News 2019

« BACK

Life Sciences



Results 1 - 11 of 11.


Health - Life Sciences - 17.01.2019
New blood tests for TB could accelerate diagnosis and save the NHS money
Rapid blood tests used by the NHS are unable to rule out tuberculosis (TB) and should be replaced with a new, more accurate test, a study has found. In the largest study to date of rapid TB tests used by the NHS, a team led by researchers at Imperial College London found that available tests are not sensitive enough to rule out a diagnosis of TB in suspected cases, and so have limited clinical use.

Life Sciences - 17.01.2019
Fruit fly promiscuity alters the evolutionary forces on males
Researchers in the Department of Zoology at Oxford University have demonstrated for the first time what effect female fruit flies having multiple partners has on sexual selection - before and after mating. Sexual selection is the branch of natural selection concerned with obtaining mates and fertility, rather than survival.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.01.2019
Brain's 'support cells' help mammals to keep time
Brain’s ’support cells’ help mammals to keep time
'Caretaker' cells which support neurons in the brain play more of an active role in circadian rhythms and animal behaviour than previously thought. Astrocytes are star-shaped nerve cells found in the brain and spinal cord that were thought to support neurons in regulating circadian rhythms - the body's internal 24-hour 'clock'.

Life Sciences - Health - 09.01.2019
Potential new way to target norovirus family
Researchers have made a significant breakthrough in understanding how a family of viruses, including the norovirus, initiate infections. The new study which includes norovirus and sapoviruses - highly infectious viruses that can cause outbreaks of diarrhoea and vomiting. It is hoped this research may provide a new target for the development of antiviral drugs to prevent diseases like norovirus.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.01.2019
Scientists call for increased diversity in genomic research
Scientists call for increased diversity in genomic research
A growing number of genomic studies have generated important discoveries regarding human health and behaviour, but new research from the University of Oxford suggests that scientific advancement is limited by a lack of diversity.  The findings show that the people studied in genetic discovery research continue to be overwhelmingly of European descent, but also for the first time reveal that subjects are concentrated in a handful of countries - the UK, US and Iceland, and have specific demographic characteristics.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.01.2019
New material could ’drive wound healing’ using the body’s inbuilt healing system
Imperial researchers have developed a new bioinspired material that interacts with surrounding tissues to promote healing. Materials are widely used to help heal wounds: Collagen sponges help treat burns and pressure sores , and scaffold-like implants are used to repair broken bones. However, the process of tissue repair changes over time, so scientists are looking to biomaterials that interact with tissues as healing takes place.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.01.2019
New materials could ’drive wound healing’ by harnessing natural healing methods
Imperial researchers have developed new bioinspired material that interacts with surrounding tissues to promote healing. Materials are widely used to help heal wounds: Collagen sponges help treat burns and pressure sores , and scaffold-like implants are used to repair broken bones. However, the process of tissue repair changes over time, so scientists are looking to biomaterials that interact with tissues as healing takes place.

Health - Life Sciences - 04.01.2019
Recurrent miscarriage linked to faulty sperm
Multiple miscarriages may be linked to the poor quality of a man's sperm, suggests new research. The early-stage study, from scientists at Imperial College London , investigated the sperm quality of 50 men whose partners had suffered three or more consecutive miscarriages.

Life Sciences - 03.01.2019
Naked mole-rats
Why do we use naked mole-rats? The naked mole-rat is a mammal with a truly bizarre appearance, looking like an elongated cocktail sausage with large, protruding teeth. Naked mole-rats live in large underground colonies of approximately 80 animals, which are dominated by a single breeding female, the queen; this social system is highly unusual in mammals but is similar to that commonly observed in bees and termites.

Environment - Life Sciences - 03.01.2019
Window into previously unseen part of glacial environment
The Greenland Ice Sheet emits tons of methane, according to a new study showing that subglacial biological activity impacts the atmosphere far more than previously thought. An international team, including researchers from Cardiff University, camped for three months next to the Greenland Ice Sheet, sampling the meltwater that runs off a large catchment (> 600 km2) of the Ice Sheet during the summer months.

Environment - Life Sciences - 02.01.2019
Melting ice sheets release tons of methane into the atmosphere
Melting ice sheets release tons of methane into the atmosphere
The Greenland Ice Sheet emits tons of methane according to a new study, showing that subglacial biological activity impacts the atmosphere far more than previously thought. An international team of researchers led by the University of Bristol camped for three months next to the Greenland Ice Sheet, sampling the meltwater that runs off a large catchment (> 600 km2) of the Ice Sheet during the summer months.