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Life Sciences - 16.06.2019
Neuroscientists 3D model ’face identity information’ stored in the brain
In a world first, neuroscientists from the University of Glasgow have been able to construct 3D facial models using the unique information stored in an individual's brain when recalling the face of a familiar person. The study will be the cornerstone for greater understanding of the brain mechanisms of face identification, and could have applications for AI, gaming technology and eyewitness testimony.

Social Sciences - Life Sciences - 12.06.2019
Dolphins form friendships through shared interests just like us
Dolphins form friendships through shared interests just like us
When it comes to making friends, it appears dolphins are just like us and form close friendships with other dolphins that have a common interest. The findings, published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B by an international team of researchers from the Universities of Bristol, Zurich and Western Australia, provides further insight into the social habits of these remarkable animals.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.06.2019
Doctors question use of saline fluids to treat critically ill children
Doctors question use of saline fluids to treat critically ill children
Doctors have urged hospitals around the world to reconsider the type of fluids used to treat children gravely ill with sepsis. In a new study , researchers from Imperial College London found saline fluids commonly used to help stabilise critically ill children may trigger the blood to become more acidic, and lead to organ failure.

Life Sciences - 05.06.2019
Gene-edited chicken cells could leave flu with nowhere to hide
Scientists have used gene-editing techniques to stop the bird flu virus from spreading, in chicken cells grown in the lab. According to the team behind the work, the findings raise the possibility of producing gene-edited chickens that are resistant to flu. This could potentially prevent the birds from being a major reservoir for pandemic strains of the virus.

Health - Life Sciences - 04.06.2019
Zebrafish capture a 'window' on the cancer process
Zebrafish capture a ’window’ on the cancer process
Cancer-related inflammation impacts significantly on cancer development and progression. New research has observed in zebrafish, for the first time, that inflammatory cells use weak spots or micro-perforations in the extracellular matrix barrier layer to access skin cancer cells. The research, led by the University of Bristol and published in Cell Reports today [Tuesday 4 June] , used translucent zebrafish to model several sorts of skin cancer and live image how inflammatory cells find the growing cancer cells in the skin.

Life Sciences - Health - 04.06.2019
Gene mutation to cope with modern diets may help protect against diabetes
A common gene variant, which evolved in response to cooking and farming, helps some people cope with modern diets by keeping blood sugar low. However, new research on the gene reveals that close to half of the people studied still have an older variant that may be better suited to prehistoric diets and could make them more likely to develop type 2 diabetes.

Life Sciences - 04.06.2019
Could extra finger 'birth defect' provide blueprint for robotic extra limbs?
Could extra finger ’birth defect’ provide blueprint for robotic extra limbs?
New research on two people born with extra fingers has shown how the brain adapts to the workload imposed by more digits. Extra fingers and toes are traditionally seen as a birth defect, so nobody has thought to study how useful they might really be. Professor Etienne Burdet Department of Bioengineering The findings could show us how to tap into the brain's resources to control robotic extra limbs and digits.

Palaeontology - Life Sciences - 03.06.2019
Feathers came first, then birds
Feathers came first, then birds
New research, led by the University of Bristol, suggests that feathers arose 100 million years before birds - changing how we look at dinosaurs, birds, and pterosaurs, the flying reptiles. It also changes our understanding of feathers themselves, their functions and their role in some of the largest events in evolution.

Life Sciences - Sport Sciences - 03.06.2019
Progress in understanding dementia in footballers
Results of the largest study to date of the pathology of dementia in former footballers and rugby players have been revealed. ‌ In a study published in Acta Neuropathologica and led by the University of Glasgow in collaboration with the University of Pennsylvania, the researchers report that while a pathology associated with brain injury - chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) - might be common in former athletes with dementia, in many cases its clinical significance remains uncertain.

Environment - Life Sciences - 30.05.2019
Researchers identify how to find best and worse colours for camouflage
Researchers identify how to find best and worse colours for camouflage
Avoiding detection can provide significant survival advantages for prey, predators, or the military. For the first time, scientists from Bristol's Camo Lab have identified a new method to find the optimal colour to minimize or maximize detectability of a target. The study is published in a Royal Society Interface study.

Life Sciences - Health - 24.05.2019
Shows that mites and ticks are close relatives
Shows that mites and ticks are close relatives
Scientists from the University of Bristol and the Natural History Museum in London have reconstructed the evolutionary history of the chelicerates, the mega-diverse group of 110,000 arthropods that includes spiders, scorpions, mites and ticks. They found, for the first time, genomic evidence that mites and ticks do not constitute two distantly related lineages, rather they are part of the same evolutionary line.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.05.2019
Leaving school earlier could increase the risk of heart disease
Leaving school earlier could increase the risk of heart disease
Although it has been known for a long time, that education, and socioeconomic position affect health, particularly in later life, there was limited knowledge as to why. New research has found that increased levels of BMI, blood pressure and smoking partly explain why people who left school at an earlier age could be at an increased risk of heart disease.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.05.2019
More years spent in education associated with lower weight and blood pressure
Scientists have helped unravel the link between higher levels of education and reduced risk of heart attack and stroke. Previous research showed every 3.6 years spent in education can reduce a person's lifetime risk of heart disease by a third.

Physics - Life Sciences - 21.05.2019
Cells develop a 'thicker skin' under extreme gravity
Cells develop a ’thicker skin’ under extreme gravity
A high-gravity experiment has revealed how cells keep their shape under pressure. Scientists have probed how cells respond to high gravity with a technique that could transform how we look at cellular life. Using the European Space Agency's (ESA) Large Diameter Centrifuge in the Netherlands, Imperial and ESA researchers spun cells at high speeds that simulate a gravitational force 15 times stronger than on Earth (15g).

Life Sciences - Health - 21.05.2019
Head injury effects halted by xenon gas, finds first ever lifelong study in mice
Head injury effects halted by xenon gas, finds first ever lifelong study in mice
Following traumatic brain injury (TBI), xenon prevented early death, improved long-term cognition, and protected brain tissue in mice in a new study. TBI is the leading cause of death and disability in people under 45 in developed countries. The primary injury, caused by the initial force from a fall or car accident for example, is followed by a secondary injury which develops in the minutes, hours and days afterwards.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 20.05.2019
New method simplifies the search for protein receptor complexes, speeding drug development
For a drug to intervene in cells or entire organs that are not behaving normally, it must first bind to specific protein receptors in the cell membranes. Receptors can change their molecular structure in a multitude of ways during binding - and only the right structure will “unlock” the drug's therapeutic effect.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.05.2019
Cancer drug could be repurposed to provide treatment for brain aneurysms
Cancer drug could be repurposed to provide treatment for brain aneurysms
Cancer drug could be repurposed to provide treatment for brain aneurysms, new research suggests An important class of drug used to treat cancer patients could be used to treat brain aneurysms, according to new research published this week. Brain aneurysms are a bulge in a blood vessel caused by a weakness in the blood vessel wall.

Life Sciences - 17.05.2019
Bedbugs evolved more than 100 million years ago - and walked the earth with T.Rex
Bedbugs evolved more than 100 million years ago - and walked the earth with T.Rex
International research finds bedbugs evolved more than 100 million years ago - and walked the earth with T.Rex Bedbugs - some of the most unwanted human bedfellows - have been parasitic companions with other species asides from humans for more than 100 million years, walking the earth at the same time as dinosaurs.

Health - Life Sciences - 16.05.2019
Cooling baby treatment one of ‘Nation's Lifesavers'
Cooling baby treatment one of ‘Nation’s Lifesavers’
A University of Bristol researcher who discovered that cooling babies who have suffered a lack of oxygen at birth improves their survival without brain damage in later childhood, is named by Universities UK as one of the 'Nation's Lifesavers'. One in 1,000 babies born at full term in the UK suffer brain injury as a result of being severely deprived of oxygen.

Life Sciences - 10.05.2019
Dietary fats entering the brain may explain link between obesity and depression
Obesity and depression have long been linked, with previous clinical studies finding an association between these two conditions. However, until now, the mechanisms of how obesity affects depression and vice versa have not been fully understood. Now, in a new study led by the University of Glasgow in collaboration with the Gladstone Institutes, and published today in Translational Psychiatry , scientists have been able to demonstrate the links between the consumption of diets high in saturated fats that lead to obesity and the development of depression phenotypes.
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