« BACK

Environment



Results 101 - 120 of 909.


Life Sciences - Environment - 20.08.2018
To float or not to float? Mystery solved as to why algae balls float and sink
To float or not to float? Mystery solved as to why algae balls float and sink
20 August 2018 Scientists from the University of Bristol have uncovered the age-old mystery of why marimo algae balls sink at night and float during the day. The balls are a rare form of algae found naturally in lakes in the northern hemisphere, particularly Japan and Iceland. In Japan they have such important cultural significance, they are a protected species.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 16.08.2018
Coral bleaching on Great Barrier Reef is on the rise
Coral bleaching on Great Barrier Reef is on the rise
Coral bleaching across Australia's Great Barrier Reef has been occurring since the late 18 th century, new research shows. Coral bleaching Using cores taken from long-lived corals, scientists show that bleaching events have steadily affected more and more corals, and are happening more frequently than in the past, adding to existing concerns about the future of coral reefs.

Life Sciences - Environment - 14.08.2018
Help survey wasps over the bank holiday weekend
Help survey wasps over the bank holiday weekend
Wasps might not be the nation's favourite insects but are some of the most important so UCL and University of Gloucestershire scientists are again asking for the public's help to find out more about these misunderstood creatures. "Wasps are predators, pest controllers and pollinators - they are absolutely vital for a healthy ecosystem and they deserve our respect.

Chemistry - Environment - 13.08.2018
Evidence of how Neolithic people adapted to climate change
Evidence of how Neolithic people adapted to climate change
13 August 2018 Research led by the University of Bristol has uncovered evidence that early farmers were adapting to climate change 8,200 years ago. The study, published today in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS) , centred on the Neolithic and Chalcolithic city settlement of Çatalhöyük in southern Anatolia, Turkey which existed from approximately 7500 BC to 5700 BC.

Mathematics - Environment - 09.08.2018
Half of London car crashes take place in 5% of the city's junctions
Half of London car crashes take place in 5% of the city’s junctions
The location of road accidents is not random and they tend to be highly concentrated in urban areas, according to a new UCL study. The study, published in the open-access journal Plos One , found that nearly 50% of the serious and fatal accidents in London take place in 5% of road junctions.   PhD candidate Rafael Prieto Curiel, lead researcher (UCL Mathematics), said: "Despite being a rare event, road accidents are among the top ten causes of death worldwide.

Health - Environment - 06.08.2018
Foot-and-mouth disease vaccination could reduce poverty in eastern Africa
Vaccinating livestock against foot-and-mouth disease could help to reduce poverty in eastern Africa, according to new research. The study found that a vaccination programme targeting the circulating strains of foot-and-mouth disease in livestock, could help to alleviate poverty in eastern Africa. The research, led by the University's Boyd Orr Centre for Population and Ecosystem Health, looked at the causes and effects of foot-and-mouth disease in Tanzania, surveying farming households in the area and examining how the disease passed to livestock.

Physics - Environment - 02.08.2018
Scientists measure severity of drought during the Maya collapse
Scientists measure severity of drought during the Maya collapse
The severity of drought conditions during the demise of the Maya civilisation about one thousand years ago has been quantified, representing another piece of evidence that could be used to solve the longstanding mystery of what caused the downfall of one of the ancient world's great civilisations.  The role of climate change in the collapse of Classic Maya civilisation is somewhat controversial, partly because previous records are limited to qualitative reconstructions.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 30.07.2018
Ever-increasing CO2 levels could take us back to the tropical climate of Paleogene period
Ever-increasing CO2 levels could take us back to the tropical climate of Paleogene period
A new study led by scientists at the University of Bristol has warned that unless we mitigate current levels of carbon dioxide emissions, Western Europe and New Zealand could revert to the hot tropical climate of the early Paleogene period - 56-48 million years ago. As seen from the ongoing heat wave, the knock-on effects of such extreme warmth include arid land and fires as well as impacts on health and infrastructure.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 30.07.2018
Carbon 'leak' may have warmed the planet for 11,000 years, encouraging human civilisation
Carbon ’leak’ may have warmed the planet for 11,000 years, encouraging human civilisation
The oceans are the planet's most important depository for atmospheric carbon dioxide on time scales of decades to millennia. But the process of locking away greenhouse gas is weakened by activity of the Southern Ocean, so an increase in its activity could explain the mysterious warmth of the past 11,000 years, an international team of researchers reports.

Environment - 27.07.2018
Heatwave triggered by climate change
Heatwave triggered by climate change
The unprecedented temperatures seen over Summer 2018 are a sign of things to come - and a direct result of climate change, according to new Oxford University research. In the newly published report, researchers from the Environmental Change Institute (ECI) at the School of Geography and Environment, Oxford University , who worked in collaboration with the World Weather Attribution network (WWA) , reveal that climate change more than doubled the likelihood of the European heatwave, which could come to be known as regular summer temperatures.

Environment - 27.07.2018
Heatwave made ’twice as likely by climate change’
The unprecedented temperatures seen over Summer 2018 are a sign of things to come  - and a direct result of climate change, according to new Oxford University research. In the newly published report, researchers from the  Environmental Change Institute (ECI) at the School of Geography and Environment, Oxford University , who worked in collaboration with the World Weather Attribution network (WWA) , reveal that climate change more than doubled the likelihood of the European heatwave, which could come to be known as regular summer temperatures.

Environment - Innovation / Technology - 26.07.2018
Wind and solar power could provide more than third of Europe's energy by 2030
Wind and solar power could provide more than third of Europe’s energy by 2030
By trading energy between countries with different weather patterns, Europe could make the most of wind and solar power. This conclusion is from a study modelling the future of weather and energy in Europe, which could help plan future continent-wide energy systems and policies that share renewable resources across countries.

Environment - Innovation / Technology - 26.07.2018
Wind and solar power could provide more than a third of Europe’s energy by 2030
By trading energy between countries with different weather patterns, Europe could make the most of wind and solar power. This conclusion is from a study modelling the future of weather and energy in Europe, which could help plan future continent-wide energy systems and policies that share renewable resources across countries.

Environment - Life Sciences - 26.07.2018
Removing malaria-carrying mosquitoes unlikely to affect ecosystems, says report
By combining studies on one species of malaria-carrying mosquito, researchers found that no other animals rely solely on them for food. The study, by Imperial College London researchers, suggests the mosquito can be reduced or even eliminated in local areas without impacting the ecosystem. Locally eliminating this one species of mosquito could drastically cut cases of malaria, although the team note that more research is needed in the field to test that the ecosystem is not significantly perturbed.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 25.07.2018
The tropics at tipping point
Global biodiversity is at tipping point and on the verge of collapse, according to a major research collaboration. The team caution that urgent, concerted action is needed to reverse species loss in the tropics and prevent an environmental catastrophe.

Environment - 24.07.2018
Bin the bug spray now: New study shows EU pesticide ban is failing to protect suburban bee populations
Bin the bug spray now: New study shows EU pesticide ban is failing to protect suburban bee populations
Bin the bug spray now: New study shows EU pesticide ban is failing to protect suburban bee populations Bees living in suburban habitats are still being exposed to significant levels of pesticides despite the EU ban on the use of neonicotinoid pesticides on flowering crops, new research from University of Sussex scientists shows.

Environment - Life Sciences - 24.07.2018
China’s "livestock revolution” demands "new transition”
Demand for animal protein and increasing wealth fuelled a tripling in the domestic production of livestock in China between 1980 and 2010, and the rise, despite some improvements in efficiencies at the farm level, had significant impacts on environmental sustainability, nationally and globally. With this rise set to continue, an international team of researchers, including the University of Bristol Veterinary School , has now devised a blueprint to increase production efficiency and environmental performance through a "new transition" backed by an array of stakeholders.

Environment - Life Sciences - 23.07.2018
Population declines of mammals and birds linked to rapid warming of climate
The rate at which our planet is warming has been found to be a critical factor in explaining the decline of bird and mammal species, reveals new research by UCL and ZSL (Zoological Society of London).

Business / Economics - Environment - 23.07.2018
Climate change will only affect the economic growth of the poorest nations
Climate change will only affect the economic growth of the poorest nations
Climate change will only affect the economic growth of the poorest nations Climate change looks set to slow productivity only in the world's poorest nations, according to new research from University of Sussex and La Sapienza economists. The research, published in Environmental and Resource Economics , warns that the world's 100 poorest countries will be 5% worse off by the end of the century than they would have been without climate change - wiping trillions of dollars from the global economy every year.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 23.07.2018
Sculpting to interpret climate change
Sculpting to interpret climate change
An intriguing new exhibition using rocks to represent different aspects and interpretations of climate change will be on display at the University of Bristol's School of Earth Sciences, Wills Memorial Building, from Wednesday 25 July. For the past six months, artist and sculptor, Alice Cunningham has been working as an artist-in-residence as part of the School's EarthArt programme which encourages local artists to work with members academics on an art-science collaborative project.