News 2019

« BACK

Health



Results 1 - 20 of 184.
1 2 3 4 5 10 Next »


Health - Life Sciences - 17.07.2019
Higher iron levels may boost heart health - but also increase risk of stroke
Scientists have helped unravel the protective ' and potentially harmful ' effect of iron in the body. In a series of early-stage studies examining genetic data from over 500,000 people, a team of international scientists, led by Imperial College London, explored the role that iron plays in over 900 diseases.

Pharmacology - Health - 15.07.2019
Science of microdosing psychedelics ’remains patchy and anecdotal’, says review
The practice of taking small, regular doses of psychedelic drugs to enhance mood, creativity, or productivity lacks robust scientific evidence. The process, called microdosing, has been lauded by some, with high profile proponents in Silicon Valley. But to date, scientific evidence to support or even fully explore claims of the benefits and safety, has been lacking.

Pharmacology - Health - 11.07.2019
Reducing antibiotic use
Reducing antibiotic use
A simple finger-prick blood test could help prevent unnecessary prescribing of antibiotics for people with the lung condition chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to a new study by researchers from Cardiff University, University of Oxford and King's College London. The team demonstrated that using a CRP finger-prick blood test resulted in 20% fewer people using antibiotics for COPD flare-ups.

Pharmacology - Health - 10.07.2019
Patients with mental health conditions denied access to ’best available’ stop smoking treatments
A new study from researchers at the universities of Bristol and Bath suggests that doctors should rethink which drugs they prescribe to help smokers with mental health conditions kick the habit. Their results highlight that the most effective drug at helping individuals to stop smoking is less likely to be prescribed to people with mental health conditions.

Health - 08.07.2019
Children from deprived areas six times more exposed to tobacco retail
Children from the most income deprived areas experienced similar exposure to tobacco retailing in one day as children from the least deprived areas experienced in one week. This was the finding of new collaborative research between the Universities of Glasgow and Edinburgh, which was published today in the journal Tobacco Control .The researchers used GPS-trackers to follow a group of almost 700 10-and-11-year-olds from across Scotland.

Pharmacology - Health - 04.07.2019
Aims to improve acne in women
A new study is looking for women with acne in Bristol to take part in a new clinical trial. Led by researchers at the Universities of Bristol and Southampton the study will investigate whether a drug called spironolactone can help improve acne in women. Spironolactone is usually given to people for high blood pressure.

Health - Life Sciences - 03.07.2019
Genes could play a role in tooth decay and gum disease
Tooth decay and gum disease impact on illness and healthcare spending, yet the role of genetics in dental problems is largely unknown. New research led by an international team, including researchers at the University of Bristol, suggests hereditary traits and factors such as obesity, education and personality could play a role in tooth decay and gum disease.

Health - Life Sciences - 03.07.2019
Scientists hijack bacteria's homing ability
Scientists hijack bacteria’s homing ability
In a world first, scientists have found a new way to direct stem cells to heart tissue. The findings, led by researchers at the University of Bristol and published in Chemical Science, could radically improve the treatment for cardiovascular disease, which causes more than a quarter of all deaths in the UK (1).

Health - Pharmacology - 03.07.2019
Smartphone network helps uncover hundreds of anti-cancer molecules in our food
Smartphone network helps uncover hundreds of anti-cancer molecules in our food
A crowdsourcing project which uses thousands of idling smartphones has helped to uncover anti-cancer properties of everyday foods and medicines. The project, led by researchers at Imperial College London, uses artificial intelligence to crunch huge volumes of data on a ‘cloud computing' network of smartphones while they charge overnight.

Health - Innovation / Technology - 02.07.2019
NHS must take urgent steps to defend against hackers, says White Paper
NHS must take urgent steps to defend against hackers, says White Paper
The NHS remains vulnerable to cyber-attack, and must take urgent steps to defend against threats which could risk the safety of patients. This is the finding of a new White Paper on NHS Cyber Security presented at the House of Lords. For the safety of patients, it is critical to ensure that the data, devices and systems that uphold our NHS and therefore our nation's health are secure.

Health - Pharmacology - 01.07.2019
Heart attack patients with diabetes may benefit from cholesterol-lowering drug
Injections of a cholesterol-cutting drug could reduce the risk of heart attack or stroke in patients with diabetes who have had a recent heart attack. Regular injections of a cholesterol-cutting drug could reduce the risk of heart attack or stroke in patients with diabetes and who have had a recent heart attack.

Health - Physics - 28.06.2019
Mini 'magic' MRI scanner could diagnose knee injuries more accurately
Mini ’magic’ MRI scanner could diagnose knee injuries more accurately
Researchers at Imperial College London have developed a prototype mini MRI scanner that fits around a patient's leg. The team say the device - which uses so-called ‘magic angle' effect - could potentially help diagnose knee injuries more quickly, and more accurately. Knee injuries affect millions of people - and MRI scans are crucial to diagnosing the problem Dr Karyn Chappell Study author In a proof-of-concept study using animal knees, the results suggest the technology could be used to show all the structures of the knee.

Health - 26.06.2019
Boosting the cancer-destroying ability of killer T-cells
More types of cancer could potentially be destroyed by patients' own immune cells, thanks to new research by Cardiff University. The team of researchers discovered that increasing the amount of the molecule L-selectin on T-cells can vastly improve their ability to fight solid tumours. Professor Ann Ager, from Cardiff University's Systems Immunity Research Institute, said: “These results mean that immunotherapy could be used to fight most cancers.

Health - Environment - 21.06.2019
No conclusive links to health effects from waste incinerators
No conclusive links to health effects from waste incinerators
Researchers have found no link between exposure to emissions from municipal waste incinerators (MWIs) and infant deaths or reduced foetal growth. However, they show living closer to the incinerators themselves is associated with a very small increase in the risk of some birth defects, compared to the general population.

Health - Physics - 20.06.2019
Researchers harness AI to combat colon cancer
Researchers harness AI to combat colon cancer
Engineers have shown that it is technically possible to use an AI system to guide a tiny robotic capsule inside the colon to take microultrasound images. Known as a ‘Sonopill', the device could spell the end for painful endoscopic examinations for patients, where a semi-rigid scope is passed into the bowel.

Health - 18.06.2019
GPs should not use inflammatory marker tests to rule out serious conditions
Blood tests that detect inflammation, known as inflammatory marker tests, are not sensitive enough to rule out serious underlying conditions and GPs should not use them for this purpose, according to researchers from the University of Bristol's Centre for Academic Primary Care, University of Exeter and the National Institute for Health Research Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care West (NIHR CLAHRC West).

Health - 13.06.2019
People with mobility issues set to benefit from wearable devices
People with mobility issues set to benefit from wearable devices
The lives of thousands of people with mobility issues could be transformed thanks to ground-breaking research by scientists at the University of Bristol. The FREEHAB project will develop soft, wearable rehabilitative devices with a view to helping elderly and disabled people walk and move from sitting to a standing position in comfort and safety.

Health - 13.06.2019
Chronic diseases monitored in primary care could lead to unnecessary testing
Guidelines used by GPs to monitor chronic diseases are based on expert opinion rather than evidence, according to a review of the guidelines by National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) researchers at the University of Bristol. The review, published today [Thursday 13 June] in the British Medical Journal, looked at guidelines for chronic kidney disease, high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes, which are monitored through a range of tests in GP surgeries.

Health - 11.06.2019
Being a dad is under the spotlight at the University of Bristol
Researchers at the University of Bristol are about to delve deeper into the relationship between dads and their new baby. It's all part of an initiative funded by the Wellcome Trust to know more about the role of fathers in child development, including families where the mother has experienced mental health difficulties.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.06.2019
Doctors question use of saline fluids to treat critically ill children
Doctors question use of saline fluids to treat critically ill children
Doctors have urged hospitals around the world to reconsider the type of fluids used to treat children gravely ill with sepsis. In a new study , researchers from Imperial College London found saline fluids commonly used to help stabilise critically ill children may trigger the blood to become more acidic, and lead to organ failure.
1 2 3 4 5 10 Next »