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Mechanical Engineering - Physics - 22.06.2018
What causes the sound of a dripping tap - and how do you stop it?
Scientists have solved the riddle behind one of the most recognisable, and annoying, household sounds: the dripping tap. And crucially, they have also identified a simple solution to stop it, which most of us already have in our kitchens. We were all surprised that no one had actually answered the question of what causes the sound.

Mechanical Engineering - Environment - 04.06.2018
Experts build pulsed air rig to test 3D printed parts for low carbon engines
Researchers designed a unique facility for testing 3D printed engine parts, to help reduce carbon emissions worldwide. The new Transient Air System Rig (TASR) was designed and built by Dr Aaron Costall and his team from Imperial College London's Department of Mechanical Engineering. The researchers hope it will help makers of large off-road and freight vehicles reduce the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) they produce.

Life Sciences - Mechanical Engineering - 14.02.2018
Acoustic blockage-detection system could prevent aircraft accidents
Acoustic blockage-detection system could prevent aircraft accidents
Pitots, which provide airspeed data, have played a role in several aircraft accidents, including the fatal Air France Flight 447 in 2009. New research by aerospace engineers at the University of Bristol has found that an acoustic blockage-detection system could prevent future accidents by making pilots aware of a blocked Pitot before a situation becomes critical.

Life Sciences - Mechanical Engineering - 14.02.2018
Tissue mechanics essential for cell movement
Cells that form facial features need surrounding embryonic tissues to stiffen so they can move and develop, according to new UCL-led research. The discovery has important implications for understanding the causes of facial defects which account for a third of all birth defects globally (3.2 million each year) and are the primary cause of infant mortality.

Life Sciences - Mechanical Engineering - 16.01.2018
How the temperature of your nose shows how much strain you are under
Researchers at the University of Nottingham's Institute for Aerospace Technology (IAT), together with academic staff from the Bioengineering and Human Factors Research Groups, have demonstrated that facial temperatures, which can be easily measured using a non-invasive thermal camera, are strongly correlated to mental workload.

Life Sciences - Mechanical Engineering - 08.01.2018
How bacteria turbocharged their motors
How bacteria turbocharged their motors
Using detailed 3D images, researchers have shown how bacteria have evolved molecular motors of different powers to optimize their swimming. The discovery, by a team from Imperial College London, provides insights into evolution at the molecular scale. Bacteria use molecular motors just tens of nanometres wide to spin a tail (or ‘flagellum') that pushes them through their habitat.

Mechanical Engineering - Physics - 31.08.2017
Motorised molecules drill into cancer cells
Motorised molecules drill into cancer cells
Motorised molecules driven by light have been used to drill holes in the membranes of individual cells, including cancerous ones. The technique shows promise for either bringing therapeutic agents into the cells or directly inducing the cells to die. Dr Robert Pal at Durham University worked with researchers at Rice and North Carolina State universities in the USA to demonstrate in laboratory tests how rotors in single-molecule nanomachines can be activated by ultraviolet light to spin at two to three million rotations per second and open membranes in cells.

Mechanical Engineering - 22.08.2017
Prototype technology for unearthing minefields with fire developed by team
Prototype technology for unearthing minefields with fire developed by team
Engineers have developed prototype technology that uses controlled burning to partially reveal landmines buried in peat soil. The researchers from Imperial College London have developed technology called O-Revealer that ignites peat, causing a smouldering fire that strips the upper layer of soil to reveal the landmines - making it easier to dispose of them.

Health - Mechanical Engineering - 31.05.2017
Motor neuron disease discovery offers new insights into potential treatment targets
Motor neuron disease discovery offers new insights into potential treatment targets
Scientists have discovered how certain forms of motor neuron disease begin and progress at cellular and molecular levels, revealing potential new ways to slow down or even stop this process. The team are already working closely with pharmaceutical companies to use this knowledge to develop new treatments for motor neuron disease and other neurodegenerative conditions.

Mechanical Engineering - Health - 15.09.2016
Touchscreens may improve motor skills in toddlers
A new study by researchers from King's College London and Birkbeck, University of London, has found that toddlers who use touchscreens may show improved fine motor control abilities. The use of touchscreens has increased rapidly in recent years, with statistics showing that in the UK alone, the number of touchscreen devices in the family home has increased from 7 per cent in 2011 to 71 per cent in 2014.

Mechanical Engineering - Electroengineering - 05.08.2016
Shape-changing metamaterial developed using Kirigami technique
Shape-changing metamaterial developed using Kirigami technique
Engineers from the University of Bristol have developed a new shape-changing metamaterial using Kirigami, which is the ancient Japanese art of cutting and folding paper to obtain 3D shapes. Metamaterials are a class of material engineered to produce properties that don't occur naturally. Currently metamaterials are used to make artificial electromagnetic and vibration absorbers and high-performance sensors.

Law / Forensics - Mechanical Engineering - 21.07.2016
Leonardo da Vinci’s irrelevant? scribbles mark the spot where he first recorded the laws of friction
A new detailed study of notes and sketches by Leonardo da Vinci has identified a page of scribbles in a tiny notebook as the place where Leonardo first recorded the laws of friction.

Mechanical Engineering - Environment - 28.04.2016
Wind turbine study measures small effect on local climate
Wind turbine study measures small effect on local climate
Newly published research has shown that the action of wind turbines has a measurable effect on the local climate. Researchers from Lancaster University, the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, National Centre for Atmospheric Science, the University of Glasgow, and the University of Leeds placed a grid of more than 100 temperature and humidity sensors around wind turbines at ScottishPower Renewables' Black Law Wind Farm in North Lanarkshire.

Mechanical Engineering - Environment - 22.04.2016
Windfarms generate microclimates with uncertain effects on peatland carbon store
The microclimates created by the action of wind farms is unlikely to affect the ability of peatland to capture carbon, scientists consider. Previous studies by other researchers have established that wind farms do create localised microclimates, with slightly different temperatures and levels of humidity caused by the action of the turbine blades.

Mechanical Engineering - 09.02.2016
A fifth of car fuel-efficiency savings are eroded by increased driving
A fifth of car fuel-efficiency savings are eroded by increased driving
A fifth of car fuel-efficiency savings are eroded by increased driving Around a fifth of the energy-saving benefits of fuel-efficient cars are eroded because people end up driving them more, according to a study into British motoring habits over the last 40 years. Using data from 1970 to 2011, energy experts at the University of Sussex found a long-term ‘rebound effect' among British car-drivers of around 20 per cent.

Mechanical Engineering - Environment - 05.02.2016
Motorboat noise gives predators a deadly advantage
Motorboat noise gives predators a deadly advantage
The rate that fish are captured by predators can double when boats are motoring nearby, according to pioneering work led by the University of Exeter and co-authored by the University of Bristol, published today in Nature. Dr Stephen Simpson of Exeter's Biosciences department and an international research team, including Bristol's Dr Andy Radford , found that noise from passing motorboats increases stress levels in young coral reef fish and reduces their ability to flee from predators.

Physics - Mechanical Engineering - 18.01.2016
It's a 3D printer, but not as we know it
It’s a 3D printer, but not as we know it
3D printing techniques have quickly become some of the most widely used tools to rapidly design and build new components. A team of engineers at the University of Bristol has developed a new type of 3D printing that can print composite materials, which are used in many high performance products such as tennis rackets, golf clubs and aeroplanes.

Environment - Mechanical Engineering - 27.11.2015
Earth's first ecosystems were more complex than previously thought, study finds
Earth’s first ecosystems were more complex than previously thought, study finds
Computer simulations have allowed scientists to work out how a puzzling 555-million-year-old organism with no known modern relatives fed, revealing that some of the first large, complex organisms on Earth formed ecosystems that were much more complex than previously thought. The international team of researchers from Canada, the UK and the USA, including Dr Imran Rahman from the University of Bristol, studied fossils of an extinct organism called Tribrachidium , which lived in the oceans some 555 million years ago.

Health - Mechanical Engineering - 27.11.2015
Cholesterol-lowering statins could help tackle breast cancer
Cholesterol-lowering statins could help tackle breast cancer
A new study by researchers from Imperial College London suggests statins could help fight hard-to-treat cancers. The research, published today , reveals that tumours rely heavily on cholesterol for growth. Cholesterol-lowering statins - which are currently prescribed to around 30 million people worldwide, can block this supply - causing it to ‘starve' and die.

Life Sciences - Mechanical Engineering - 11.11.2015
Power up: cockroaches employ a "force boost" to chew through tough materials
New research indicates that cockroaches use a combination of fast and slow twitch muscle fibres to give their mandibles a "force boost" that allows them to chew through tough materials.
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