news 2018


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Chemistry - Medicine/Pharmacology
19.01.2018
Chemical ’MP3 Player’ breakthrough converts digital code into pharmaceuticals
A new method of drug manufacture which uses 3D printers to create pharmaceuticals on demand could lead to a ‘Spotify for chemistry', scientists claim. In a new paper published today (January 19) in the journal Science, researchers from the University of Glasgow present for the first time a new approach to the manufacture of pharmaceuticals which can be made using a digital code.
Business/Economics - Innovation/Technology
19.01.2018
Gut instinct trumps evidence at the polls
People are more likely to go with their gut and trust personal opinions irrespective of evidence that might be presented during an election or referendum campaign, according to an important new economic study. A new paper, published by our Department of Economics , shows that voters tend to retain strong attachment to their own opinions even when this is challenged by evidence.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
18.01.2018
Blows not concussion cause brain disease, according to new research
A new Oxford University collaboration suggests that blows to the head can cause lasting trauma - even in the absence of signs of concussion. This could mean that attempts to monitor and prevent concussions in sport, such as new designs for helmets, may be futile, since nothing can change the motion of head movement inflicted by a flying tackle.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Innovation/Technology
18.01.2018
Ebola immunity detector has been developed, scientists reveal
Ebola immunity detector has been developed, scientists reveal
A prototype device for gauging patients' immunity to Ebola has been developed by a multi-institutional team of experts led by Imperial College London. The device, which was developed in collaboration with UCL , works in a similar way to a pregnancy test. However instead of detecting hormones, it looks for an antibody called Immunoglobulin G (IgG), which is released following exposure to certain viruses.
Business/Economics - Innovation/Technology
18.01.2018
How ’gut instinct’ trumps ’evidence’ when voters go to the polls
People are more likely to go with their gut and trust personal opinions irrespective of evidence that might be presented during an election or referendum campaign, according to an important new economic study. A new paper, published by our Department of Economics , shows that voters tend to retain strong attachment to their own opinions even when this is challenged by evidence.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
18.01.2018
Formation of human tissue to improve drug testing and reduce animal research
Formation of human tissue to improve drug testing and reduce animal research
Formation of human tissue to improve drug testing and reduce animal research (18 January 2018) Innovative three dimensional (3D) cell culture technology is giving scientists the ability to grow realistic human tissues for more effective drug testing while reducing the need for animal research. Alvetex , developed at Durham University's Department of Biosciences , is a highly porous polystyrene scaffold designed to support 3D growth of human tissues from cells cultured in the laboratory - such as skin and intestinal tissue - that closely resemble those found in the body.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
18.01.2018
AI 'scientist' finds that toothpaste ingredient may help fight drug-resistant malaria
AI ’scientist’ finds that toothpaste ingredient may help fight drug-resistant malaria
An ingredient commonly found in toothpaste could be employed as an anti-malarial drug against strains of malaria parasite that have grown resistant to one of the currently-used drugs. This discovery, led by researchers at the University of Cambridge, was aided by Eve, an artificially-intelligent 'robot scientist'.
Careers/Employment - Administration/Government
18.01.2018
Whitehall fails to fully exploit talents of non-exec directors, finds UCL study
Whitehall fails to fully exploit talents of non-exec directors, finds UCL study
Whitehall is failing to fully exploit the expertise of non-executive directors (NEDs) to improve the way departments' policies and plans are devised and implemented despite their high calibre, commitment and experience, a study by UCL's Constitution Unit has found. The study, which was led by Professor Robert Hazell, found civil servants "greatly valued" the advice and expertise of NEDs but that the non-executive directors themselves found the role frustrating and felt they could be much more effective if the system only allowed.
Life Sciences - History/Archeology
17.01.2018
Origins of the Bornean elephant
The mystery behind the origins of the Bornean elephant has been uncovered by collaborative research between Cardiff University and researchers across the globe. How the endangered species of elephants came to live in Borneo has been unknown, until a recent study discovered part of the story, finding that elephants might have migrated between the Sunda Islands in Southeast Asia during low sea levels.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Agronomy/Food Science
16.01.2018
Could re-designing supermarkets, bars and restaurants
Could re-designing supermarkets, bars and restaurants "nudge" us towards healthy habits?
Behavioural and cognitive scientists at the Universities of Cambridge and Bristol today launched a new four year programme of research funded by a prestigious Wellcome Collaborative Award in Science to investigate ways to 'nudge' people towards healthier behaviour. This includes improving diets, reducing alcohol consumption, and stopping smoking - in order to improve health across the population.
Life Sciences - Mechanical Engineering/Mechanics
16.01.2018
How the temperature of your nose shows how much strain you are under
Researchers at the University of Nottingham's Institute for Aerospace Technology (IAT), together with academic staff from the Bioengineering and Human Factors Research Groups, have demonstrated that facial temperatures, which can be easily measured using a non-invasive thermal camera, are strongly correlated to mental workload.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
16.01.2018
Statins are safe for children with abnormal cholesterol levels
Statins are safe for children with abnormal cholesterol levels
Statins are safe for children living with genetically high cholesterol, according to new research from UCL, funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) and published in the Journal of Clinical Lipidology. The charity says the findings will 'reassure' parents of children with Familial Hypercholesterolaemia (FH) - an inherited condition that significantly increases the risk of a heart attack in their 40s, 30s or even 20s.
Computer Science/Telecom - Chemistry
15.01.2018
Protocells with unpredictable complexity tamed by artificial intelligence
In new University of Glasgow research published today (January 15) in the journal PNAS , a robot equipped with artificial intelligence was able to build unstable oil-in-water droplets as models for new artificial life forms. It was also able to predict their properties ahead of time even though conventional physical methods failed to do so.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
15.01.2018
How incurable mitochondrial diseases strike previously unaffected families
How incurable mitochondrial diseases strike previously unaffected families
Researchers have shown for the first time how children can inherit a severe - potentially fatal - mitochondrial disease from a healthy mother. The study, led by researchers from the MRC Mitochondrial Biology Unit at the University of Cambridge, reveals that healthy people harbour mutations in their mitochondrial DNA and explains how cases of severe mitochondrial disease can appear unexpectedly in previously unaffected families.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Administration/Government
15.01.2018
War in Ukraine has escalated HIV spread in the country
Conflict in Ukraine has increased the risk of HIV outbreaks throughout the country as displaced HIV-infected people move from war-affected regions to areas with higher risk of transmission, according to analysis by scientists. Ukraine, which has the highest HIV prevalence in Europe, has been at war since 2014 following political unrest in the country.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Innovation/Technology
12.01.2018
New technology for diagnosing immunity to Ebola
New technology for diagnosing immunity to Ebola
A promising new approach to detect immunity to Ebola virus infection has been developed by researchers from i-sense in a collaboration between UCL and Imperial College London. Published in ACS Nano , the new approach uses lateral flow technology, similar to that of a pregnancy test, coupled with smartphones to provide a promising alternative to lab-based testing.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
12.01.2018
Can psychedelic drugs ’reconnect’ depressed patients with their emotions?
Imperial research suggests psilocybin can help relieve the symptoms of depression, without blunting of the emotions linked with antidepressant drugs. Working out if someone is happy, angry or afraid, from the look on their face, is a skill we may take for granted. For some people, however, such as those with chronic depression, this innate ability to pick up on and respond to emotional prompts like a facial expression can be disrupted, with the brain becoming oversensitive to negative stimuli.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Careers/Employment
12.01.2018
Nurse staffing levels linked to patient satisfaction
Satisfaction with care in hospitals declines when patients believe there are not enough nurses on wards, according to a new study based on the NHS Inpatient Survey published in the BMJ Open . Only 14 per cent of patients who reported there was never or rarely enough nurses on the hospital ward rated their care as excellent, while 57 percent of patients who reported there were usually enough nurses rated their care as excellent.
Medicine/Pharmacology
12.01.2018
Adverse impact of both type 2 and type 1 diabetes on pregnancy outcomes
Adverse impact of both type 2 and type 1 diabetes on pregnancy outcomes
A new study published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes [EASD]) reveals that both type 2 (T2D) and type 1 diabetes (T1D) are associated with complications during pregnancy including stillbirths and emergency Caesarean sections, as well as increasing the risk of infant mortality.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Agronomy/Food Science
12.01.2018
Women’s reproductive health linked to risk of heart disease and stroke
Girls who start their periods before they turn 12 are at greater risk of developing heart disease and stroke in later life, according to a new study of nearly 300,000 women in the UK by The George Institute for Global Health at the University of Oxford. Women who give birth at a young age, experience miscarriage or stillbirth, or who go through the menopause early, are also more likely to develop cardiovascular disease when they get older, the study found.
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