« BACK

Environment



Results 81 - 100 of 909.


Environment - 11.10.2018
Feeding 10 billion people by 2050 within planetary limits may be achievable
A global shift towards healthy and more plant-based diets, halving food loss and waste, and improving farming practices and technologies are required to feed 10 billion people sustainably by 2050, a new study finds. Adopting these options reduces the risk of crossing global environmental limits related to climate change, the use of agricultural land, the extraction of freshwater resources, and the pollution of ecosystems through overapplication of fertilizers, according to the researchers.

Environment - 08.10.2018
Serious climate change mitigation is likely to reshape everyday life in unexpected ways
The public is supportive of emissions reduction strategies that are likely to bring significant changes to the way we own and use everyday items such as clothing, cars and furniture, finds a new study led by Cardiff University.

Environment - 08.10.2018
’Genes are not destiny’ when it comes to weight
A healthy home environment could help offset children's genetic susceptibilities to obesity, according to new research led by UCL. The study, published this week in JAMA Pediatrics , found that the impact of genetic factors on weight is roughly halved if a child is bought up in a less 'obesogenic' home environment where healthy eating and exercise is more prevalent.

Environment - 02.10.2018
Cigarettes have a significant impact on the environment, not just health
Cigarettes have a significant impact on the environment, not just health
A new report shows that the six trillion cigarettes produced yearly impact the environment through climate change, water and land use, and toxicity. The devastating impact of the tobacco industry on human health is well known. However, a new report systematically outlines for the first time the substantial impact of the tobacco industry on the environment.

Environment - 01.10.2018
Humans delayed the onset of the Sahara desert by 500 years
Humans did not accelerate the decline of the 'Green Sahara' and may have managed to hold back the onset of the Sahara desert by around 500 years, according to new research led by UCL.

Environment - 27.09.2018
Plastics found in fifty percent of freshwater insects
Research led by Cardiff University's School of Biosciences has revealed that microplastics are widespread in insects from South Wales rivers. Microplastic fragments - pieces of plastic debris under five millimetres - were found to have been ingested by one in every two insects, and at all the sites sampled.

Environment - Life Sciences - 21.09.2018
Land-based bird populations are at risk of local extinction
Land-based bird populations are at risk of local extinction
Land-based bird populations are becoming confined to nature reserves in some parts of the world - raising the risk of global extinction - due to the loss of suitable habitat, according to a report led by UCL. Researchers analysed biodiversity in the area known as Sundaland, which covers the peninsula of Thailand, Borneo, Malaysia, Sumatra, Java and Bali, one of the world's most biologically degraded regions.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 19.09.2018
Moderate warming, if sustained, could melt the ’sleeping giant’ of Antarctica
Imperial experts have predicted that sustained Antarctic warming of just 2C could melt the largest ice sheet on earth. New research on Antarctic sediment layers has shown that the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS), also known as Antarctica's ‘sleeping giant', retreated during extended warm periods in the past - when temperatures were like those predicted for this century.

Environment - 19.09.2018
Why do we love bees but hate wasps?
A lack of understanding of the important role of wasps in the ecosystem and economy is a fundamental reason why they are universally despised whereas bees are much loved, according to UCL-led research. Both bees and wasps are two of humanity's most ecologically and economically important organisms. They both pollinate our flowers and crops, but wasps also regulate populations of crop pests and insects that carry human diseases.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 18.09.2018
’High-yield’ farming costs the environment less than previously thought - and could help spare habitats
New findings suggest that more intensive agriculture might be the "least bad" option for feeding the world while saving its species - provided use of such "land-efficient" systems prevents further conversion of wilderness to farmland. Agriculture that appears to be more eco-friendly but uses more land may actually have greater environmental costs per unit of food than "high-yield" farming that uses less land, a new study has found.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 17.09.2018
'High-yield' farming costs the environment less than previously thought - and could help spare habitats
New research involving dairy experts at the University of Nottingham suggests that more intensive agriculture might be the ‘least bad' option for feeding the world, while saving its species - provided use of such “land-efficient” systems prevents further conversion of wilderness to farmland.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 14.09.2018
’High-yield’ farming costs the environment less than previously thought - and could help spare habitats
New findings suggest that more intensive agriculture might be the "least bad" option for feeding the world while saving its species - provided use of such "land-efficient" systems prevents further conversion of wilderness to farmland. Our results suggest that high-yield farming could be harnessed to meet the growing demand for food without destroying more of the natural world Andrew Balmford Agriculture that appears to be more eco-friendly but uses more land may actually have greater environmental costs per unit of food than "high-yield" farming that uses less land, a new study has found.

Environment - 11.09.2018
Marine 'biodiversity crisis' tackled with new database of conservation plans
Marine ’biodiversity crisis’ tackled with new database of conservation plans
The database brings together plans from around the world, enabling researchers to improve future plans and save species from extinction. The number of protected areas for conservation is rising rapidly, and this trend is set to continue as international policy targets are set in the face of a ‘biodiversity crisis': the rapid loss of species and degradation of ecosystems.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 04.09.2018
Episodic and intense rain caused by ancient global warming
Episodic and intense rain caused by ancient global warming
A new study by scientists at the University of Bristol has shown that ancient global warming was associated with intense rainfall events that had a profound impact on the land and coastal seas. The Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), which occurred about 56 Million years ago, is of great interest to climate scientists because it represents a relatively rapid global warming event, with some similarities to the human-induced warming of today.

Chemistry - Environment - 03.09.2018
Scientists pioneer a new way to turn sunlight into fuel
Scientists pioneer a new way to turn sunlight into fuel
The quest to find new ways to harness solar power has taken a step forward after researchers successfully split water into hydrogen and oxygen by altering the photosynthetic machinery in plants. This could be a great platform for developing solar technologies. Katarzyna Sok? Photosynthesis is the process plants use to convert sunlight into energy.

Environment - 31.08.2018
Prehistoric changes in vegetation could predict future of Earth's ecosystems
Prehistoric changes in vegetation could predict future of Earth’s ecosystems
Dramatic changes in the Earth's vegetation at the end of the last ice age could be a sign of future climate driven changes if greenhouse gas emissions are not cut. New research by an international team of scientists, including researchers at Durham University's Department of Biosciences , found that the Earth's vegetation underwent major changes as the last ice age came to an end 14,000 years ago and the planet warmed.

Health - Environment - 29.08.2018
Experts warn of cardiovascular risk from heavy metal pollution
Experts warn of cardiovascular risk from heavy metal pollution
Even low doses of toxic chemicals in the environment pose a significant risk to cardiovascular health, according to a report in today's edition of The BMJ , led by researchers at the University of Cambridge. The researchers have also challenged the omission of environmental risk factors such as toxic metal contaminants in water and foods from the recent World Health Organization report on non-communicable diseases (NCDs).

Environment - 28.08.2018
Governments urged to act by 2035 to keep global warming below 2C
If governments don't act decisively by 2035 to fight climate change, humanity could cross a point of no return after which limiting global warming below 2C in 2100 will be unlikely, according to a new study by scientists in the UK and the Netherlands. The research also shows the deadline to limit warming to 1.5C has already passed, unless radical climate action is taken.

Health - Environment - 23.08.2018
Cool indoor temperatures linked to high blood pressure
Cool indoor temperatures linked to high blood pressure
Turning up the thermostat may help manage hypertension, finds a new UCL study into the link between indoor temperatures and high blood pressure. Comparing blood pressure readings of people in their own homes with temperature readings, the researchers found that lower indoor temperatures were associated with higher blood pressure, according to the new study in the Journal of Hypertension .

Environment - Life Sciences - 21.08.2018
Less drain on freshwater supplies with seawater fuel discovery
Less drain on freshwater supplies with seawater fuel discovery
Researchers have found that seawater can replace freshwater to produce the sustainable fuel Bioethanol, reducing the need to drain precious resources. The study - ‘ The establishment of a marine focused biorefinery for bioethanol production using seawater and a novel marine yeast strain ' - has been published in Scientific Reports and was carried out by researchers at the University of Nottingham.