is unlikely to improve under these measures. The Cochrane Review, which is published today, was led by Dr Marcia Gibson from the MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, University of Glasgow.

Pedagogy - 21.06.2017
When estimating extinction risk, don't leave out the males
When estimating extinction risk, don’t leave out the males
Extinction risk for some species could be drastically underestimated because most demographic models of animal populations only analyse the number and fertility of females, dismissing male data as ‘noise'. An international team of researchers, including a PhD student and a professor from the Milner Centre for Evolution at the University of Bath, found that population growth in birds was very sensitive to the ratio of males to females in a population, called the adult sex ratio (ASR), which has previously been shown to affect mating behaviour.

Pedagogy - Social Sciences - 25.05.2017
IVF babies do not have lower cognitive skills than naturally conceived children
New research shows that between the ages of three and 11, children conceived artificially can be linked with better scores for reading and verbal tests than children conceived naturally.† Researchers analysed data of hundreds of UK children who had been born through IVF or ICSI (when the man has a low sperm count), testing the same groups of children every few years up to the age of 11.

Pedagogy - 28.03.2017
If at first you don't succeed: Why repetition may hold key to helping children with specific language impairment
If at first you don’t succeed: Why repetition may hold key to helping children with specific language impairment
If at first you don't succeed: Why repetition may hold key to helping children with specific language impairment Simple repetition learning techniques could help young children struggling with language to learn vocabulary faster, according to the latest research from scientists from the UK and Germany.

Health - Pedagogy - 08.03.2017
Parental concerns reduce uptake of child flu vaccine
The first study investigating parental attitudes towards the UK's child flu vaccine has found concerns about safety and side effects may negatively influence uptake, and recommends that public health messages need to be reinforced. Led by King's College London and published today in Vaccine , the research shows that not having the vaccine was associated with concerns about its safety, short-term side effects and long-term health problems.

Health - Pedagogy - 17.01.2017
Eating disorders are affecting more UK women in their 40s and 50s than expected, finds new study
Eating disorders are affecting more UK women in their 40s and 50s than expected, finds new study
In a UK study of 5,320 women, three per cent were found to have an active eating disorder in mid-life, a figure higher than expected as eating disorders are primarily associated with adolescence or early adulthood. The research, using data from the University of Bristol's Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children cohort, is published in the open access journal BMC Medicine.

Life Sciences - Pedagogy - 14.10.2016
Toddlers' food fussiness is heavily influenced by genes
Toddlers’ food fussiness is heavily influenced by genes
Toddlers' fussy eating habits are mainly the result of genetic influences rather than the result of poor parenting, according to new research led by scientists at UCL. The research, published in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry , investigated to what extent genes and environmental factors can explain why some children tend to refuse to try new foods or are very selective about what foods they eat.

Health - Pedagogy - 03.10.2016
Motion tests suggest car seats not necessarily safe for infants
Motion tests suggest car seats not necessarily safe for infants
Newborn infants may be at risk of breathing difficulties if left in car safety seats for long periods, particularly when travelling, new research from the University of Bristol has shown. Most UK hospitals require premature infants to complete a ‘car seat challenge' before discharge. Infants are observed for breathing difficulties or changes in heart rate while in a car seat.

Pedagogy - 22.04.2016
Gender stereotyping may start as young as three months, study of babies' cries shows
Gender stereotyping may start as young as three months, study of babies’ cries shows
Gender stereotyping may start as young as three months, study of babies' cries shows Gender stereotyping may start as young as three months, according to a study of babies' cries from the University of Sussex. Adults attribute degrees of femininity and masculinity to babies based on the pitch of their cries, as shown by a new study by researchers from the University of Sussex, the University of Lyon/Saint-Etienne and Hunter College City University of New York.

Pedagogy - 11.04.2016
’Parents know best about effects of video games on children’
A study has found that parents who reported playing video games with their children are about three times more likely to have a handle on the effects gaming have on young people as compared with adults who are not parents and those who have never played.† The research by the University of Oxford and Cardiff University looks at how the actual experience of playing video games may affect people's attitudes on their benefits and potential harm.

Health - Pedagogy - 22.03.2016
Parental conflict damages children's mental health and life chances
Parental conflict damages children’s mental health and life chances
Parental conflict damages children's mental health and life chances Children's exposure to conflict between their parents - whether parents are together or separated - can put children's mental health and long-term life chances at risk, new research warns today (Tuesday 22 March). A review carried out by the Early Intervention Foundation ( EIF ) and Professor Gordon Harold , of the University of Sussex, for the Department for Work and Pensions found that children's wellbeing can be affected by the quality of the parental relationship.

Health - Pedagogy - 09.03.2016
Communication is key for clinicians when it comes to viral illness
Communication is key for clinicians when it comes to viral illness
Clinicians tend to use language that minimises the severity of viral illness in children with respiratory tract infections (RTIs), a new study has found. The University of Bristol study, funded by the Scientific Foundation Board of the Royal College of General Practitioners looked at communication between doctors and parents about antibiotic prescribing for children with cough.
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