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Agronomy/Food Science



Results 61 - 80 of 226.


Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 02.11.2016
Sleep deprivation may cause people to eat more calories
Sleep deprivation may result in people consuming more calories during the following day, according to a systematic review and meta-analysis led by researchers at King's College London. The meta‑analysis combined the results of many previous small intervention studies to produce a more robust answer and found that sleep-deprived people consumed an average of 385 kcal per day extra, which is equivalent to the calories of about four and a half slices of bread.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 01.11.2016
New study provides food carbon footprint pecking order
New study provides food carbon footprint pecking order
Researchers have compiled the first comprehensive carbon footprint league table for fresh food so chefs, caterers and everyday foodies can cook meals without cooking the planet. The greenhouse gas emissions dataset by researchers at Lancaster University and RMIT University and will help consumers and catering firms calculate the environmental impact of the fresh food they eat and the menus they serve.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 17.10.2016
Replacing diet drinks with water can speed weight loss in obese women with type 2 diabetes, study finds
Experts in diet and metabolism have found that replacing low calorie ‘diet' drinks with water can help increase the rate of weight loss in obese women with type 2 diabetes and improve insulin sensitivity. The scientists at The University of Nottingham and Tehran University of Medical Sciences set out to test the effect of replacing diet drinks with water by comparing weight loss in two randomly selected groups of type 2 diabetic women during a 24 week diet programme.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 13.10.2016
Link between obese mothers and children's high blood pressure
Brain receptor identified as key link between obese mothers and high blood pressure in children Exposure of babies to high levels of the ‘fullness' hormone, leptin, in the womb irreversibly activates receptors in the brain that regulate blood pressure, according to a new study by researchers from King's College London, part-funded by the British Heart Foundation.

Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 04.10.2016
Chicken korma, Eton mess and a genetic variant provide clues to our food choices
People who carry variants in a particular gene have an increased preference for high fat food, but a decreased preference for sugary foods, according to a new study led by the University of Cambridge. The research has provided insights into why we make particular food choices, with potential implications for our understanding of obesity.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 16.09.2016
Healthy fat stem cells can protect against obesity-associated type 2 diabetes
Healthy fat stem cells can protect against obesity-associated type 2 diabetes
Obesity is responsible for the deaths of over three million people a year worldwide due to its associated diseases such as diabetes, cancer and cardiovascular disease. However, a subset of obese individuals seems to be protected from such diseases. Understanding the underlying protective mechanisms in the lower risk individuals could help design novel therapeutic strategies targeting those at higher risk of disease.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 31.08.2016
Is a trend for pink chicken livers making us sick?
People are being warned to take the current trend for ‘pink' chicken liver recipes with a pinch of salt. Research from Manchester, Bangor and Liverpool universities found that a current trend to serve ‘rare' chicken livers is potentially exposing the public to the risk of Campylobacter food poisoning.

Agronomy / Food Science - Health - 19.08.2016
Unhealthy diet during pregnancy could be linked to ADHD
Unhealthy diet during pregnancy could be linked to ADHD
New research led by scientists from King's College London and the University of Bristol has found that a high-fat, high-sugar diet during pregnancy may be linked to symptoms of ADHD in children who show conduct problems early in life. Published today in The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry , this study is the first to indicate that epigenetic changes evident at birth may explain the link between unhealthy diet, conduct problems and ADHD.

Agronomy / Food Science - Health - 18.08.2016
Unhealthy diet during pregnancy could be linked to ADHD
New research led by scientists from King's College London and the University of Bristol has found that a high-fat, high-sugar diet during pregnancy may be linked to symptoms of ADHD in children who show conduct problems early in life. Published today in The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry , this study is the first to indicate that epigenetic changes evident at birth may explain the link between unhealthy diet, conduct problems and ADHD.

Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 25.07.2016
Salad days - tomatoes that last longer and still taste good
The tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is one of the most valuable fruit crops in the world with an annual global value in excess of $50bn. We eat so many they also play an important role in our diet providing valuable vitamins, minerals and health promoting phytochemicals. Plant breeders are working continuously to supply high yielding, better tasting, more nutritious and longer lasting tomato varieties, but some of the best tasting varieties soften rapidly and can have a short shelf life.

Agronomy / Food Science - Health - 14.07.2016
Obesity linked to premature death, with greatest effect in men
A study of 3.9 million adults published today in The Lancet has found that being overweight or obese is associated with an increased risk of premature death. The risks of coronary heart disease, stroke, respiratory disease and cancer are all increased. Overall, the excess risk of premature death (before age 70) among those who are overweight or obese is about three times as great in men as in women.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 10.06.2016
Peanut allergy prevention strategy does not impact breastfeeding or nutrition, study shows
Introducing peanut-containing foods during infancy as a peanut allergy prevention strategy does not compromise the duration of breastfeeding or affect children's growth and nutritional intakes, new findings show. The work, carried out by researchers at King's College London and funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, is published today in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology .

Agronomy / Food Science - 17.05.2016
No link between eating dinner after 8pm and obesity in children
Researchers at King's College London have found no significant link between eating the evening meal after 8pm and excess weight in children, according to a paper published this month in the British Journal of Nutrition . Previous evidence suggested that the timing of food intake can have a significant impact on circadian rhythms (i.e.

Agronomy / Food Science - Health - 10.05.2016
Why is there a social divide in child obesity rates?
Why is there a social divide in child obesity rates?
Researchers from the University of Liverpool have identified important early life factors that contribute to childhood obesity rates being different for children from different socio-economic backgrounds. It is well known that overweight and obesity are more common among children from disadvantaged backgrounds, but it's not known how much of a role early life factors might have in this.

Agronomy / Food Science - 06.05.2016
Does food addiction affect your eating behaviour?
Researchers from the University of Liverpool have published a paper regarding their work on how beliefs about food addiction can affect eating behaviour. Obesity is often attributed to an addiction to food and many people believe themselves to be "food addicts." However, until now no studies have looked at whether believing oneself to be a food addict influences how much we eat.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 13.04.2016
Long-term phosphorus accumulation in land and water
Researchers studying three of the world's great rivers have found evidence of a legacy that could affect our planet for generations. The study of three river basins where food and water security are directly linked to phosphorus - a chemical element in fertiliser essential for food production - included the Thames River basin in the U.K., the Maumee River Basin in the mid-western section of the U.S. and the Yangtze River Basin in China.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 07.04.2016
Maternal obesity and diabetes in pregnancy result in early overgrowth of the baby in the womb
The babies of obese women who develop gestational diabetes are five times as likely to be excessively large by six months of pregnancy, according to new research led by the University of Cambridge. The study, which shows that excessive fetal growth begins weeks before at-risk women are screened for gestational diabetes, suggests that current screening programmes may take place too late during pregnancy to prevent lasting health impacts on the offspring.

Agronomy / Food Science - 06.04.2016
Banned EU pesticide affects learning of honeybees but not bumblebees
Banned EU pesticide affects learning of honeybees but not bumblebees
Banned EU pesticide affects learning of honeybees but not bumblebees Exposure to a pesticide banned by the European Union significantly affects the learning of honeybees but has no effect on bumblebees - scientists from the University of Sussex have discovered. The research is the first time scientists have looked into how both species respond to field-realistic-levels of the neonicotinoid insecticide ‘clothianidin' which was banned for use on flowering crops by the European Union in 2013.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 21.03.2016
Eating polyunsaturated fats linked to slowing diabetes progress for some
Research led by a dietitian at King's College London has found that replacing saturated fat in the diet with polyunsaturated fat, found in foods such as vegetable oils or nuts, is linked to slower progress of type 2 diabetes in people with prediabetes whose muscles do not take up glucose properly. Prediabetes is a condition in which blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be classified as type 2 diabetes.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 11.03.2016
Healthy vs unhealthy food: the challenges of understanding food choices
We know a lot about food but little about the food choices that affect the nation's health. Researchers have begun to devise experiments to find out why we choose a chocolate bar over an apple - and whether 'swaps' and 'nudges' are effective. Perceiving food as tasty is important. It's not good enough simply to tell people what is healthy if they don't think those foods are also tasty.