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Careers / Employment - 22.11.2018
Call for 'whole-system approach' to tackle workplace mental health issue gaps
Representatives from across industry have called for a whole-system approach to mental health in the workplace, as a new study revealed gaps in the way organisations tackle issues such as depression, anxiety, self-harm and psychosis. Published by the Institution of Occupational Safety and Health (IOSH), findings from research by The University of Nottingham reveals both positives and areas for concern, including inadequate boundaries for employees and a lack of proof that MHFA is effective.

Careers / Employment - 19.11.2018
Will algorithms predict your future?
A report from Cardiff University reveals the extent to which public service provision is now being influenced by data analytics. The study, Data Scores as Governance , represents the culmination of a year-long research project compiled by the School of Journalism, Media and Culture's Data Justice Lab.

Innovation / Technology - Careers / Employment - 09.10.2018
£13.3m boost for Oxford’s Future of Humanity Institute
Oxford University's Future of Humanity Institute (FHI) is to benefit from a donation of up to £13.3 million from the philanthropic organisations Good Ventures and the Open Philanthropy Project. The donation, which includes a £6 million up-front commitment, with further funds earmarked for the recruitment of staff, is the largest in the history of the Faculty of Philosophy at Oxford.

Careers / Employment - 02.10.2018
Using AI to improve refugee integration
Using machine learning and optimisation to find refugees' new homes can significantly improve their chances of finding work within three months, according to new research. The international collaboration, conducted by researchers at the Universities of Oxford and Lund, Sweden as well as the Worcester Polytechnic Institute, involved developing Annie MOORE, an AI-powered software.

Careers / Employment - 27.09.2018
Women much less likely to ask questions in academic seminars than men
Women much less likely to ask questions in academic seminars than men
A new study reveals a stark disparity between male and female participation in a key area of academic life and offers recommendations to ensure all voices are heard. Junior scholars are encountering fewer visible female role models Alecia Carter Women are two and a half times less likely to ask a question in departmental seminars than men, an observational study of 250 events at 35 academic institutions in 10 countries has found.

Mathematics - Careers / Employment - 15.08.2018
Universities "must look deeper" into the drivers of inequality within research
Universities must seek a deeper understanding of the drivers of inequality in job roles and academic ranks if they are to achieve change. Professor Axel Gandy (Chair in Statistics, Imperial College London), Dr Georg Hahn (Senior Research Associate in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at Lancaster University) and Professor Nick Jennings (Vice Provost for Research at Imperial College London) have looked at possible inequalities relating to grant application success rates within Imperial over a five-year period.

Careers / Employment - Computer Science / Telecom - 08.08.2018
Digital gig economy is bad for your wellbeing, new research suggests
The poor quality working conditions associated with the digital gig economy may have consequences for employees' wellbeing, according to new Oxford University research. The poor quality working conditions associated with the digital gig economy may have consequences for employees' wellbeing, according to new Oxford University research.

Careers / Employment - Computer Science / Telecom - 08.08.2018
Digital gig economy is bad for your wellbeing
The poor quality working conditions associated with the digital gig economy may have consequences for employees' wellbeing, according to new Oxford University research. The poor quality working conditions associated with the digital gig economy may have consequences for employees' wellbeing, according to new Oxford University research.

Careers / Employment - Politics - 30.07.2018
Decline in working class politicians, shifted Labour towards right wing policy
The decline in working-class MPs and rise of career politicians shifted the Labour Party towards a more right wing policy stance on welfare, according to a new study by UCL. The research, published in Comparative Political Studies , examined the policy preferences of working-class and career politicians within the Labour Party both pre and during Tony Blair's leadership of the Labour Party.  The study shows that working-class MPs were substantially more in favour of traditional welfare policies than their careerist colleagues.

Careers / Employment - Business / Economics - 19.07.2018
Most employees can work smarter, given the chance
More than half (58%) of employees in Britain can identify changes at work which would make them more productive, a research team drawn from UCL Institute of Education (IOE), Cardiff University and Nuffield College, Oxford has found. These findings are published today in the Skills and Employment Survey (2017).

Philosophy - Careers / Employment - 12.07.2018
Bridging the divide: philosophy meets science
A unique three-year project to bridge the divide between science and philosophy - which embedded early-career philosophers into some of Cambridge's ground-breaking scientific research clusters - is the subject of a new film released today. Academics in the humanities as well as the sciences are beginning to appreciate some of the difficulties arising from the extreme degrees of specialisation - where we are losing the ability to talk to each other.

Careers / Employment - Business / Economics - 12.07.2018
Legislating labour in the long run - how worker rights help economies
Legislating labour in the long run - how worker rights help economies
Researchers have built the single largest dataset of employment laws - spanning more than 100 countries across much of post-war history - to look at how worker rights affect economies over decades.     Complex data of this nature may well prove helpful when exploring crucial issues for the future of society, such as how to combine social justice with economic growth Simon Deakin There's a familiar story that goes something like this: the post-war

Health - Careers / Employment - 10.07.2018
Imperial showcases work to improve patients’ experience of NHS services
Virtual exercise games for rehabilitation and a robotic rectum to detect prostate cancer were on display at a special showcase event. The St Mary's Patient Experience Hub is an initiative designed to use medical simulation and tools to improve the experience of patients and families at St Mary's Hospital.

Innovation / Technology - Careers / Employment - 05.07.2018
Humans need not apply
Humans need not apply
Will automation, AI and robotics mean a jobless future, or will their productivity free us to innovate and explore? Is the impact of new technologies to be feared, or a chance to rethink the structure of our working lives and ensure a fairer future for all? If routine cognitive tasks are taken over by AI, how do professions develop their future experts? Stella Pachidi On googling ‘will a robot take my job'' I find myself on a BBC webpage that invites me to discover the likelihood that my work will be automated in the next 20 years.

Politics - Careers / Employment - 05.07.2018
Barriers continue to prevent potential Assembly candidates from standing, report concludes
Action is needed to encourage a wider range of people from underrepresented groups to enter politics, academics say. The team from Cardiff University's Wales Governance Centre and London Metropolitan University studied what motivates and discourages people from considering running for election to the National Assembly.

Health - Careers / Employment - 04.07.2018
Care provided by specialist cancer nurses helps improve life expectancy of patients with lung cancer, says new study
A new study looking at the picture of lung cancer care in England finds that patients with lung cancer experience significantly better outcomes in terms of life expectancy, avoiding unnecessary hospital admissions and managing the effects of treatment when cared for by specialist lung cancer nurses. The research, entitled Can nurse specialist working practices reduce the burdens of lung cancer? was presented at the National Cancer Registration and Analysis Service (NCRAS) conference on 21 June 2018.

Health - Careers / Employment - 26.06.2018
Social awkwardness scuppers standing meetings
Standing during meetings could help keep office workers healthy, but new research from King's College London and Brunel University London suggests it's hard to resist keeping our seats when standing up breaks social rules. Office workers make up half the UK working population and spend approximately two-thirds of their working days seated.

Environment - Careers / Employment - 25.06.2018
Researchers join new initiative on urban air pollution
Cambridge researchers are part of a cutting-edge project unveiled by Mayor of London Sadiq Khan last week to better understand Londoners' exposure to air pollution and improve air quality in the capital. Addressing air pollution in cities is a vital but complex challenge. Rod Jones As part of the initiative, a network of air quality sensors will be deployed across the capital, measuring pollution levels in tens of thousands of locations.

Health - Careers / Employment - 18.06.2018
Babies are most likely to be born at 4am
Babies are most likely to be born at 4am
Just over half of all births following spontaneous onset of labour occur between 1am and 7am with a peak around 4 am, according to a new study involving UCL, City, University of London and the National Childbirth Trust (NCT).

Careers / Employment - Business / Economics - 18.06.2018
How emotions shape our work life
How emotions shape our work life
Jochen Menges, an expert in organisational behaviour, thinks that emotions matter profoundly for employee performance and behaviour. His studies bring nuance to our understanding of how employees wish to feel at work. A bit of emotion, a bit of up and down - that's what makes work meaningful Jochen Menges It is important for people to feel happy rather than miserable in their work - research shows that contented employees deliver better results after all.
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