News 2019


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Results 81 - 100 of 386.


Earth Sciences - Palaeontology - 02.05.2019
Chewing versus sex in the duck-billed dinosaurs
Chewing versus sex in the duck-billed dinosaurs
The duck-billed hadrosaurs walked the Earth over 90-million years ago and were one of the most successful groups of dinosaurs. But why were these 2-3 tonne giants so successful? A new study, published in Paleobiology, shows that their special adaptations in teeth and jaws and in their head crests were crucial, and provides new insights into how these innovations evolved.

Electroengineering - 02.05.2019
New material to pave the way for more efficient electronic devices
New material to pave the way for more efficient electronic devices
Researchers at the University of Bristol have successfully demonstrated the high thermal conductivity of a new material, paving the way for safer and more efficient electronic devices - including mobile phones, radars and even electric cars. The team, led by Professor Martin Kuball at the Center for Device Thermography and Reliability (CDTR) [MK1] , found that by making an ultra-pure version of Boron Nitride it was possible to demonstrate its thermal conductivity potential for the first time, which at 550W/mk is twice that of copper.

Life Sciences - Environment - 02.05.2019
Sussex mathematician's breakthrough on non-toxic pest control which doesn't harm bees
Sussex mathematician’s breakthrough on non-toxic pest control which doesn’t harm bees
Breakthrough ‘gene silencing' technique uses naturally occurring soil bacteria to kill specific crop-destroying pests without harming other insects or the environment Non-toxic pest control could help feed growing global population, boost organic food production and drive bio-fuel production Experiments show up to 92% more crops survive with this approach compared to no pest control A University of Sussex mathematician, Dr Konstantin Blyus

Life Sciences - 02.05.2019
Scientists explore the evolution of animal homosexuality
Scientists explore the evolution of animal homosexuality
Researchers are using a new approach to understand why same-sex behaviour is so common across the animal kingdom. In 1910, a team of scientists set off on the Terra Nova Expedition to explore Antarctica. Among them was George Murray Levick, a zoologist and photographer who would be the first researcher to study the world's largest Adélie penguin colony.

Life Sciences - Health - 01.05.2019
How both mother and baby genes affect birth weight
The largest study of its kind, which has used genetic information from Bristol's Children of the 90s, has led to new insights into the complex relationships surrounding how mothers' and babies' genes influence birth weight. The research, published , identifies 190 links between our genetic code and birth weight, two-thirds of which are identified for the first time.

Life Sciences - 01.05.2019
The hunger gaps: how flowering times affect farmland bees
The hunger gaps: how flowering times affect farmland bees
For the very first time, researchers from the University of Bristol have measured farmland nectar supplies throughout the whole year and revealed hungry gaps when food supply is not meeting pollinator demand. This novel finding reveals new ways of making farmland better for pollinators, benefitting the many crop plants and wildflowers that depend on them.

Computer Science / Telecom - 01.05.2019
Businesses that embrace digital technologies are showing more resilience as Brexit uncertainty continues, report shows
New technologies are giving businesses in Wales a much needed boost while questions over Brexit continue, researchers say. Academics from Cardiff University's Welsh Economy Research Unit surveyed 479 small and medium enterprises (SMEs) as part of the 2018 Digital Maturity Survey. They say the results demonstrate a clear link between a business's success and its uptake of new digital opportunities.

Life Sciences - 30.04.2019
Screening for rare but important disease ’biomarkers’ gets an accuracy boost
Researchers have created a system that can detect and quantify small and rare biological molecules that are important for detecting disease early. Certain molecules in biological fluids like blood and urine can be indicators of disease, especially if they become more prevalent. However, in the early stages of disease these ‘biomarkers' are rare and can be difficult to detect.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 30.04.2019
Offers insight into the proteins in the brain that detect cannabis
Offers insight into the proteins in the brain that detect cannabis
Researchers at the University of Bristol have made new progress in understanding how cannabinoid receptors (CB1Rs), the proteins that detect the active components of marijuana, are controlled in the brain. The brain contains about 100 billion nerve cells that are constantly communicating with one another at specialised junctions called synapses.

Health - 30.04.2019
Reveals hip and knee replacement performance in England and Wales
Reveals hip and knee replacement performance in England and Wales
The performance of different prosthetic implant combinations used in patients undergoing hip and knee replacements in England and Wales over the last 14 years have, for the first time, been directly compared in two new studies. The University of Bristol findings, published in the BMJ Open today [Tuesday 30 April], reveal substantial variability in the performance of different joint replacements, and the number of patients requiring a second surgery.

Life Sciences - Environment - 30.04.2019
Pesticide exposure causes bumblebee flight to fall short
Pesticide exposure causes bumblebee flight to fall short
Bees exposed to a neonicotinoid pesticide fly only a third of the distance that unexposed bees are able to achieve. Flight behaviour is crucial for determining how bees forage, so reduced flight performance from pesticide exposure could lead to colonies going hungry and pollination services being impacted.

Life Sciences - Health - 29.04.2019
Scientists solve the 800 year old mystery of an ancient bone disease
Scientific research at the molecular level on a collection of medieval skeletons from Norton Priory in Cheshire could help rewrite history after revealingthey were affected by an unusual ancient form of the bone disorder, Paget's disease. The study, coordinated by researchers at the University of Nottingham, involved analysing proteins and genetic material preserved in the bones and teeth that are more than 800 years old.

Law / Forensics - 29.04.2019
Could a lack of confidence in design law reduce innovation in the UK?
UK designers are less likely to seek legal action if someone copies their work compared with the rest of Europe, according to new research. Experts at the University of Nottingham tested the effectiveness of design case law in the 28 member states of the EU. Among the big countries in the EU, the UK had some of the lowest numbers of cases brought to court per population, often with less favourable outcomes for designers.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.04.2019
¤8m research project aims to develop new ’cure’ for epilepsy
A new European research project which aims to heal epilepsy by regenerating brain tissue and ‘training' neurons is getting underway. The five-year, ¤8m Hybrid Enhanced Regenerative Medicine Systems project - HERMES - brings together 12 partners from seven EU countries to heal brain disorders using transplants which combine biological and artificial components.

Social Sciences - 29.04.2019
Shows older men feel ‘excluded, overlooked and cut-off’
29 April 2019 With increasing numbers of older men experiencing loneliness, a new report published today [29 APRIL] calls for a better understanding of how to tackle the growing public health challenge. A two-year study, led by the University of Bristol in collaboration with Age UK , highlights the issues faced by older men, many of whom describe feeling socially excluded, overlooked, cut-off and feeling 'left out of things' - all of which have a range of negative impacts on day-to-day life.

Health - Computer Science / Telecom - 26.04.2019
Cancer treatment could become more effective thanks to computer algorithms
Cancer treatment could become more effective thanks to computer algorithms
While network algorithms are usually associated with finding friends on social media, researchers at the University of Sussex have shown how they could also be used improve the effectiveness of cancer treatment, by predicting the interactions between genes. There are over 12 million newly diagnosed cases of cancer globally each year and this figure only continues to grow.

Music - 26.04.2019
Music and mindful music listening may improve stroke recovery
Music and mindful music listening may help people who have suffered strokes recover their impaired cognitive abilities more effectively, new research suggests. In a new paper published in the International Journal of Stroke, researchers and clinicians from the Universities of Glasgow, Edinburgh, and East Anglia and NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde report on the outcomes of a study which aimed to investigate the effects of combining music listening and mindfulness techniques on recovery after a stroke.

Health - Pharmacology - 26.04.2019
Imperial launches world's first Centre for Psychedelics Research
Imperial launches world’s first Centre for Psychedelics Research
The first formal centre for psychedelic research in the world will launch at Imperial College London today. Funded by more than £3 million from five founding donors, the new Imperial Centre for Psychedelic Research will build on over a decade of pioneering work in this area carried out at Imperial, including a clinical trial that has kick-started global efforts to develop psilocybin therapy into a licensed treatment for depression.

Pharmacology - Health - 25.04.2019
Researchers in international drive to develop safer drugs
Medical researchers at the University of Nottingham and NIHR Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre are part of a major new international research project to improve the safety and regulation in the development of drugs. The team of experts in drug-induced liver injury will be members of the Translational Safety Biomarker Pipeline (TransBioLine) - a pioneering project which will generate data to support the development of novel safety biomarkers for five target organ systems (kidney, liver, pancreas, vascular and central nervous system) for use in drug development.

Health - Life Sciences - 25.04.2019
Chemical probes pave the way for a better understanding of disease development
Chemical probes pave the way for a better understanding of disease development
Researchers can now tag proteins in live cells that have modifications associated with disease. Proteins produced in cells often undergo modifications by enzymes after they are formed. One type of modification, called prenylation, adds ‘tags' to proteins that tells them where to go in the cell and how to interact with other proteins.