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Results 1 - 20 of 22.


Health - 18.01.2019
To investigate a common Caesarean birth complication
Obstetricians, midwives and women who've had babies by Caesarean section are taking part in a new study to find out which technique is best used by the surgeon if the baby's head is found to be stuck in the pelvis at the time of Caesarean delivery. Around 15% of babies are delivered by emergency C-section in the UK and the problem of ‘impacted fetal head' occurs in about 1.5% of these operations - that's around 1,500 babies who have to be manoeuvred very carefully to release their head from the pelvis.

Health - 17.01.2019
One quarter of prisoners have suffered traumatic brain injury
A quarter of all Scottish prisoners have been hospitalised with a traumatic brain injury at some point in their lives, according to new research. ‌ The study, led by the University of Glasgow in collaboration with the Scottish Prison Service and published today in PLOS ONE, also estimates that 10% of prisoners have suffered a severe head injury in their lives, or multiple head injuries that are likely to lead to a persistent disability.

Health - Pharmacology - 17.01.2019
Finds elevated levels of stress hormone linked to housing type and tenure
A new study examining UK housing data and health outcomes has indicated a link between people living in the private rental sector having higher levels of a stress hormone. The findings, led by researchers at the Universities of Bristol and Essex, are published in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.01.2019
New blood tests for TB could accelerate diagnosis and save the NHS money
Rapid blood tests used by the NHS are unable to rule out tuberculosis (TB) and should be replaced with a new, more accurate test, a study has found. In the largest study to date of rapid TB tests used by the NHS, a team led by researchers at Imperial College London found that available tests are not sensitive enough to rule out a diagnosis of TB in suspected cases, and so have limited clinical use.

Health - 15.01.2019
Medical detection dogs help diabetes patients regulate insulin levels
Medical detection dogs help diabetes patients regulate insulin levels
New research by the University of Bristol in collaboration with Medical Detection Dogs has found that the best trained alert dogs have the potential to vastly improve the quality of life of people living with Type 1 diabetes. As reported in PLOS One , on average trained dogs alerted their owners to 83 per cent of hypoglycaemic episodes in over 4,000 hypoand hyper-glycaemic episodes that were examined.

Pharmacology - Health - 15.01.2019
Elephantiasis and river blindness could be eliminated faster with new molecule
A new potential drug molecule could reduce treatment times for two widespread diseases from weeks to days, ultimately helping to eliminate them. The new molecule has been designed to more effectively target and kill the cause of elephantiasis and river blindness while having potentially fewer side effects.

Health - 14.01.2019
Ers develop comprehensive new way to predict breast cancer risk
Ers develop comprehensive new way to predict breast cancer risk
Scientists have created the most comprehensive method yet to predict a woman's risk of breast cancer, according to a study led by researchers at the University of Cambridge. The study, funded by Cancer Research, is published today in Genetics in Medicine.

Health - 14.01.2019
Recalling happy memories during adolescence can reduce risk of depression
Recalling happy memories during adolescence can reduce risk of depression
Recalling positive events and experiences can help protect young people†against depression in later life, suggests new research published today. Our work suggests that 'remembering the good times' may help build resilience to stress and reduce vulnerability to depression in young people Adrian Dahl Askelund Depression is now the leading cause of disability worldwide, affecting more than 300 million people.

Pharmacology - Health - 14.01.2019
University launches first-of-its-kind equipment to transform imaging of cells, tissues and materials
The University of Nottingham is the first university in the world to own and operate unique equipment which allows label-free chemical imaging of materials, cells and tissues, with the potential to transform research in these areas. The new 3DOrbiSIMS is the first production instrument of its kind and will have applications in a multi-disciplinary range of research areas, including biomedical implants, drug delivery systems, developing strategies to tackle antimicrobial resistance, organic electronic devices and engineering applications.

Pharmacology - Health - 14.01.2019
New report reveals stark north south divide in painkiller prescribing
A new report has revealed that patients in the north of the country are being prescribed almost four times more opioids to relieve pain than those in the south. The research by the University of Nottingham's School of Pharmacy and the University of Manchester is the first national study to examine the regional variations in opioid prescribing and how this links with socioeconomic status.

Pharmacology - Health - 11.01.2019
Discreet contraception for world’s poorest countries
Innovative microneedle technology is being developed as an effective, pain-free and discreet method of delivering contraception across the world's poorest countries, thanks to a new research consortium led by Cardiff University and supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The project will focus on pre-clinical work to develop microneedle patches that have the potential to be painlessly and inconspicuously administered by the user themselves within a few seconds and can last for up to six months.

Psychology - Health - 11.01.2019
Autistic people urgently need access to tailored mental health support
New research has revealed that people diagnosed with autism don't have access to effective mental health support, putting them at risk of self-harm and suicide. Researchers from the University of Nottingham, Coventry University and the University of Cambridge worked with a steering group of Autistic adults to design and carry out the research which has recenlty been published in the journal Autism.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.01.2019
Brain's 'support cells' help mammals to keep time
Brain’s ’support cells’ help mammals to keep time
'Caretaker' cells which support neurons in the brain play more of an active role in circadian rhythms and animal behaviour than previously thought. Astrocytes are star-shaped nerve cells found in the brain and spinal cord that were thought to support neurons in regulating circadian rhythms - the body's internal 24-hour 'clock'.

Health - Pharmacology - 09.01.2019
HRT tablets increase risk of blood clots in women
Women who use certain types of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) are at a higher risk of developing potentially life-threatening blood clots, new research has confirmed. The study, undertaken by researchers at The University of Nottingham and published in the BMJ , found that the risk of developing blood clots was only increased for women using HRT in tablet form and was slightly higher for higher dosages.

Life Sciences - Health - 09.01.2019
Potential new way to target norovirus family
Researchers have made a significant breakthrough in understanding how a family of viruses, including the norovirus, initiate infections. The new study which includes norovirus and sapoviruses - highly infectious viruses that can cause outbreaks of diarrhoea and vomiting. It is hoped this research may provide a new target for the development of antiviral drugs to prevent diseases like norovirus.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.01.2019
Scientists call for increased diversity in genomic research
Scientists call for increased diversity in genomic research
A growing number of genomic studies have generated important discoveries regarding human health and behaviour, but new research from the University of Oxford suggests that scientific advancement is limited by a lack of diversity.† The findings show that the people studied in genetic discovery research continue to be overwhelmingly of European descent, but also for the first time reveal that subjects are concentrated in a handful of countries - the UK, US and Iceland, and have specific demographic characteristics.

Health - 07.01.2019
Recent report places Glasgow as UK lead in pancreatic cancer research
A recent report has revealed that half of the top dozen UK pancreatic cancer researchers are based in Glasgow, with all six being affiliated with the University of Glasgow. The analysis, from the expertscape.com, confirms Glasgow's position as a leading centre of excellence for pancreatic cancer.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.01.2019
New material could ’drive wound healing’ using the body’s inbuilt healing system
Imperial researchers have developed a new bioinspired material that interacts with surrounding tissues to promote healing. Materials are widely used to help heal wounds: Collagen sponges help treat burns and pressure sores , and scaffold-like implants are used to repair broken bones. However, the process of tissue repair changes over time, so scientists are looking to biomaterials that interact with tissues as healing takes place.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.01.2019
New materials could ’drive wound healing’ by harnessing natural healing methods
Imperial researchers have developed new bioinspired material that interacts with surrounding tissues to promote healing. Materials are widely used to help heal wounds: Collagen sponges help treat burns and pressure sores , and scaffold-like implants are used to repair broken bones. However, the process of tissue repair changes over time, so scientists are looking to biomaterials that interact with tissues as healing takes place.

Health - Pharmacology - 07.01.2019
Automated phone calls may help patients to take medicines as prescribed, pilot study suggests
Automated phone calls may help patients to take medicines as prescribed, pilot study suggests
Remembering to take medication is vital for managing long term health conditions such as high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, or multiple conditions. Latest research from the University of Cambridge suggests that using interactive voice response (IVR) technology supports patients to take their medicine as prescribed.