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Results 1 - 18 of 18.


Social Sciences - 17.06.2019
Murder of Jo Cox used by "digital prophets" to widen divides before EU vote
MP Jo Cox's murder sparked a wave of inaccurate speculation on social media which may have influenced voters before the EU Referendum, research concludes. Cardiff University's Crime and Security Research Institute analysed nearly 44,000 tweets mentioning key terms “Jo Cox” and “Brexit”, which were posted in the run up to the crucial vote.

Social Sciences - 17.06.2019
Review of Intensive Family Preservation Services
Intensive social work designed to help families in crisis is effective in preventing children from entering care, research has found. In association with its research partner the Children's Social Care Research and Development Centre (CASCADE) at Cardiff University, What Works for Children's Social Care has launched its latest report examining the evidence-base and effectiveness of Intensive Family Preservation Services (IFPS).

Social Sciences - Life Sciences - 12.06.2019
Dolphins form friendships through shared interests just like us
Dolphins form friendships through shared interests just like us
When it comes to making friends, it appears dolphins are just like us and form close friendships with other dolphins that have a common interest. The findings, published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B by an international team of researchers from the Universities of Bristol, Zurich and Western Australia, provides further insight into the social habits of these remarkable animals.

Social Sciences - 12.06.2019
Male victims of domestic abuse face significant barriers to getting help
Men who experience domestic violence and abuse face significant barriers to getting help and access to specialist support services, according to a study by researchers at the University of Bristol's Centre for Academic Primary Care and Centre for Gender and Violence Research published in BMJ Open today [Wednesday 12 June].

Social Sciences - 11.06.2019
The best marine protected areas also promote human wellbeing
Marine protected areas set up to provide the most benefit to local ecosystems also benefit human wellbeing the most, according to new research. Marine protected areas (MPAs) are regions of seas, oceans or estuaries where human activities are restricted, especially fishing. MPAs can vary across countries and regions in terms of their governance and which activities are allowed.

Social Sciences - 03.06.2019
Lack of support for vulnerable adults in police custody
Vulnerable adults in police custody face a postcode lottery on whether they are given the right support, an academic says. Dr Roxanna Dehaghani, of Cardiff University, spent six months observing procedures in police custody, which forms the basis of her book, Vulnerability in police custody: police decision-making and the appropriate adult safeguard.

Social Sciences - 03.05.2019
Personal stories of mental illness can help others on the road to recovery
Inspirational stories of how people have overcome their struggles with mental illness can help others on the road to recovery, a study by researchers at The University of Nottingham has found. However, first-hand accounts that include specific details of harmful behaviour may have a negative impact on some groups, including those battling an eating disorder.

Social Sciences - 29.04.2019
Shows older men feel ‘excluded, overlooked and cut-off’
29 April 2019 With increasing numbers of older men experiencing loneliness, a new report published today [29 APRIL] calls for a better understanding of how to tackle the growing public health challenge. A two-year study, led by the University of Bristol in collaboration with Age UK , highlights the issues faced by older men, many of whom describe feeling socially excluded, overlooked, cut-off and feeling 'left out of things' - all of which have a range of negative impacts on day-to-day life.

Social Sciences - 25.04.2019
School choice does not achieve social mix across schools
A new study has found that school choice is associated with higher levels of segregation among school children from different socioeconomic and ethnic backgrounds. Research by the University of Bristol and Cardiff University, funded by the Nuffield Foundation, shows that far from encouraging integration and equal opportunity, choice-based systems are associated with higher levels of pupil segregation; potentially leading to schools that are more homogenous in their social composition.

Social Sciences - 25.04.2019
School choice does not achieve social mix across schools
A new study has found that school choice is associated with higher levels of segregation among school children from different socioeconomic and ethnic backgrounds. Research by Cardiff University and the University of Bristol, funded by the Nuffield Foundation, shows that far from encouraging integration and equal opportunity, choice-based systems are associated with higher levels of pupil segregation; potentially leading to schools that are more homogenous in their social composition.

Social Sciences - Health - 08.04.2019
Bristol families continue to give the world unique health information
Bristol families continue to give the world unique health information
Bristol's world-renowned Children of the 90s generational health study reached a landmark this week with a first look at new mums and their children in its 2000th published paper. Children of the 90s has been collecting health data from families since the early 1990s, including for the last six years, recruiting the next generation - the Children of the Children of the 90s (COCO90s).

Social Sciences - 28.03.2019
School summer holiday experiences may be putting poorer children’s mental health at risk
The mental health and wellbeing of children from poorer families may be at greater risk in part due to less positive school summer holiday experiences, new research has revealed. The study, led by researchers from Cardiff University, is the first to examine how young peoples' experiences during the long summer holiday might explain socioeconomic differences in mental health and wellbeing upon return to school.

Social Sciences - Health - 14.03.2019
Bristol provides first long-term look at predictors of suicide attempts
Bristol provides first long-term look at predictors of suicide attempts
Academics at the University of Bristol have taken the first long-term look at potential factors that could lead to suicide attempts in high-risk young people. Published in The Lancet Psychiatry today (Thursday 14 March) researchers examined questionnaire data from 16 and 21 year olds who are part of Bristol's Children of the 90s study, concentrating on those who'd thought about suicide.

Health - Social Sciences - 11.03.2019
New evidence proves the work of UN agencies is effective
Academics led by Professor Lucie Cluver at Oxford University have shown how key services in lower and middle-income countries can contribute to multiple sustainable development goals (SDGs), even for the highest-risk children and adolescents. The study, led by Oxford University in collaboration with the universities of Cape Town and Witwatersrand, University College London and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), is the first to test the UN's concept of 'accelerators': provisions that can improve the lives of vulnerable populations in not only one SDG area, but many.

Social Sciences - Health - 08.03.2019
Domestic violence against women: giving friends and relatives the keys to help
Today [Friday 8 March] International Women's Day [IWD 2019] is celebrating the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women but worldwide, domestic violence and abuse (DVA) is still experienced by almost one in three women. It has become a major public health issue, with profound physical and mental health impact.

Social Sciences - 13.02.2019
Violent video games found not to be associated with adolescent aggression
Researchers at the Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford, have found no relationship between aggressive behaviour in teenagers and the amount of time spent playing violent video games. The study used nationally representative data from British teens and their parents alongside official E.U. and US ratings of game violence.

Social Sciences - 11.02.2019
Seven moral rules found all around the world
Anthropologists at the University of Oxford have discovered what they believe to be seven universal moral rules. The rules: help you family, help your group, return favours, be brave, defer to superiors, divide resources fairly, and respect others' property, were found in a survey of 60 cultures from all around the world.

Social Sciences - 16.01.2019
Wales imprisonment rate highest in Western Europe
Wales has the highest imprisonment rate in Western Europe, according to research by Cardiff University's Wales Governance Centre. ‘Sentencing and Immediate Custody in Wales: A Factfile', published today (Wednesday Jan 16) provides a detailed statistical comparison of sentencing and immediate custody figures in Wales and England.