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Environment - Earth Sciences - 23.07.2018
Ocean acidification to hit levels not seen in 14 million years
The world's oceans are likely to become more acidic than at any time in the past 14 million years, scientists have found. New research led by Cardiff University has shown that under a ‘business-as-usual' scenario of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, ocean acidification is likely to hit unprecedented levels.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 20.07.2018
How plants use carbon affects their response to climate change
How plants use carbon affects their response to climate change
Under warmer conditions, plants can take up more carbon dioxide by using carbon more efficiently for growth, shows a new study. Plants take in - or ‘fix' - carbon dioxide from the atmosphere during photosynthesis. Some of the carbon is used for plant growth, and some of it is used in respiration, where the plant breaks down sugars to get energy.

Life Sciences - Environment - 19.07.2018
New insights into plants' conquest of land
New insights into plants’ conquest of land
The Earth is filled with diverse and remarkable plant forms from the tallest redwoods that pierce forest canopies, to the smallest mosses that blanket the ground underfoot. However, these striking forms came from much simpler origins. The ancestors of land plants were string-like (2D), aquatic green algae that looked very different from the three-dimensional (3D), upright stems and leaves of plants we are familiar with today.

Environment - Administration - 19.07.2018
Workers’ rights should be at the heart of global sustainable development, says new report
Workers' rights should be at the heart of global sustainable development, says new report (17 July 2018) Workers' rights should be placed at the heart of global efforts to improve sustainable development, according to a new international study. The Unacceptable Forms of Work: Global Dialogue/Location Innovation report , led by Durham University, UK, came as the world's politicians met to review progress towards the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) .

Environment - 16.07.2018
Using ’shade balls’ in reservoirs may use up more water than they save
Preventing reservoir evaporation during droughts with floating balls may not help conserve water overall, due to the water needed to make the balls. During droughts, communities may rely on water stored in reservoirs. However, significant amounts of water can evaporate from the surface of the reservoir.

Environment - Life Sciences - 16.07.2018
Missing bones and our understanding of ancient biodiversity
Missing bones and our understanding of ancient biodiversity
Palaeontologists face an important question, ‘does the quality of fossil skeletons impact our understanding of biodiversity patterns in the past'. Palaeontologists rely on the fossil record to uncover the hidden pasts of long extinct animal groups. When fossil specimens are discovered, new species are often named, and over time, we begin to paint a picture of past biodiversity.

Environment - Life Sciences - 12.07.2018
Virtual reality used to treat fear of heights
Virtual reality used to treat fear of heights
It is widely accepted that the human race originated from Africa - likely from a single ancestral population.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 12.07.2018
Great Britain's coastal wetlands threatened by rising sea levels
Great Britain’s coastal wetlands threatened by rising sea levels
Marshlands in the south east of England could start to disappear from the year 2040 due to rapid sea level rise, according to new research involving Durham University scientists. Using data from more than 800 sediment cores which record how salt marshes responded to variable rates of sea-level rise over the past 10,000 years, the researchers estimate that marshes in the south east of England could start to disappear from the year 2040, and across all of Great Britain by 2100.

Life Sciences - Environment - 11.07.2018
Our fractured African roots
Our African ancestors were diverse in form and culture, and scattered across the entire continent, finds a team led by UCL, the University of Oxford and the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History. These findings challenge the idea that humans, or Homo sapiens , stemmed from a single, large ancestral population in one region of Africa which randomly exchanged genes and technologies like stone tools.

Environment - Health - 09.07.2018
Long term use of some pesticides is killing off dung beetle populations
Long term use of some pesticides is killing off dung beetle populations
New research led by scientists at the University of Bristol has uncovered that long-term use of some pesticides to treat cattle for parasites is having a significantly detrimental effect on the dung beetle population. Researchers studied 24 cattle farms across south west England and found that farms that used certain pesticides had fewer species of dung beetle.

Agronomy / Food Science - Environment - 05.07.2018
Promoting cycling in cities can tackle obesity
Daily travel by bike leads to the lowest BMI, according to a study of seven European cities, suggesting cities should promote active commutes. More bike-friendly cities would also help reduce pollution and tackle air pollution, say the study's authors. The analysis of data from seven European cities - part of the European Commission funded Physical Activity through Sustainable Transport Approaches (PASTA) project - suggests that daily cyclists weigh less than their non-active counterparts.

Business / Economics - Environment - 04.07.2018
Volte-face: Research advises selling electric vehicles to untapped market of women
Volte-face: Research advises selling electric vehicles to untapped market of women More focused marketing of electric cars to women could be more effective in creating the required revolution away from more polluting vehicles than universal government intervention, a new study has said. Highly educated women are an untapped but potentially lucrative market for electric vehicle sales because they have greater environmental and fuel efficiency awareness than men, says a new study by researchers at the University of Sussex and Aarhus University in Denmark.

Environment - Life Sciences - 02.07.2018
Expense of creating giant panda reserves dwarfed by the income they generate
Expense of creating giant panda reserves dwarfed by the income they generate
Protecting the giant panda and its habitat yields up to 27 times the cost of its conservation, new research shows. Professor Mike Bruford of Cardiff University was part of a team of researchers who worked to assess the financial benefits to humans brought about by the giant panda nature reserves in China.

Environment - Life Sciences - 28.06.2018
Reducing the need for 24-hour blood pressure monitors in general practice
Using data from nearly 74,000 images, volunteer armchair scientists have helped Oxford University researchers to capture and better understand, the breeding habits of penguin breeding colonies across the Antarctic Peninsula, South Shetland Islands and South Georgia. The study features in Scientific Data , and was undertaken as part of Oxford's 'Penguin Watch' programme, which runs as part of the Zooniverse - the world's largest and most popular volunteer science platform.

Environment - Life Sciences - 28.06.2018
Rethinking the orangutan
The evolution of the orangutan has been more heavily influenced by humans than was previously thought, new research reveals. Professor Mike Bruford, of Cardiff University, was part of the team of scientists shedding light on the development of the critically endangered species. Their findings offer new possibilities for orangutan conservation.

Agronomy / Food Science - Environment - 27.06.2018
City bees outbreed their country cousins
Bumblebees placed in urban areas produce more offspring than colonies in agricultural areas, concludes a surprising new study. The research, led by academics from Royal Holloway University of London and including an Imperial College London researcher, is published today in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B .

Environment - 26.06.2018
UK urban forest can store as much carbon as tropical rainforests
UK urban forest can store as much carbon as tropical rainforests
Pockets of urban forest can contain as much carbon as tropical rainforests, according to new research led by UCL.  Protecting and planting urban forests is central to building liveable and sustainable cities in a future where global populations are set to become increasingly urbanised. This research sheds new light on the value of urban trees for their potential to store carbon and mitigate climate change.

Environment - Health - 26.06.2018
Adhering to Paris Agreement climate goal could significantly decrease heat-related summer deaths
Adhering to Paris Agreement climate goal could significantly decrease heat-related summer deaths
As much of the UK and Europe swelters under heatwave conditions, new research led by scientists from the University of Bristol has produced compelling evidence that loss of life through increased heat stress during heatwaves can be limited if we stabilise climate at the lower of the Paris Agreement climate goals.

Environment - Innovation / Technology - 25.06.2018
Greener energy generation alone will not help us reach climate goals
Transport, buildings and industry need to start using lower carbon sources of energy now if we are to avoid the worst impacts of climate change. Transporting goods, heating buildings and manufacturing products all rely on fossil fuels. Without serious change now in these sectors, we will be ‘locked in' to increased carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions for decades, say the authors of a new report.

Health - Environment - 25.06.2018
Men's testosterone levels largely determined by childhood environment
Men’s testosterone levels largely determined by childhood environment
Men's testosterone levels are largely determined by their environment during childhood, according to new research. The Durham University-led study suggests that men who grow up in more challenging conditions where there are lots of infectious diseases, for example, are likely to have lower testosterone levels in later life than those who spend their childhood in healthier environments.
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