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Law / Forensics - 01.10.2018
Couples in South Asia struggle to gain economic independence from in-laws
Intergenerational power relations may be just as important as male-female power relations for women's economic empowerment, according to new UCL research. The study, published in  World Development , was conducted in rural Nepal where mothers-in-law and daughters-in-law often have fraught relationships, as their survival and well-being depend on gaining favour with male family members.

Politics - Law / Forensics - 07.08.2018
Visa restrictions can lead to increase in illegal migration
While Government-imposed restrictions on immigration can reduce overall migration, they can also be ineffective or even counterproductive, pushing more would-be migrants into unauthorised channels, finds new UCL-led research in collaboration with Royal Holloway and University of Birmingham. The study, published today in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , investigated how individuals are likely to move from one country to another based on varying levels of restriction.

Law / Forensics - Social Sciences - 19.06.2018
Changing the law to protect victims of upskirting
Changing the law to protect victims of upskirting
Professor Clare McGlynn of Durham Law School tells how her research has helped to shape a law on upskirting and why more comprehensive legislation is needed to protect victims from all image-based sexual abuse. Moves to legislate against upskirting - the act of secretly taking a photograph under a victim's skirt - hit the headlines when a planned law to criminalise the act stalled in Parliament.

Business / Economics - Law / Forensics - 04.06.2018
Eye-tracking software makes insurance policies easier to understand
Researchers at the University of Nottingham and insurance law firm Browne Jacobson LLP are using eye-tracking software to help insurers write policies that are much easier to read and understand. If you've ever found an insurance document difficult to read, then you are not alone. A new study has found that one of the reasons for this is the number of ‘uncommon words' which are used in most policies.

Life Sciences - Law / Forensics - 25.05.2018
Animal welfare research leads to European law reform
Ground-breaking research aimed at improving bird welfare during poultry production has directly led to a change in EU law. The new regulation, which was brought into force on Friday 18 May, makes it legal in the European Union to use Low Atmospheric Pressure Stunning (LAPS) - proven to be a humane method for the pre-slaughter stunning of broiler chickens.

Business / Economics - Law / Forensics - 25.04.2018
Clearing up online confusion for consumers - top tips from the experts
PA 75/18 Consumers often fail to see important information about online services - which can lead to unexpected costs, according to new research. When you are buying a service online, what do you look at on a website? Connection Services (for example) offer connection to a small number of organisation's customer service phone lines -for a cost.

Law / Forensics - 11.04.2018
Using research to end modern slavery
A new report published today looks in detail at what research is being undertaken about modern slavery in the UK and what research we still need. Modern slavery is a brutal abuse, denying people their dignity, safety and freedom. It affects millions worldwide and thousands here in the UK. In order to see more victims rescued and more perpetrators behind bars, experts need to know about the scales, causes and consequences of modern slavery and about the strategies to combat it.

Law / Forensics - 28.03.2018
Good neighbours really do matter according to a new study
PA 51/18 Poorer countries with ‘bad' neighbours are more likely to perform less well when it comes to human rights according to new research from the University of Nottingham. In the paper, ‘ Good neighbours matter: economic geography and the diffusion of human rights' published in the journal Spatial Economic Analysis , Professor Todd Landman from the University of Nottingham and his co-authors, use data from a wide range of countries to investigate the geopolitical and economic aspects of human rights performance.

Law / Forensics - Social Sciences - 09.03.2018
More vulnerable male adults are victims of forced marriage than previously thought
38/18 A higher number of men with learning disabilities are victims of forced marriage than previously thought, suggesting that better education and training is needed to recognise those at risk. This was just one of the findings of the new study - ‘ My Marriage, My Choice' which shows that there appears to have been a reversal in trends related to gender, with more cases of men with learning disabilities now being reported than those of women.

History / Archeology - Law / Forensics - 14.12.2017
New image brings people face to face with Seventeenth Century Scottish soldier
New image brings people face to face with Seventeenth Century Scottish soldier
New image brings people face to face with Seventeenth Century Scottish soldier (14 December 2017) The face of one of the Seventeenth Century Scottish soldiers who was imprisoned and died in Durham following the Battle of Dunbar in 1650 has been revealed through a remarkable new digital reconstruction.

Law / Forensics - Literature / Linguistics - 19.10.2017
100 years on, poet’s "bloodless death" mystery solved
The famed “bloodless death” of a landmark British poet in the Great War has been investigated by experts from the Humanities and Sciences a century after his death, in a new project undertaken at Cardiff University. Biographical and critical works about Edward Thomas (1878 - 1917) often refer to his “bloodless death”, a story that emerged following his death aged just 39 at the Battle of Arras on Easter Monday in 1917.

Law / Forensics - 10.10.2017
Care after miscarriage needs 'standardised approach', report reveals
Care after miscarriage needs ’standardised approach’, report reveals
The standard of care for mothers experiencing the end of a pregnancy varies widely, with more to be done to replicate good practice found in some NHS Trusts and hospitals, according to a new study led by researchers at the Universities of Bristol and Birmingham. The findings are the result of the first stage of Death Before Birth , a two-year study looking at the experience of women who have gone through the potentially traumatic experience of pregnancy loss either through miscarriage or termination for fetal anomaly, or experience of stillbirth.

Law / Forensics - 30.08.2017
Researchers publish 'English Votes for English Laws' monitor
Researchers publish ’English Votes for English Laws’ monitor
Political scientists from Queen Mary University of London and the University of Cambridge have published a new resource for monitoring 'English Votes for English Laws' (EVEL) in parliament. EVEL was implemented in 2015 to address an anomaly - known as the 'West Lothian Question' - by which Scottish MPs can vote on issues affecting only England - or England and Wales - while English MPs have no such power over Scotland.

Law / Forensics - 17.07.2017
Hundred-year-old law on fluid flow overturned by Imperial research
Hundred-year-old law on fluid flow overturned by Imperial research
Engineers from Imperial College London have dispelled a 100-year-old scientific law used to describe how fluid flows through rocks. The three 3D models below show fluid flowing through rocks at different microscopic scales. The discovery by researchers from Imperial could lead to a range of improvements including advances in Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS).

Careers / Employment - Law / Forensics - 13.07.2017
Anchoring Labour Rights More Effectively In EU Trade Agreements
Anchoring Labour Rights More Effectively In EU Trade Agreements
Professor Adrian Smith and Dr Liam Campling write for Social Europe about strengthening labour rights in UK and EU trade agreements.  Free trade agreements (FTAs) are growing in number and the inclusion in them of labour provisions seeking to improve working conditions are also increasing. A recent study by the ILO found that over 80 per cent of preferential trade agreements that have come into force since 2013 have included such provisions.

Social Sciences - Law / Forensics - 06.06.2017
Culture affects how people deceive others say researchers
Culture affects how people deceive others say researchers
Psychologists have discovered that people's language changes when they lie depending on their cultural background. Psychologists have discovered that people's language changes when they lie depending on their cultural background. Professor Paul Taylor from Lancaster University said: “Science has long known that people's use of language changes when they lie.

Health - Law / Forensics - 04.04.2017
Delaying marriage in developing countries benefits children
Delaying marriage in developing countries benefits children
Delaying marriage in developing countries benefits children Delaying the marriage age of young women in parts of the developing world has significant positive effects for their children, a new study shows. The research, conducted by academics at the University of Sussex, in collaboration with researchers at the University of Washington at Seattle and the World Bank, looked at data from tens of thousands of households across India.

Law / Forensics - 23.03.2017
Family court transparency
New research from Cardiff University's School of Law and Politics suggests that guidance given to judges to routinely publish their judgments is not being consistently followed, leaving the public with a patchy understanding of the family justice system in England and Wales. Issued in 2014, the guidance was intended to address perceptions, especially in the media, of ‘secrecy' and ‘justice behind closed doors' when important decisions are made about children in family courts.

Law / Forensics - 06.01.2017
Brixton Road becomes first place in London to breach Nitrogen dioxide limits
Data from King's College London's Environmental Research Group has shown Brixton Road has become the first place in London to breach objectives for nitrogen dioxide for 2017. UK objectives and EU limits stipulate a maximum nitrogen dioxide concentration that must not to be exceeded for more than 18 hours over the whole year.

Politics - Law / Forensics - 14.12.2016
Thomas Muir - new evidence unearthed
New Court of Session papers, missing for more than 200 years, have been unearthed by the Faculty of Advocates and Professor Gerard Carruthers, University of Glasgow. The newly found papers shine light on Thomas Muir and how he courted controversy in his early years, which may have contributed to his treatment by the justice system in later life.
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