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Life Sciences - Chemistry - 25.03.2010
DNA sequencing pioneer is Innovator of the Year 2010
DNA sequencing pioneer is Innovator of the Year 2010
Cambridge Professor Shankar Balasubramanian has been named Innovator of the Year by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC). The prize, worth £10,000, is for his work on Solexa sequencing, the high speed genome sequencing technology that means it is now possible to sequence a human genome for less than $10,000.

Physics - Chemistry - 24.03.2010
Shells, silicon & neighbourly atoms
Shells, silicon & neighbourly atoms
As Andrew Goodwin of Oxford University's Department of Chemistry explains this irregularity is important: it's what allows shells to grow their curved edges and gives silicon its incredibly useful electronic properties. ‘Our main technique for establishing what materials look like on the atomic scale is crystallography ,' Andrew tells me, ‘and this relies explicitly on the existence of a repeating arrangement of atoms in order to work.

Environment - Chemistry - 22.02.2010
39 Steps to understanding Ocean Acidification
Plymouth marine scientists have joined with international colleagues to help educate the public about "ocean acidification," the scientific details of which are intricate and sometimes counterintuitive. Twenty-seven scientists from five countries worked together to produce and distribute a document to provide accessible and accurate answers to the most commonly asked questions about this growing problem.

Physics - Chemistry - 16.02.2010
Astronomers unveil atmospheres of far-away planets
Astronomers unveil atmospheres of far-away planets
The discovery and characterisation of a planet with an Earth-like atmosphere is a step closer thanks to a new observation technique, developed by astronomers at NASA and UCL, using small ground-based telescopes. Published today in Nature , astronomers have identified organic molecules in the atmosphere of a Jupiter-sized planet nearly 63 light years away.

Physics - Chemistry - 07.02.2010
Ingredients for life present on Saturnian moon, say UCL scientists
Ingredients for life present on Saturnian moon, say UCL scientists
A team from the Mullard Space Science Laboratory working on the Cassini-Huygens mission have found negatively charged water ions in the ice plume of Enceladus. † MSSL's Professor Andrew Coates, lead author of a paper on the latest discovery, said: ‘While it's no surprise that there is water there, these short-lived ions are extra evidence for sub-surface water and where there's water, carbon and energy, some of the major ingredients for life are present.

Physics - Chemistry - 26.01.2010
Black hole hunters set new distance record
Black hole hunters set new distance record
Using the European Southern Observatory´s Very Large Telescope (VLT), astronomers from the University of Sheffield have detected a stellar mass black hole much farther away than any other previously known. The newly discovered black hole is in the spiral galaxy NGC 300, about six million light years away from the Sun.

Chemistry - 14.01.2010
Professor wins Institution of Chemical Engineers medal
Professor wins Institution of Chemical Engineers medal
Professor Haroun Mahgerfeteh has won a prestigious medal for a paper on the feasibility of transporting captured carbon dioxide (CO2) along a pipeline. Professor Mahgerfeteh (UCL Chemical Engineering) won the 2009†Institution of Chemical Engineers Frank Lees Medal for the most meritorious publication on the topic of 'safety and loss prevention' in any IChemE publication, including journals, books, conference proceedings and web resources.

Health - Chemistry - 15.12.2009
Oldest case of leprosy found in 1st century tomb
Analysis of human remains buried in the 1st century 'Tomb of the Shroud? in Jerusalem has revealed evidence of ancient leprosy and tuberculosis. The new research, involving UCL researchers, is published in the journal PLoS One today. This is the first time that a 1st century tomb from Jerusalem has been investigated by molecular methods.

Health - Chemistry - 20.11.2009
Largest mass extinction linked to 21st century lung cancer epidemic
Largest mass extinction linked to 21st century lung cancer epidemic
The geologic conditions that very nearly annihilated life 250 million years ago are still killing people today. Parts of Xuan Wei County in Yunnan Province in China have the world"§ s highest known death rates from lung cancer in non-smoking women. For thirty years the region, which uses locally mined coal for domestic cooking and heating, has been the focus of intense scientific research to establish a cause.

Physics - Chemistry - 06.10.2009
Scientists give insight into movement of molecules
Scientists at the University of Sheffield have made an exciting breakthrough in the control of the movement of single molecules. The findings represent a significant step forward in the field of molecular nanotechnology, which requires such control to achieve self-assembling nano-machines. This could potentially lead to the development of a method to send artificial drugs to their targets, or the creation of self-healing structures which could naturally repair tears in a surface.

Chemistry - Physics - 28.09.2009
Licence to go where no chemist has gone before
Licence to go where no chemist has gone before
PA 253/09 Scientists at The University of Nottingham have overcome one of the significant research challenges facing electrochemists. For the first time they have found a way of probing right into the heart of an electrochemical reaction. Their breakthrough will help scientists understand how catalysts work.

Chemistry - Environment - 16.06.2009
Effects of plastic on the environment revealed
A University of Plymouth lecturer is the lead author of a prestigious new Royal Society publication examining the effects of plastics on the environment and human health. Richard Thompson, who is one of the foremost researchers on this topical subject, was chosen to edit the 180 page special issue of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B which is published online today pending hard copy publication towards the end of the summer.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 01.06.2009
Scientists Solve Poppy Puzzle with New Gene Discovery
Scientists at the University of Birmingham have identified an elusive male gene in the field poppy that stops self-fertilization, a mechanism that prevents inbreeding, and promotes greater genetic diversity. Plant biologists had already uncovered that poppies prevent self-fertilization when a female gene on the stigma tells it which pollen to accept or reject, triggering several chemical signals to stop pollen tube growth.

Health - Chemistry - 24.03.2009
Anti-microbial catheter to cut infection risk for dialysis patients
Anti-microbial catheter to cut infection risk for dialysis patients
PA84/09 Medical experts at The University of Nottingham have shown that an innovative anti-microbial catheter could vastly improve treatment and the quality of life for many community-based dialysis patients. Results of a study published in the leading journal Biomaterials, have shown that the catheter has the potential to ward off attack from a wider variety of pathogens and protect Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis (CAPD) patients from infections for up to 100 days — around 20 times longer than current catheters.

Chemistry - Mechanical Engineering - 18.03.2009
Engineers Invent New Process to Make Foundries Greener
Engineers at the University of Birmingham, with local company, Ntec, have invented a new casting process that could reduce the energy costs of light-metal foundries. The technology, called CRIMSON, means that foundries need only heat the quantity of metal required to fill a single mould rather than whole batches that use unnecessary energy and create waste.

Chemistry - Computer Science / Telecom - 04.03.2009
UCL’s Sophia magazine publishes second issue
‘Sophia' has just published its second issue, featuring articles on subjects as diverse as deep-space chemistry, fibromyalgia in 'The Princess and the Pea' and the measurement of global happiness, as well as images produced in the course of research. The new issue also includes an article by Professor Donald Gillies (UCL Science & Technology Studies) on how peer-review based assessment exercises such as the RAE ‘risk ending the careers of truly talented researchers yet to be recognised by the academic community at large'.

Health - Chemistry - 24.01.2009
Chemical commonly used in rubber product manufacture may cause cancer
A chemical, commonly used in the manufacture of rubber products, may cause cancer in workers regularly exposed to it, according to research published today ahead of print in Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The researchers from the University of Birmingham's Institute of Occupational and Environmental Medicine found higher than expected rates of diagnosis and death from a number of cancers, amongst men working at a rubber plant in North Wales.
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