News 2019


Category


Years
2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012/2012 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009


Results 21 - 40 of 45.


Business / Economics - 11.01.2019
Gamblers predicted Brexit before financial traders
Gamblers predicted Brexit before financial traders
Research shows how financial markets should have predicted Brexit hours before they eventually did, and that betting markets beat currency markets to the result by an hour - producing a "close to risk-free" profit-making opportunity, according to economists.†† It looks like the gamblers had a better sense that Leave could win, or that it could at least go either way Tom Auld International finance markets lagged behind punters having a flutter whe

Psychology - Health - 11.01.2019
Autistic people urgently need access to tailored mental health support
New research has revealed that people diagnosed with autism don't have access to effective mental health support, putting them at risk of self-harm and suicide. Researchers from the University of Nottingham, Coventry University and the University of Cambridge worked with a steering group of Autistic adults to design and carry out the research which has recenlty been published in the journal Autism.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.01.2019
Brain's 'support cells' help mammals to keep time
Brain’s ’support cells’ help mammals to keep time
'Caretaker' cells which support neurons in the brain play more of an active role in circadian rhythms and animal behaviour than previously thought. Astrocytes are star-shaped nerve cells found in the brain and spinal cord that were thought to support neurons in regulating circadian rhythms - the body's internal 24-hour 'clock'.

Health - Pharmacology - 09.01.2019
HRT tablets increase risk of blood clots in women
Women who use certain types of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) are at a higher risk of developing potentially life-threatening blood clots, new research has confirmed. The study, undertaken by researchers at The University of Nottingham and published in the BMJ , found that the risk of developing blood clots was only increased for women using HRT in tablet form and was slightly higher for higher dosages.

Life Sciences - Health - 09.01.2019
Potential new way to target norovirus family
Researchers have made a significant breakthrough in understanding how a family of viruses, including the norovirus, initiate infections. The new study which includes norovirus and sapoviruses - highly infectious viruses that can cause outbreaks of diarrhoea and vomiting. It is hoped this research may provide a new target for the development of antiviral drugs to prevent diseases like norovirus.

Innovation / Technology - 09.01.2019
Batteries predicted to become the cheapest option for storing electricity
Batteries predicted to become the cheapest option for storing electricity
By 2050, batteries based on lithium-ion will be the cheapest way to store electricity, such as from solar or wind farms, according to a new study. The new research calculates the cost of storing energy with different technologies, including large-scale batteries and pumped-storage hydroelectricity, and predicts those costs into the future.

Earth Sciences - 09.01.2019
Subglacial weathering alters nutrient cycles in Greenland
Subglacial weathering alters nutrient cycles in Greenland
The nutrient cycles that underpin how carbon is stored and released from two of Greenland's glaciers is significantly affected by subglacial weathering, a new study has found, shedding further light on the geochemistry of meltwaters. The study, led by a team of isotope geochemists and glaciologists from the University of Bristol, measured the geochemical signature of the silica released from the Leverett Glacier in Southwest Greenland and the Kiattuut Sermiat in South Greenland.

Environment - 09.01.2019
Is using drones to tackle climate change
Is using drones to tackle climate change
A team of Nottingham scientists is using drones to survey woody climbing plants and better understand how they may affect the carbon balance of tropical rainforests. The findings of the study - ‘ A view from above: Unmanned Aerial Vehicles provide a new tool for assessing liana infestation in tropical forest canopies' , have been published today in the Journal of Applied Ecology.

Mathematics - 09.01.2019
Census data could be used to improve city neighbourhoods
A new analysis of the 2011 census has revealed that social differences among city populations significantly influence how neighbourhoods take shape. Researchers hope that their insights could help councils to make better planning decisions. Dr Thilo Gross and Dr Edmund Barter in the Department of Engineering Mathematics at the University of Bristol, used a new algorithm to gain insight into city neighbourhood characteristics, starting with Bristol.

Computer Science / Telecom - 08.01.2019
Imperial experts create robot helper to understand and respond to human movement
Researchers at Imperial have created a new robot controller using game theory, allowing the robot to learn when to assist a human. The past decade has seen robots work increasingly with humans - for example in manufacturing, assistive devices for physically impaired individuals, and in surgery. However, robots cannot currently react in a personalised way to individual users, which limits their usefulness to humans.

Environment - 08.01.2019
A century and half of reconstructed ocean warming offers clues for the future
Due to a scarcity of data, most global estimates of ocean warming start only in the 1950s. However, a team of scientists at the University of Oxford has now succeeded in reconstructing ocean temperature change from 1871 to 2017. Over the past century, increased greenhouse gas emissions have given rise to an excess of energy in the Earth system.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.01.2019
Scientists call for increased diversity in genomic research
Scientists call for increased diversity in genomic research
A growing number of genomic studies have generated important discoveries regarding human health and behaviour, but new research from the University of Oxford suggests that scientific advancement is limited by a lack of diversity.† The findings show that the people studied in genetic discovery research continue to be overwhelmingly of European descent, but also for the first time reveal that subjects are concentrated in a handful of countries - the UK, US and Iceland, and have specific demographic characteristics.

Health - 07.01.2019
Recent report places Glasgow as UK lead in pancreatic cancer research
A recent report has revealed that half of the top dozen UK pancreatic cancer researchers are based in Glasgow, with all six being affiliated with the University of Glasgow. The analysis, from the expertscape.com, confirms Glasgow's position as a leading centre of excellence for pancreatic cancer.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.01.2019
New material could ’drive wound healing’ using the body’s inbuilt healing system
Imperial researchers have developed a new bioinspired material that interacts with surrounding tissues to promote healing. Materials are widely used to help heal wounds: Collagen sponges help treat burns and pressure sores , and scaffold-like implants are used to repair broken bones. However, the process of tissue repair changes over time, so scientists are looking to biomaterials that interact with tissues as healing takes place.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.01.2019
New materials could ’drive wound healing’ by harnessing natural healing methods
Imperial researchers have developed new bioinspired material that interacts with surrounding tissues to promote healing. Materials are widely used to help heal wounds: Collagen sponges help treat burns and pressure sores , and scaffold-like implants are used to repair broken bones. However, the process of tissue repair changes over time, so scientists are looking to biomaterials that interact with tissues as healing takes place.

Health - Pharmacology - 07.01.2019
Automated phone calls may help patients to take medicines as prescribed, pilot study suggests
Automated phone calls may help patients to take medicines as prescribed, pilot study suggests
Remembering to take medication is vital for managing long term health conditions such as high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, or multiple conditions. Latest research from the University of Cambridge suggests that using interactive voice response (IVR) technology supports patients to take their medicine as prescribed.

Health - Life Sciences - 04.01.2019
Recurrent miscarriage linked to faulty sperm
Multiple miscarriages may be linked to the poor quality of a man's sperm, suggests new research. The early-stage study, from scientists at Imperial College London , investigated the sperm quality of 50 men whose partners had suffered three or more consecutive miscarriages.

Environment - 04.01.2019
Upstart sparrows and chasing waterfalls: News from the College
From textbook-defying sparrows to powerful waterfalls, here is some quick-read news from across the College. Textbook-defying sparrows A seemingly well-established hypothesis in biology may need a rethink. The ‘status signalling hypothesis' says that certain physical attributes of animals reflect their dominance in the group, regardless of age, body size and body condition.

Life Sciences - 03.01.2019
Naked mole-rats
Why do we use naked mole-rats? The naked mole-rat is a mammal with a truly bizarre appearance, looking like an elongated cocktail sausage with large, protruding teeth. Naked mole-rats live in large underground colonies of approximately 80 animals, which are dominated by a single breeding female, the queen; this social system is highly unusual in mammals†but is similar to that commonly observed in bees and termites.

Environment - Life Sciences - 03.01.2019
Window into previously unseen part of glacial environment
The Greenland Ice Sheet emits tons of methane, according to a new study showing that subglacial biological activity impacts the atmosphere far more than previously thought. An international team, including researchers from Cardiff University, camped for three months next to the Greenland Ice Sheet, sampling the meltwater that runs off a large catchment (> 600 km2) of the Ice Sheet during the summer months.