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Astronomy/Space Science



Results 1 - 15 of 15.


Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 03.05.2019
Have scientists observed a black hole swallowing a neutron star?
Have scientists observed a black hole swallowing a neutron star?
Within weeks of switching their machines back on to scour the sky for more sources of gravitational waves, scientists are poring over data in an attempt to further understand an unprecedented cosmic event. Astronomers working at the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and the European-based Virgo detector have reported the possible detection of gravitational waves emanating from the collision of a neutron star and a black hole.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 02.05.2019
UofG astrophysicists investigate two new neutron star collisions
Astrophysicists at the University of Glasgow are celebrating the detection of gravitational wave signals likely to be caused by the crashing of two neutron stars and what could be the first evidence of the collision of a neutron star and a black hole. The University of Glasgow researchers are key partners in the international scientific collaboration which made the new detections - the National Science Foundation's Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO), based in the United States, and Virgo, based in Italy.

Astronomy / Space Science - 18.04.2019
New satellite data sets reveal flood risk for vulnerable populations
Scientists from the University of Bristol have modelled the likelihood of flooding in some of the world's most hazardous zones to an unparalleled degree of accuracy. Their insights could help people and governments better protect themselves against risk and flood losses. As reported today (Thursday 18 April), experts in flood risk and environmental uncertainty analysed detailed hazard maps of 18 countries across Latin America, Asia and Africa against data developed by Facebook's Connectivity Labs detailing population density in those countries.

Astronomy / Space Science - 02.04.2019
Why elite cyclists should talk to astronauts
It is well known that the bones of astronauts can become weak from being in space. But did you know that elite cyclists can lose a similar amount of bone density during a racing season? A new study by our sports science experts has found that something called Relative Energy Deficiency in Sports (RED-S) is the main culprit.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 26.03.2019
Detectors set to resume hunt for gravitational waves
University of Glasgow astrophysicists are gearing up to resume the search for gravitational waves, the ripples in spacetime caused by some of the universe's most spectacular events. The Glasgow researchers played key roles in the development of the National Science Foundation's Advanced LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory) project, based in the United States, which will be starting a new science run on Monday April 1 along with the Virgo gravitational detector, based in Italy.

Astronomy / Space Science - 08.03.2019
Translating space know-how to ’sniff’ out salad quality
Researchers at Cardiff University are developing new technology which will be able to ‘smell' when fruit or vegetables are going off - potentially saving tonnes of waste. According to the UK waste advisory body WRAP, 1,200,000 tonnes of fresh fruit and vegetables are needlessly wasted each year.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 20.02.2019
Cosmic dust forms in supernovae blasts
Scientists claim to have solved a longstanding mystery as to how cosmic dust, the building blocks of stars and planets, forms across the Universe. Cosmic dust contains tiny fragments or organic material and is spread out across the Universe. The dust is primarily formed in stars and is then blown off in a slow wind or a massive star explosion.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 19.02.2019
Seeing the unseeable
Seeing the unseeable
Scientists have achieved what once seemed impossible, providing the first ever image of a black hole. The landmark discovery announced today by an international team, including academics from Cardiff University, reveals how a collection of telescopes from around the globe - together known as the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) - have made it possible to “see the unseeable.” The image reveals a black hole at the centre of Messier 87, a massive galaxy in the nearby Virgo galaxy cluster.

Astronomy / Space Science - 19.02.2019
Astronomers detect hundreds of thousands of previously unknown galaxies
Astronomers detect hundreds of thousands of previously unknown galaxies
A major new radio sky survey has revealed hundreds of thousands of previously undetected galaxies, shedding new light on many research areas including the physics of black holes and how clusters of galaxies evolve. An international team of more than 200 astronomers from 18 countries, including researchers from the University of Oxford, has published the first phase of the survey at unprecedented sensitivity using the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) telescope.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 04.02.2019
Giant impacts caused by interplanetary collisions
Giant impacts caused by interplanetary collisions
Astronomers have found fresh evidence for significant planetary diversity within a single exoplanet system, suggesting that giant high-speed collisions are partly responsible for planetary evolution. An international team of scientists led by Italy's National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF) and involving physicists from the University of Bristol spent three years observing the exoplanetary system Kepler-107 via the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo in La Palma.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 31.01.2019
Knighthood for groundbreaking UofG astrophysicist
A pioneering University of Glasgow researcher who helped deliver the historic first detection of gravitational waves has received a knighthood in recognition of his contribution to physics and astronomy. James Hough, Research Professor in Natural Philosophy in the School of Physics and Astronomy, was made a Knight Bachelor of the British Empire by the Duke of Cambridgeduring a ceremony at Buckingham Palace today (Thursday 31 January).

Astronomy / Space Science - 28.01.2019
Black holes shed light on expanding Universe
Black holes shed light on expanding Universe
Scientists are using supermassive black holes to measure the expansion of the early Universe. The researchers, including our astronomers here at Durham University, think that their measurements show the Universe might be growing more rapidly than previously thought. Supermassive black holes give off radiation as they feed and are some of the brightest points of light in space.

Astronomy / Space Science - 21.01.2019
Mystery orbits in outermost reaches of solar system not caused by 'Planet Nine', say researchers
Mystery orbits in outermost reaches of solar system not caused by ’Planet Nine’, say researchers
The strange orbits of some objects in the farthest reaches of our solar system, hypothesised by some astronomers to be shaped by an unknown ninth planet, can instead be explained by the combined gravitational force of small objects orbiting the Sun beyond Neptune, say researchers.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 03.01.2019
Groovy young rock stars and the Holy Grail
Will a telescopic Census of thousands of planets help to pinpoint a new Earth? For Professor Jane Greaves, such a discovery will be the ‘Holy Grail' - the culmination of a career spent observing planets forming around young stars. At the heart of the study, interpreting data on raw material ‘remnants' from comet collisions around stars like the Sun will be the key to success.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 01.01.2019
Martian drill set for Antarctic climate mission
A drill originally developed to break through Martian rocks is set to be deployed to Antarctica on a mission which could help us understand the history of Earth's changing climate. A team of University of Glasgow engineers are heading to a British Antarctic Survey (BAS) research station named Skytrain Ice Rise on Thursday 3 January with a sophisticated drill they originally developed for use on future unmanned Martian rover missions.