« BACK

Business/Economics



Results 1 - 20 of 333.
1 2 3 4 5 ... 17 Next »


Business / Economics - 12.04.2019
Brexit wasn’t triggered by the old and unhappy, but by financial worries
People's feelings about their own financial situation had the greatest influence on them voting to leave the EU, according to new research which challenges the widely-held belief that it was the old and unhappy who swung the Brexit vote. Academics at the Universities of Bristol, Warwick and ETH Zurich, analysed the views of 8,000 prospective voters to determine what factors led to anti-EU sentiment.

Business / Economics - Environment - 12.04.2019
No more Hoover dams: Hydropowered countries suffer higher levels of poverty, corruption and debt
No more Hoover dams: Hydropowered countries suffer higher levels of poverty, corruption and debt
Countries relying on the world's biggest and most established source of renewable electricity have seen their poverty, corruption and debt levels rise and their economy slow at significantly greater rates than nations which use other energy resources over the last three decades, a major new study has found.

Business / Economics - Law / Forensics - 12.04.2019
Knife crime: assault data can help forecast fatal stabbings
Police at a crime scene in Leyton, east London after a man in his twenties was stabbed to death in March of this year. Credit: PA. Police at a crime scene in Leyton, east London after a man in his twenties was stabbed to death in March of this year. Credit: PA. Knife crime data from a 12-month period could be used to help forecast the London neighbourhoods most likely to suffer a fatal stabbing the following year, according to latest research.

Business / Economics - 29.03.2019
Get her off my screen - female reality contestants prove unpopular with viewers
PA. 70/19 Female contestants in the reality show Big Brother are unpopular among viewers in countries across the globe, according to a new study. The findings could have important implications for the existence of gender discrimination in the entertainment industry. Women contestants proved particularly unpopular in the UK, where being female roughly doubled a housemate's probability of losing any given audience vote during the show's 18-year life-span.

Business / Economics - Agronomy / Food Science - 14.03.2019
Managers in global supply chains need to do more to tackle modern slavery
More needs to be done to tackle modern slavery in supply chains in Brazil - one of the world's biggest suppliers of beef and an important source of timber. Whilst some businesses in Brazil are already putting measures in place to tackle modern slavery in their supply chains, there is a lack of consistency in approach, action is voluntary, and initiatives are frequently limited to specific communities or locations, according to new research.

Business / Economics - 11.01.2019
Gamblers predicted Brexit before financial traders
Gamblers predicted Brexit before financial traders
Research shows how financial markets should have predicted Brexit hours before they eventually did, and that betting markets beat currency markets to the result by an hour - producing a "close to risk-free" profit-making opportunity, according to economists.   It looks like the gamblers had a better sense that Leave could win, or that it could at least go either way Tom Auld International finance markets lagged behind punters having a flutter whe

Computer Science / Telecom - Business / Economics - 14.12.2018
Cryptocurrency manipulation schemes could be found and foiled by new algorithm
Imperial scientists have created an algorithm to predict when specific cryptocoins are at risk of 'pump-and-dump' schemes. The algorithm could help market regulators predict and prevent cryptocurrency schemes that sees traders spend seven million US Dollars per month, only to find the price of their purchased currency falls as the scheme unfolds.

Business / Economics - 13.12.2018
Study calls for stricter regulation of elusive rabbit breeding industry
Rabbits are one of the most popular pets in the UK and yet little is known about where these very cute and appealing animals come from. Now a new study by researchers at the Universities of Nottingham and Winchester has shed light on this elusive industry, calling for more to be done to regulate and improve the breeding of rabbits as pets.

Health - Business / Economics - 11.12.2018
Grandfather’s high access to food increases grandson’s mortality risk
New research has revealed how a paternal grandfather's access to abundant food as a young boy causes their grandsons to have a higher risk of dying. The findings, published today , show that good access to food at the pre-pubescent age of nine to 12 means their grandsons - but not their granddaughters - die on average earlier, especially from cancer.

Business / Economics - 08.11.2018
Online labour platforms offer growing alternative to traditional offshoring
Online labour platforms that connect freelance workers and clients around the world are emerging as an alternative to traditional offshoring, according to new Oxford University research. Workers from emerging economies in particular are benefitting from these networks according to the study conducted by researchers at the Oxford Internet Institute.

Physics - Business / Economics - 07.11.2018
Depth of Vision
HORIBA Scientific has developed for QuantIC, the UK Quantum Technology Hub in Quantum Enhanced Imaging, Time-Correlated Single-Photon Counting (TCSPC), electronics to support its research into real-time computational 3D imaging and Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR). This research has the potential to result in faster, better quality and lower-cost 3D imaging for applications that include autonomous vehicles, machine learning, security and surveying.

Business / Economics - 29.10.2018
Codifying impacts of cyber attack
Cyber-security researchers have   identified a total of at least 57 different ways in which cyber-attacks can have a negative impact on individuals, businesses and even nations, ranging from threats to life, causing depression, regulatory fines or disrupting daily activities. Researchers, from the  Department of Computer Science  at the University of Oxford and Kent's  School of Computing  set out to define and codify the different ways in which the various cyber-incidents being witnessed today can have   negative outcomes.

Business / Economics - 25.10.2018
Children and young people could be under the influence of TV alcohol advertising
TV advertising could be responsible for encouraging young people to drink alcohol, a study led by The University of Nottingham has revealed. The research, published in the Journal of Public Health and involving researchers from the University of Bath, showed that alcohol imagery on UK television is extremely common, appearing in more than half of all programmes and almost half of all advertising breaks between programmes.

Administration - Business / Economics - 08.10.2018
Austerity cuts 'twice as deep' in England as rest of Britain
Austerity cuts ’twice as deep’ in England as rest of Britain
Research finds significant inequalities in cuts to council services across the country, with deprived areas in the north of England and London seeing the biggest drops in local authority spending since 2010. Public finance is politics hidden in accounting columns Mia Gray A "fine-grained" analysis of local authority budgets across Britain since 2010 has found that the average reduction in service spending by councils was almost 24% in England compared to just 12% in Wales and 11.5% in Scotland.

Administration - Business / Economics - 08.10.2018
Austerity cuts 'twice as deep' in England than rest of Britain
Austerity cuts ’twice as deep’ in England than rest of Britain
Latest research finds significant inequalities in cuts to council services across the country, with deprived areas in the north of England and London seeing the biggest drops in local authority spending since 2010. The government needs to decide whether it is content for more local authorities to essentially go bust Mia Gray The first "fine-grained" analysis of local authority budgets across Britain since 2010 has found that the average reduction in service spending by councils was almost 24% in England compared to just 12% in Wales and 11.5% in Scotland.

Psychology - Business / Economics - 13.09.2018
Emotionally stable people spend more on Christmas
Emotionally stable people spend more on Christmas
People who are more emotionally stable spend more during the Christmas season, while those who are high in neuroticism spend less, according to new research by UCL and Northwestern University. Those with more artistic interests, more active imaginations and who are more open minded spend less, whereas those who are more conscientious, plan ahead and are organised spend more in the lead-up to Christmas.

Psychology - Business / Economics - 12.09.2018
Emotionally stable people spend more at Christmas
Emotionally stable people spend more at Christmas
People who are more emotionally stable spend more during the Christmas season, while those who are high in neuroticism spend less, according to new research by UCL and Northwestern University. Those with more artistic interests, more active imaginations and who are more open minded spend less, whereas those who are more conscientious, plan ahead and are organised spend more in the lead-up to Christmas.

Business / Economics - 08.08.2018
Huge variance found in aspirations of school-leavers, depending on where they study
Schools can be hugely influential in students' choices about higher education, irrespective of the grades they achieve, research has found. The study, conducted at Cardiff University, followed the educational pathways of all Year 11 pupils across Wales between 2005 and 2007. When the only variable factor was the school they went to, the findings reveal that young people with the same grades made very different decisions about whether or not they went to university.

Health - Business / Economics - 02.08.2018
Bans on gluten-free prescribing save the NHS money in the short-term but the impact on patients is unclear
Full or partial bans on GPs prescribing gluten-free (GF) foods to people with coeliac disease save the NHS money in the short-term. But the impact on patients, especially those from deprived areas, is unknown, NIHR-funded researchers at the University of Bristol have warned. The study, which looked at prescribing data across 94 per cent of GP practices in England between 2012-2017, revealed more than a quarter of clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) have already either completely banned prescriptions of gluten-free foods to anyone with coeliac disease or banned prescriptions to adults.

Business / Economics - Social Sciences - 26.07.2018
Parents inclined to invest more, if child attends better quality school
Parents consider that spending money on learning resources such as books, educational games and private tuition for their children is more productive if the child attends a higher quality school, according to new research led by UCL. The study, which recently came out as a Human Capital and Economic Opportunity ( HCEO) Working Paper, was funded by the Nuffield Foundation.
1 2 3 4 5 ... 17 Next »