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Palaeontology - Earth Sciences - 25.07.2018
New dinosaur found in the wrong place, at the wrong time
A new dinosaur called Lingwulong shenqi or 'amazing dragon from Lingwu' has been discovered by an Anglo-Chinese team involving UCL. The announcement, published today , reports the surprising discovery of the new dinosaur which roamed the Ningxia Autonomous Region, northwest China, approximately 174 million years ago.

Earth Sciences - Palaeontology - 25.07.2018
Creating 'synthetic' fossils in the lab sheds light on fossilisation processes
Creating ’synthetic’ fossils in the lab sheds light on fossilisation processes
A newly published experimental protocol, involving University of Bristol scientists, could change the way fossilisation is studied. In addition to directly studying fossils themselves, experimental treatments of fresh organismal remains can be utilised to study fossilisation. One commonly employed experimental approach is known as ‘artificial maturation', where high heat and pressure accelerate the chemical degradation reactions that normally occur over millions of years when a fossil is buried deep underground and exposed to geothermal heat and pressure from overlying sediment.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 23.07.2018
Sculpting to interpret climate change
Sculpting to interpret climate change
An intriguing new exhibition using rocks to represent different aspects and interpretations of climate change will be on display at the University of Bristol's School of Earth Sciences, Wills Memorial Building, from Wednesday 25 July. For the past six months, artist and sculptor, Alice Cunningham has been working as an artist-in-residence as part of the School's EarthArt programme which encourages local artists to work with members academics on an art-science collaborative project.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 23.07.2018
Ocean acidification to hit levels not seen in 14 million years
The world's oceans are likely to become more acidic than at any time in the past 14 million years, scientists have found. New research led by Cardiff University has shown that under a ‘business-as-usual' scenario of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, ocean acidification is likely to hit unprecedented levels.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 20.07.2018
How plants use carbon affects their response to climate change
How plants use carbon affects their response to climate change
Under warmer conditions, plants can take up more carbon dioxide by using carbon more efficiently for growth, shows a new study. Plants take in - or ‘fix' - carbon dioxide from the atmosphere during photosynthesis. Some of the carbon is used for plant growth, and some of it is used in respiration, where the plant breaks down sugars to get energy.

Earth Sciences - 19.07.2018
Deep groundwater in coastal deltas resilient to contamination
Groundwater pumped from the depths of the coastal Bengal Basin supporting more than 80 million people is largely secure from contamination, according to new research by UCL and the British Geological Survey. The study shows that groundwater pumped from depths below 150m in the coastal regions of the Bengal Basin is thousands of years old, and generally secure from contamination by salinity and arsenic found in shallow groundwater.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 12.07.2018
Great Britain's coastal wetlands threatened by rising sea levels
Great Britain’s coastal wetlands threatened by rising sea levels
Marshlands in the south east of England could start to disappear from the year 2040 due to rapid sea level rise, according to new research involving Durham University scientists. Using data from more than 800 sediment cores which record how salt marshes responded to variable rates of sea-level rise over the past 10,000 years, the researchers estimate that marshes in the south east of England could start to disappear from the year 2040, and across all of Great Britain by 2100.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 25.06.2018
Who shares experiences of climate change in a 1.5°C world and beyond?
A new framework to understand how uneven the effects of a 1.5°C world are for different countries around the world has been published today in Geophysical Research Letters, led by researchers from the Environmental Change Institute (ECI) at the Oxford University Department of Geography. It has been long understood that climate change will affect some regions more severely than others.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 11.06.2018
Rising CO2 may increase dangerous weather extremes, whatever happens to global temperatures
Rising CO2 may increase dangerous weather extremes, whatever happens to global temperatures
New research from the University of Oxford and collaborators at several other institutions, including the University of Bristol, provides compelling evidence that meeting the global warming target of 1.5°C may not be enough to limit the damage caused by extreme weather. The paper, published today , demonstrates that higher atmospheric CO2 concentrations directly increase temperature and rainfall extremes, meaning there could be dangerous changes in these extremes even if the global mean temperature rise remains within 1.5°C.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 08.06.2018
Rising CO2 may increase dangerous weather extremes, whatever happens to global temperatures
New research from the University of Oxford and collaborators at several other institutions provides compelling evidence that meeting the global warming target of 1.5°C may not be enough to limit the damage caused by extreme weather. The paper, published today , demonstrates that higher atmospheric CO2 concentrations directly increase temperature and rainfall extremes, meaning there could be dangerous changes in these extremes even if the global mean temperature rise remains within 1.5°C.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 07.06.2018
Scientists propose changing the rules of history to avoid environmental collapse
Scientists propose changing the rules of history to avoid environmental collapse
For the first time in our planet's 4.5 billion-year history a single species, humans, is increasingly dictating its future, according to a new book by UCL scientists.

Earth Sciences - Life Sciences - 25.05.2018
Dino-bird dandruff research head and shoulders above rest
Dino-bird dandruff research head and shoulders above rest
Palaeontologists from University College Cork (UCC) in Ireland have discovered 125 million-year-old dandruff preserved amongst the plumage of feathered dinosaurs and early birds, revealing the first evidence of how dinosaurs shed their skin. UCC's Dr Maria McNamara and her team studied the fossil cells, and dandruff from modern birds, with powerful electron microscopes for “The fossil cells are preserved with incredible detail - right down to the level of nanoscale keratin fibrils.

Earth Sciences - 17.05.2018
Pass the toothpick! Feeding habits of ancient elephant relatives uncovered from grass fragments stuck in their teeth
Pass the toothpick! Feeding habits of ancient elephant relatives uncovered from grass fragments stuck in their teeth
A new study, led by scientists at the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) in Beijing, China, including University of Bristol PhD student Zhang Hanwen, examined the feeding habits of ancient elephant relatives that inhabited Central Asia some 17 million years ago. Professor Wang Shiqi from IVPP, the study's senior author, said: “We found ancient elephant teeth in the Junggar Basin, in China's far North West and they belong to two species, Gomphotherium connexum , and the larger G .

Environment - Earth Sciences - 16.05.2018
Special issue of Royal Society magazine highlights scale of oceanic change
Special issue of Royal Society magazine highlights scale of oceanic change
The seas around the West Antarctic Peninsula have experienced some of the fastest global warming in recent decades, increasing the rate and richness of biological activity in the region. Innovative analytical techniques and collaborative research projects involving scientists from around the world are helping to improve our understanding of the causes and consequences of environmental change.

Earth Sciences - Life Sciences - 04.05.2018
Feeling the beat through the elephants feet
Iconic and intelligent creatures, elephants continue to fascinate curious onlookers and scientists alike. Now, a new Oxford University collaboration with Save The Elephants, has shown that elephant behaviour can be determined in a new way: through the vibrations they create. The findings of the study, published in the journal Current Biology, offer a new way to detect elephants and discern their behaviour without having them in sight.

Earth Sciences - History / Archeology - 03.05.2018
Scientists call for ’open-skies’ imagery policy over Israel and Palestine
A 2013 CNES/Airbus satellite image of a new site that could be identified because looting pits over the site are visible on high-resolution satellite imagery. Map data ©2018 Google. New Oxford University research has called for an 'open-skies policy' around the availability of high resolution satellite imagery of Israel and Palestine.  Since 1997, the Kyl-Bingaman Amendment  (KBA) to the 1997 U.S. National Defense Authorization Act, has limited the availability of high-resolution satellite imagery of these countries.

Earth Sciences - 02.05.2018
Weather forecast model predicts complex patterns of volcanic ash dispersal
Weather forecast model predicts complex patterns of volcanic ash dispersal
New research, led by the University of Bristol, has provided fresh insight into how huge volcanic ash plumes, which can critically disrupt aviation and cause major impact on the ground, are transported in the atmosphere. In 2010, the eruption of the Icelandic volcano EyjafjallajÓ§kull caused widespread travel chaos, with the cancellation of more than 100,000 flights and economic losses of $200 million per day.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 27.04.2018
How landscapes and landforms ’remember’ or ’forget’ their initial formations
The answer to the question 'What's in a shape?' hinges on this memory property. Megan Davies Wykes Crescent dunes and meandering rivers can 'forget' their initial shapes as they are carved and reshaped by wind and water while other landforms keep a memory of their past shape, suggests new research. "Asking how these natural sculptures come to be is more than mere curiosity because locked in their shapes are clues to the history of an environment," said Leif Ristroph from New York University and the senior author of the paper , which is published in the journal Physical Review Fluids .

Earth Sciences - 27.04.2018
South Korean earthquake linked to nearby fracking
An earthquake in South Korea which injured close to 100 people and caused tens of millions of pounds of damage was plausibly the result of nearby hydraulic fracturing works, scientists say. In a new paper published today (Thursday 26 April) , researchers from the University of Glasgow, ETH-Zurich in Switzerland, and GFZ-Potsdam in Germany report on detailed seismological analysis of the magnitude 5.5 earthquake which occurred near the city of Pohang in November 2017.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 16.04.2018
Dinosaurs ended - and originated - with a bang!
Dinosaurs ended - and originated - with a bang!
It is commonly understood that the dinosaurs disappeared with a bang - wiped out by a great meteorite impact on the Earth 66 million years ago. But their origins have been less understood. In a new study, scientists from MUSE - Museum of Science, Trento, Italy, Universities of Ferrara and Padova, Italy and the University of Bristol show that the key expansion of dinosaurs was also triggered by a crisis - a mass extinction that happened 232 million years ago.