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Chemistry



Results 61 - 80 of 497.


Physics - Chemistry - 08.03.2018
Plastic fantastic – researchers turn plastic pollution into cleaners
Plastic fantastic – researchers turn plastic pollution into cleaners
Scientists at the University of Bristol have discovered a way to re-use a common plastic to break down harmful dyes in our waste water. The paper published in ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces by a joint UK and Brazilian research team describes how synthetic dyes, used in the clothing industry world-wide, could be treated by the plastic found in packaging and cutlery - polystyrene.

Chemistry - Innovation / Technology - 27.02.2018
Alternative to traditional batteries moves a step closer to reality after exciting progress in supercapacitor technology
Alternative to traditional batteries moves a step closer to reality after exciting progress in supercapacitor technology
Lithium-ion batteries could be under threat after the development of polymer materials by the Universities of Bristol and Surrey, along with Superdielectrics Ltd, that could challenge the dominance of these traditional batteries - and they are ready to demonstrate their results. Only one year ago, the partners announced scientific results for novel polymer materials that have dielectric properties 1,000 to 10,000 times greater than existing electrolytes (electrical conductors).

Physics - Chemistry - 26.02.2018
Supercomputer model reveals how sticky tape makes graphene
Supercomputer model reveals how sticky tape makes graphene
Scientists at UCL have explained for the first time the mystery of why adhesive tape is so useful for graphene production. The study, published in Advanced Materials , used supercomputers to model the process through which graphene sheets are exfoliated from graphite, the material in pencils.  Graphene is known for being the strongest material in the world, lightweight and with extraordinary electrical, thermal and optical properties.

Health - Chemistry - 22.02.2018
Carbon monoxide detection in the body could lead to rapid disease diagnostics
A quick and reliable way to detect levels of carbon monoxide in the body could allow clinicians to diagnose disease. Carbon monoxide is normally considered in terms of the amount of damage it can cause us, but a team of scientists at Imperial College London and the Polytechnic University of Valencia have been looking at the other biological roles it can play.

Chemistry - 16.02.2018
Complex plants were first to conquer land
The first plants to conquer land were a much more complex species than has previously been assumed, new research has shown. Before the first land plants appeared on Earth around half a billion years ago, Earth would have looked unrecognisable with no grass, trees or even mosses. Up until now, mosses and their relatives the hornworts and liverworts have been regarded as the first true plants on dry land.

Health - Chemistry - 12.02.2018
Lung cancer drug resistance explained by computer simulations
Lung cancer drug resistance explained by computer simulations
Scientists from the Universities of Bristol and Parma, Italy, have used molecular simulations to understand resistance to osimertinib - an anticancer drug used to treat types of lung cancer. Osimertinib binds tightly to a protein, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is overexpressed in many tumours.

Chemistry - Earth Sciences - 06.02.2018
Ozone at lower latitudes is not recovering, despite Antarctic ozone hole healing
Ozone at lower latitudes is not recovering, despite Antarctic ozone hole healing
The ozone layer is recovering at the poles, but unexpected decreases in part of the atmosphere may be preventing recovery at lower latitudes. Global ozone has been declining since the 1970s owing to certain man-made chemicals. Since these were banned, parts of the layer have been recovering, particularly at the poles.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 05.02.2018
When did flowers originate?
When did flowers originate?
Flowering plants likely originated between 149 and 256 million years ago according to new UCL-led research. The study, published today in New Phytologist by researchers from the UK and China, shows that flowering plants are neither as old as suggested by previous molecular studies, nor as young as a literal interpretation of their fossil record.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 05.02.2018
When did flowers originate?
When did flowers originate?
Flowering plants likely originated between 149 and 256 million years ago according to new UCL-led research, co-authored by the University of Bristol. The study, published today in New Phytologist by researchers from the UK and China, shows that flowering plants are neither as old as suggested by previous molecular studies, nor as young as a literal interpretation of their fossil record.

Physics - Chemistry - 23.01.2018
Adding graphene girders to silicon electrodes could double the life of lithium batteries
New research led by WMG, at the University of Warwick has found an effective approach to replacing graphite in the anodes of lithium-ion batteries using silicon, by reinforcing the anode's structure with graphene girders. This could more than double the life of rechargeable lithium-ion based batteries and also increase the capacity delivered by those batteries.

Chemistry - Health - 19.01.2018
Chemical ’MP3 Player’ breakthrough converts digital code into pharmaceuticals
A new method of drug manufacture which uses 3D printers to create pharmaceuticals on demand could lead to a ‘Spotify for chemistry', scientists claim. In a new paper published today (January 19) in the journal Science, researchers from the University of Glasgow present for the first time a new approach to the manufacture of pharmaceuticals which can be made using a digital code.

Computer Science / Telecom - Chemistry - 15.01.2018
Protocells with unpredictable complexity tamed by artificial intelligence
In new University of Glasgow research published today (January 15) in the journal PNAS , a robot equipped with artificial intelligence was able to build unstable oil-in-water droplets as models for new artificial life forms. It was also able to predict their properties ahead of time even though conventional physical methods failed to do so.

Health - Chemistry - 09.01.2018
Cancer targeted with reusable ’stinging nettle’ treatment
Cancer cells killed more effectively and selectively with a new approach, using a substance found in stinging nettles & ants - new University of Warwick research New treatment JPC11 can be recycled and reused within cancer cells to attack them repeatedly - a unique approach in the fight against cancer Could lessen side-effects of chemotherapy and overcome increasing resistance of cancer cells to existing drugs Research published Cancer cells

Health - Chemistry - 05.01.2018
New tool to assess largely ignored risk in pharmaceutical industry
A new method to test the likelihood of a drug turning into a potentially harmful version of itself when it enters the body has been developed by researchers at Cardiff University. In collaboration with Liverpool John Moores University and AstraZeneca, the team have developed a simple approach to trawl through large databases of pharmaceutical drugs and assess the likely risk of a drug undergoing racemisation - a process in which a drug flips into a mirror image of itself and becomes either inert or potentially dangerous.

Health - Chemistry - 27.12.2017
Which Imperial research papers topped the charts in 2017?
Which Imperial research papers topped the charts in 2017?
Harvesting energy from our movements and a method for determining the composition of cement were two of the most widely downloaded papers in 2017. Spiral - Imperial College London's open access repository - allows academics to make journal articles and other research outputs open access, meeting the requirements of the post-2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF).

Computer Science / Telecom - Chemistry - 26.12.2017
Five AI breakthroughs that could change the face of science
Five AI breakthroughs that could change the face of science
Following years of research, AI is starting to have an impact on the way science is done, as these five Imperial studies from 2017 show. Barely a week has gone by in 2017 without warnings in the media about how Artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics is threatening to make all human workers redundant.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 13.12.2017
Even wild mammals have regional dialects
Researchers from Cardiff University's Otter Project have discovered that genetically distinct populations of wild otters from across the UK have their own regional odours for communicating vital information to each other. The findings could have implications for wild mammal conservation efforts. The study, which profiled chemical secretions from the Eurasian otter, suggests that genetically distinct populations of wild mammals have different odour dialects, which may have been driven by geographical separation.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 28.11.2017
Complications at birth associated with lasting chemical changes in the brain
New King's College London research, published today in eLife , shows that adults born prematurely - who also suffered small brain injuries around the time of birth - have lower levels of dopamine in the brain. This chemical change has been linked to lack of motivation and enjoyment in normal life, and changes to attention and concentration, which could all be early signs of more serious mental health issues such as substance dependence and depression.

Chemistry - Health - 09.11.2017
Fatty molecule in human blood controls malaria parasites' decision to leap to mosquitoes
Fatty molecule in human blood controls malaria parasites’ decision to leap to mosquitoes
Depletion of a fatty molecule in human blood propels malaria parasites to stop replicating and causing illness in people and instead to jump ship to mosquitoes to continue the transmission cycle, according to a new study by an international research team co-led by the University of Glasgow. The discovery, published online in Cell, answers a longstanding question about what controls this critical step in the life cycle of Plasmodium falciparum , the parasite responsible for about half a million malaria deaths worldwide each year.

Earth Sciences - Chemistry - 18.10.2017
48-million-year-old wax discovered in a bird fossil
48-million-year-old wax discovered in a bird fossil
Researchers have analysed a well-preserved preening gland in a 48-million-year-old bird fossil and discovered original oil and wax molecules within it. The fossil is from the famous Messel locality in Germany, well known to preserve birds, mammals, fish, reptiles, insects and leaves with exceptional details.