News 2019

« BACK

Life Sciences



Results 1 - 20 of 103.
1 2 3 4 5 6 Next »


Life Sciences - Health - 24.05.2019
Shows that mites and ticks are close relatives
Shows that mites and ticks are close relatives
Scientists from the University of Bristol and the Natural History Museum in London have reconstructed the evolutionary history of the chelicerates, the mega-diverse group of 110,000 arthropods that includes spiders, scorpions, mites and ticks. They found, for the first time, genomic evidence that mites and ticks do not constitute two distantly related lineages, rather they are part of the same evolutionary line.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.05.2019
Leaving school earlier could increase the risk of heart disease
Leaving school earlier could increase the risk of heart disease
Although it has been known for a long time, that education, and socioeconomic position affect health, particularly in later life, there was limited knowledge as to why. New research has found that increased levels of BMI, blood pressure and smoking partly explain why people who left school at an earlier age could be at an increased risk of heart disease.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.05.2019
More years spent in education associated with lower weight and blood pressure
Scientists have helped unravel the link between higher levels of education and reduced risk of heart attack and stroke. Previous research showed every 3.6 years spent in education can reduce a person's lifetime risk of heart disease by a third.

Physics - Life Sciences - 21.05.2019
Cells develop a 'thicker skin' under extreme gravity
Cells develop a ’thicker skin’ under extreme gravity
A high-gravity experiment has revealed how cells keep their shape under pressure. Scientists have probed how cells respond to high gravity with a technique that could transform how we look at cellular life. Using the European Space Agency's (ESA) Large Diameter Centrifuge in the Netherlands, Imperial and ESA researchers spun cells at high speeds that simulate a gravitational force 15 times stronger than on Earth (15g).

Life Sciences - Health - 21.05.2019
Head injury effects halted by xenon gas, finds first ever lifelong study in mice
Head injury effects halted by xenon gas, finds first ever lifelong study in mice
Following traumatic brain injury (TBI), xenon prevented early death, improved long-term cognition, and protected brain tissue in mice in a new study. TBI is the leading cause of death and disability in people under 45 in developed countries. The primary injury, caused by the initial force from a fall or car accident for example, is followed by a secondary injury which develops in the minutes, hours and days afterwards.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 20.05.2019
New method simplifies the search for protein receptor complexes, speeding drug development
For a drug to intervene in cells or entire organs that are not behaving normally, it must first bind to specific protein receptors in the cell membranes. Receptors can change their molecular structure in a multitude of ways during binding - and only the right structure will “unlock” the drug's therapeutic effect.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.05.2019
Cancer drug could be repurposed to provide treatment for brain aneurysms
Cancer drug could be repurposed to provide treatment for brain aneurysms
Cancer drug could be repurposed to provide treatment for brain aneurysms, new research suggests An important class of drug used to treat cancer patients could be used to treat brain aneurysms, according to new research published this week. Brain aneurysms are a bulge in a blood vessel caused by a weakness in the blood vessel wall.

Life Sciences - 17.05.2019
Bedbugs evolved more than 100 million years ago - and walked the earth with T.Rex
Bedbugs evolved more than 100 million years ago - and walked the earth with T.Rex
International research finds bedbugs evolved more than 100 million years ago - and walked the earth with T.Rex Bedbugs - some of the most unwanted human bedfellows - have been parasitic companions with other species asides from humans for more than 100 million years, walking the earth at the same time as dinosaurs.

Health - Life Sciences - 16.05.2019
Cooling baby treatment one of ‘Nation's Lifesavers'
Cooling baby treatment one of ‘Nation’s Lifesavers’
A University of Bristol researcher who discovered that cooling babies who have suffered a lack of oxygen at birth improves their survival without brain damage in later childhood, is named by Universities UK as one of the 'Nation's Lifesavers'. One in 1,000 babies born at full term in the UK suffer brain injury as a result of being severely deprived of oxygen.

Life Sciences - 10.05.2019
Dietary fats entering the brain may explain link between obesity and depression
Obesity and depression have long been linked, with previous clinical studies finding an association between these two conditions. However, until now, the mechanisms of how obesity affects depression and vice versa have not been fully understood. Now, in a new study led by the University of Glasgow in collaboration with the Gladstone Institutes, and published today in Translational Psychiatry , scientists have been able to demonstrate the links between the consumption of diets high in saturated fats that lead to obesity and the development of depression phenotypes.

Environment - Life Sciences - 09.05.2019
Birds outside their comfort zone are more vulnerable to deforestation
Birds outside their comfort zone are more vulnerable to deforestation
Members of the same bird species can have dramatically different responses to deforestation depending on where they live, finds a new study. Predicting a species' sensitivity to environmental changes, such as deforestation or climate change, is crucial for designing conservation strategies. These predictions are often based on a species' physical traits, and assume that all members of a species will respond the same.

Life Sciences - Innovation / Technology - 09.05.2019
Global Alliance of Biofoundries is major step forward in synthetic biology
Global Alliance of Biofoundries is major step forward in synthetic biology
A new network of the world's leading Biofoundries has been launched to drive forward synthetic biology research and industry. The Global Alliance of Biofoundries (GBA) brings together 16 institutions from countries including the UK, US, Japan, Singapore, China, Australia, Denmark and Canada. The London DNA Foundry , based at Imperial College London, is one of the leading founders of the new Global Alliance.

Life Sciences - Health - 08.05.2019
Stress in early life could make people more likely to develop depression
New research by the University of Bristol has found that early life adversity could make an individual more at risk of developing negative thinking, which could lead to major depressive disorder (MDD). The findings provide biological and psychological evidence to support work first proposed in the 1960s.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.05.2019
New film of immune system killing bacteria could point to new therapies
New film of immune system killing bacteria could point to new therapies
New film showing how our immune system attacks bacteria may guide the development of new therapies that harness the immune system against infections. To kill bacteria in the blood, our immune system opens deadly ‘bullet holes' in their membranes, causing them to burst and die. The holes are created by structures called membrane attack complexes (MACs).

Life Sciences - Health - 03.05.2019
Genetic conditions lead to range of overlapping needs in children
Deletions and duplications of DNA are responsible for wide-ranging developmental difficulties in children, finds a new study by Cardiff University.

Life Sciences - Environment - 02.05.2019
Sussex mathematician's breakthrough on non-toxic pest control which doesn't harm bees
Sussex mathematician’s breakthrough on non-toxic pest control which doesn’t harm bees
Breakthrough ‘gene silencing' technique uses naturally occurring soil bacteria to kill specific crop-destroying pests without harming other insects or the environment Non-toxic pest control could help feed growing global population, boost organic food production and drive bio-fuel production Experiments show up to 92% more crops survive with this approach compared to no pest control A University of Sussex mathematician, Dr Konstantin Blyus

Life Sciences - 02.05.2019
Scientists explore the evolution of animal homosexuality
Scientists explore the evolution of animal homosexuality
Researchers are using a new approach to understand why same-sex behaviour is so common across the animal kingdom. In 1910, a team of scientists set off on the Terra Nova Expedition to explore Antarctica. Among them was George Murray Levick, a zoologist and photographer who would be the first researcher to study the world's largest Adélie penguin colony.

Life Sciences - Health - 01.05.2019
How both mother and baby genes affect birth weight
The largest study of its kind, which has used genetic information from Bristol's Children of the 90s, has led to new insights into the complex relationships surrounding how mothers' and babies' genes influence birth weight. The research, published , identifies 190 links between our genetic code and birth weight, two-thirds of which are identified for the first time.

Life Sciences - 01.05.2019
The hunger gaps: how flowering times affect farmland bees
The hunger gaps: how flowering times affect farmland bees
For the very first time, researchers from the University of Bristol have measured farmland nectar supplies throughout the whole year and revealed hungry gaps when food supply is not meeting pollinator demand. This novel finding reveals new ways of making farmland better for pollinators, benefitting the many crop plants and wildflowers that depend on them.

Life Sciences - 30.04.2019
Screening for rare but important disease ’biomarkers’ gets an accuracy boost
Researchers have created a system that can detect and quantify small and rare biological molecules that are important for detecting disease early. Certain molecules in biological fluids like blood and urine can be indicators of disease, especially if they become more prevalent. However, in the early stages of disease these ‘biomarkers' are rare and can be difficult to detect.
1 2 3 4 5 6 Next »