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Environment - 10.07.2019
Best male biathletes 'more attractive'
Best male biathletes ’more attractive’
Top male biathletes are more attractive to the opposite sex, according to a new study by scientists at the universities of Exeter and Bristol. This result, say the team, fits with the theory that women have an evolved preference for more athletic men, who in past times were better able to provide for their families.

Innovation / Technology - Environment - 09.07.2019
Making sense of science
A University of Sussex professor has helped draw up new guidance to aid European policymakers in making better informed decisions on issues of complex scientific evidence. Professor Andy Stirling has contributed to the new report Making Sense of Science by Science Advice for Policy by European Advisors (SAPEA) which brings together outstanding expertise in engineering, humanities, medicine, natural and social sciences from over 100 academies, young academies and learned societies across Europe.

Environment - 08.07.2019
Cave droplets provide window into past climates
The chemistry of drip waters that form stalagmites and stalactites in caves around the world have given researchers an insight into our past climate. In the first ever global analysis of cave drip water, an international team, led by Andy Baker at UNSW Australia and including scientists from Cardiff University, have explored how stalagmites and stalactites can show how groundwater resources have recharged in the past.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 25.06.2019
Shows how melting ice is affecting supplies of nutrients to the sea
The findings of a research expedition to coastal Greenland which examined, for the first time, how melting ice is affecting supplies of nutrients to the oceans has been published in the journal Progress in Oceanography. The European Research Council-funded expedition on board the RSS Discovery took place during the summer of 2017.

Environment - 24.06.2019
Clouds dominate uncertainties in predicting future Greenland melt
Clouds dominate uncertainties in predicting future Greenland melt
New research led by climate scientists from the University of Bristol suggests that the representation of clouds in climate models is as, or more, important than the amount of greenhouse gas emissions when it comes to projecting future Greenland ice sheet melt. Recent research shows that the whole of the Greenland ice sheet could be gone within the next thousand years, raising global sea level by more than seven metres.

Environment - Social Sciences - 24.06.2019
Ancient intervention could boost dwindling water reserves in coastal Peru
Ancient intervention could boost dwindling water reserves in coastal Peru
Methods from 1,400 years ago could boost water availability during Lima's dry season, according to new Imperial College London research. Nestled between the Pacific Ocean and the Andes mountains , the people of Peru 's coastal region rely on surface water from the Andes for drinking water, industry, and animal and crop farming.

Health - Environment - 21.06.2019
No conclusive links to health effects from waste incinerators
No conclusive links to health effects from waste incinerators
Researchers have found no link between exposure to emissions from municipal waste incinerators (MWIs) and infant deaths or reduced foetal growth. However, they show living closer to the incinerators themselves is associated with a very small increase in the risk of some birth defects, compared to the general population.

Environment - 05.06.2019
Adjusting carbon emissions to the Paris climate commitments would prevent thousands of heat-related deaths
Thousands of annual heat-related deaths could be potentially avoided in major US cities if global temperatures are limited to the Paris Climate Goals compared with current climate commitments, a new study led by the University of Bristol has found. The research, published today in the journal Science Advances , is highly relevant to decisions about strengthening national climate actions in 2020, when the next round of climate pledges is due in 2020.

Environment - Innovation / Technology - 05.06.2019
Food freshness sensors could replace 'use-by' dates to cut food waste
Food freshness sensors could replace ’use-by’ dates to cut food waste
Imperial academics have developed low-cost, smartphone-linked, eco-friendly spoilage sensors for meat and fish packaging. These sensors are cheap enough that we hope supermarkets could use them within three years. Dr Firat Güder Department of Bioengineering The researchers say the new sensors could help detect spoilage and reduce food waste for supermarkets and consumers.

Environment - 03.06.2019
Pollution control of rivers can reduce impact of climate warming
Improvements in water quality could reduce the ecological impact of climate change on rivers, finds a new study by Cardiff University's Water Research Institute and the University of Vermont. Warm water can affect freshwater organisms in similar ways to many pollutants: both reduce the availability of oxygen in the water.

Environment - Life Sciences - 30.05.2019
Researchers identify how to find best and worse colours for camouflage
Researchers identify how to find best and worse colours for camouflage
Avoiding detection can provide significant survival advantages for prey, predators, or the military. For the first time, scientists from Bristol's Camo Lab have identified a new method to find the optimal colour to minimize or maximize detectability of a target. The study is published in a Royal Society Interface study.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 22.05.2019
Source of new CFC emissions
Source of new CFC emissions
Since 2013, annual emissions of a banned chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) have increased by around 7 Australia and Switzerland. Last year, it was reported that emissions of one of the most important ozone depleting substances, CFC-11, had increased. This chemical was used primarily as a foaming agent for building insulation, refrigerators and other consumer products.

Innovation / Technology - Environment - 20.05.2019
Expert judgement provides better understanding of the effect of melting ice sheets
Expert judgement provides better understanding of the effect of melting ice sheets
Melting ice sheets in Greenland and the Antarctic, and subsequent sea level rise (SLR) this will cause, is widely recognised as posing a significant threat to coastal communities and ecosystems. Strategies and measures to mitigate and plan for the potential impacts are reliant on scientific projections of future SLR - conventionally provided using numerical modelling.

Environment - Life Sciences - 09.05.2019
Birds outside their comfort zone are more vulnerable to deforestation
Birds outside their comfort zone are more vulnerable to deforestation
Members of the same bird species can have dramatically different responses to deforestation depending on where they live, finds a new study. Predicting a species' sensitivity to environmental changes, such as deforestation or climate change, is crucial for designing conservation strategies. These predictions are often based on a species' physical traits, and assume that all members of a species will respond the same.

Environment - 06.05.2019
Rethinking digital service design could reduce their environmental impact
Rethinking digital service design could reduce their environmental impact
Digital technology companies could reduce the carbon footprint of services like You Tube by changing how they are designed, experts say. Human-Computer Interaction researchers from the University of Bristol looked at how much electric energy was used to provide YouTube videos to people globally in 2016, to enable them to estimate the service's carbon footprint in that year.

Life Sciences - Environment - 02.05.2019
Sussex mathematician's breakthrough on non-toxic pest control which doesn't harm bees
Sussex mathematician’s breakthrough on non-toxic pest control which doesn’t harm bees
Breakthrough ‘gene silencing' technique uses naturally occurring soil bacteria to kill specific crop-destroying pests without harming other insects or the environment Non-toxic pest control could help feed growing global population, boost organic food production and drive bio-fuel production Experiments show up to 92% more crops survive with this approach compared to no pest control A University of Sussex mathematician, Dr Konstantin Blyus

Life Sciences - Environment - 30.04.2019
Pesticide exposure causes bumblebee flight to fall short
Pesticide exposure causes bumblebee flight to fall short
Bees exposed to a neonicotinoid pesticide fly only a third of the distance that unexposed bees are able to achieve. Flight behaviour is crucial for determining how bees forage, so reduced flight performance from pesticide exposure could lead to colonies going hungry and pollination services being impacted.

Business / Economics - Environment - 12.04.2019
No more Hoover dams: Hydropowered countries suffer higher levels of poverty, corruption and debt
No more Hoover dams: Hydropowered countries suffer higher levels of poverty, corruption and debt
Countries relying on the world's biggest and most established source of renewable electricity have seen their poverty, corruption and debt levels rise and their economy slow at significantly greater rates than nations which use other energy resources over the last three decades, a major new study has found.

Environment - Palaeontology - 08.04.2019
Earth's recovery from mass extinction could take millions of years
Earth’s recovery from mass extinction could take millions of years
How long will it take our biosphere to recover from the current climate crisis' It's a question that makes for a sobering examination of Earth's ongoing destruction. It's to the past, specifically the fossils of a tiny species that went out with the dinosaurs, that scientists have turned for the answer.

Environment - Music - 05.04.2019
Music consumption has unintended economic and environmental costs
Music consumption has unintended economic and environmental costs, according to new research published today (Monday 8 April 2019) in the run-up to worldwide Record Store Day. The price consumers have been willing to pay for listening to recorded music has never been lower, while the environmental impact of listening to music has never been higher, researchers have found.
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