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Law/Forensics



Results 21 - 40 of 74.


Politics - Law / Forensics - 14.12.2016
Thomas Muir - new evidence unearthed
New Court of Session papers, missing for more than 200 years, have been unearthed by the Faculty of Advocates and Professor Gerard Carruthers, University of Glasgow. The newly found papers shine light on Thomas Muir and how he courted controversy in his early years, which may have contributed to his treatment by the justice system in later life.

Law / Forensics - Health - 15.11.2016
Florida’s homicide rates rise after ’Stand Your Ground’ self-defence law
A change in self-defence laws in Florida which gave citizens the right to use lethal force to protect themselves in public has been linked with the state's homicide rates going up by nearly a quarter.  The study published in  JAMA Internal Medicine,  led by the University of Oxford with the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and the University of Pennsylvania, looked at homicide rates before and after the enactment of State Bill 436, known as the Stand Your Ground law, which was signed by Governor Jeb Bush in 2005.

Business / Economics - Law / Forensics - 07.11.2016
Online gambling regulations should be tightened to protect children and young people, research finds
Online gambling regulations should be tightened to protect children and young people, research finds
Children and adolescents are being targeted by online gambling websites due to flaws in advertising legislation, according to new research from Queen Mary University of London and City University London. The researchers point to recent statistics from an international research review which suggest that 77 to 83 per cent of adolescents are involved in some kind of gambling, and 10 to 15 per cent of adolescents are at risk of developing serious gambling problems.

Law / Forensics - Computer Science / Telecom - 24.10.2016
AI predicts outcomes of human rights trials
AI predicts outcomes of human rights trials
The judicial decisions of the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) have been predicted to 79% accuracy using an artificial intelligence (AI) method developed by researchers at UCL, the University of Sheffield and the University of Pennsylvania. The method is the first to predict the outcomes of a major international court by automatically analysing case text using a machine learning algorithm.

Life Sciences - Law / Forensics - 03.10.2016
First evidence of deep-sea animals ingesting microplastics
Following the news that the UK government is to ban plastic microbeads by the end of 2017, a team of scientists led by the University of Oxford has discovered the first evidence of microplastics being ingested by deep-sea animals. Researchers working on the Royal Research Ship (RRS) James Cook at two sites in the mid-Atlantic and south-west Indian Ocean found plastic microfibres inside creatures including hermit crabs, squat lobsters and sea cucumbers at depths of between 300m and 1800m.

Life Sciences - Law / Forensics - 29.09.2016
Vice-Chancellor’s Oration 2016
Following the news that the UK government is to ban plastic microbeads by the end of 2017, a team of scientists led by the University of Oxford has discovered the first evidence of microplastics being ingested by deep-sea animals. Researchers working on the Royal Research Ship (RRS) James Cook at two sites in the mid-Atlantic and south-west Indian Ocean found plastic microfibres inside creatures including hermit crabs, squat lobsters and sea cucumbers at depths of between 300m and 1800m.

Law / Forensics - Mechanical Engineering - 21.07.2016
Leonardo da Vinci’s irrelevant? scribbles mark the spot where he first recorded the laws of friction
A new detailed study of notes and sketches by Leonardo da Vinci has identified a page of scribbles in a tiny notebook as the place where Leonardo first recorded the laws of friction.

Law / Forensics - Social Sciences - 07.03.2016
Researchers investigate sexual orientation and gender identity asylum claims
A University of Liverpool law academic will produce the first ever comprehensive analysis of refugees seeking asylum across Europe on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity. Dr Nuno Ferreira , from Liverpool Law School , has been awarded a European Research Council (ERC) Starting Grant totalling ¤1million to carry out the project over four years.

Law / Forensics - Careers / Employment - 25.02.2016
Honeypot Britain? EU migrants’ benefits and the UK referendum
Ahead of Britain's EU referendum, research will explore the experiences of EU migrants working in the UK, and attitudes to employment and social security - for which there is little empirical evidence, despite intense political rhetoric. An initial study suggests workers from the EU are significantly under-represented in employment tribunals.

Social Sciences - Law / Forensics - 17.02.2016
Call for changes in EU policy to address migrant crisis
New study indicates deterrent measures such as anti-smuggling are ineffective and an alternative is needed - The research highlights the need for opening safe and legal routes for those migrating - Findings demonstrate that a deeper understanding of why people migrate is needed A series of proposed changes to EU policy on refugees and migrants has been released by researchers at the University of Warwick.

Law / Forensics - Social Sciences - 03.02.2016
Failing carers
Survey finds local authorities falling short on respite care There are serious failings in the accessibility and accuracy of short break statements among local authorities in England, according to new research by the University. Short breaks or respite care is an important support service that allows families and disabled children to have time apart.

History / Archeology - Law / Forensics - 29.01.2016
Georgian jailbirds and celebrity highwaymen shaped modern Britain, say historians
Eighteenth-century thieves, paupers, prostitutes and highwaymen helped shape the evolution of modern justice and welfare systems, according to new evidence uncovered by historians. London Lives, a landmark project led by Professor Bob Shoemaker from the University of Sheffield and Professor Tim Hitchcock from the University of Sussex, has uncovered a mass of extraordinary new evidence which reveals how the lives of thousands of 18th-century poor and criminal Londoners helped shape modern Britain.

Health - Law / Forensics - 20.01.2016
Laws of nature predict cancer evolution
Cancers evolve over time in patterns governed by the same mathematical laws that drive natural processes such as the flow of rivers or the brightness of stars, reports a study led by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) and The Institute of Cancer Research. The research raises the possibility that doctors could take clinical decisions on how an individual patient's cancer will change, and what treatments should be used, by applying mathematical formulas to tumour biopsies.

Law / Forensics - 14.12.2015
Family court ‘recycles’ one in three young mums
At least 1 in 4 women will return to the family court, having previously lost a child through court order, and the chances of having a child removed increase to at least 1 in 3 for the youngest women who were teenagers at the birth of their first child. A team of researchers, funded by the Nuffield Foundation and led by Professor Karen Broadhurst from Lancaster University, have updated initial findings, presented last year, confirming that a ‘hidden population' of mothers are caught up in a cycle of family court proceedings, with one child after another being removed from women's care.

Law / Forensics - 02.11.2015
Fingerprinting ivory
Scientists from King's College London and University College London have collaborated with imaging and fingerprint experts from the Metropolitan Police to validate the use of new techniques for retrieving fingerprints from ivory for the first time. The findings, published in the journal Science and Justice , could lead to wider use of fingerprinting methods in the field to more easily identify poachers in regions with high levels of ivory-related crime.

Business / Economics - Law / Forensics - 13.10.2015
Crime study into e-payment fraud reported at joint police and industry conference
Andrew Charlesworth, Reader in IT & Law at the University of Bristol Law School, reported findings from a two-year EU-funded project he undertook on the increasing threat cybercrime poses to the UK's payment industry. The results were disseminated to police officers from national and international agencies, and members of the payments industry, at a conference in Londo.

Health - Law / Forensics - 15.05.2015
New test detects drug use from a single fingerprint
Research published today in the journal Analyst has demonstrated a new, non-invasive test that can detect cocaine use through a simple fingerprint. For the first time, this new fingerprint method can determine whether cocaine has been ingested, rather than just touched.

Administration - Law / Forensics - 02.05.2015
Warwick experts help West Midlands Police convict killers
Unique collaboration sees cutting edge research used to prove murder cases Futuristic 3D scanning technology at WMG , University of Warwick is helping West Midlands Police to convict killers thanks to a pioneering new partnership which is providing juries with microscopic evidence previously beyond the reach of forensic testing.

Law / Forensics - Administration - 23.02.2015
Tobacco Industry’s spurious claims on plain packaging must be challenged
In this letter, published in the Law Society Gazette, QMUL's Jonathan Griffiths challenges "undue pessimism" about the UK's imminent legislation on plain packaging. Richard Taylor is unduly pessimistic about the UK's imminent legislation on standardised packaging for tobacco products. He suggests that the government will be taking a 'massive gamble', because the tobacco industry will challenge the uncompensated regulation of their 'brands' as a violation of the property right protected under the European Union's Charter of Fundamental Rights (article 17).

Law / Forensics - Health - 31.12.2014
New Year Honours 2015
Some breathalysers on sale to the UK public vary considerably in their ability to detect potentially unsafe levels of breath alcohol for driving, Oxford University researchers have found. The findings call into question the regulatory process for approving these sorts of devices for personal use, say the researchers, particularly as false reassurance about a person's safety to drive could have potentially catastrophic consequences.