news 2017


Category
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology - 20.09
Genome editing reveals role of gene important for human embryo development
Genome editing reveals role of gene important for human embryo development
Researchers have used genome editing technology to reveal the role of a key gene in human embryos in the first few days of development. This is the first time that genome editing has been used to study gene function in human embryos, which could help scientists to better understand the biology of our early development.

Psychology - 20.09
One in four girls is depressed at age 14
One in four girls is depressed at age 14
New research shows a quarter of girls (24%) and one in 10 boys (9%) are depressed at age 14. Researchers from the UCL Institute of Education and the University of Liverpool analysed information on more than 10,000 children born in 2000-01 who are taking part in the Millennium Cohort Study.

Psychology - 20.09
Guess who? Facial expressions can cause confusion
Guess who? Facial expressions can cause confusion
Photos of the same person can look substantially different. For example, your passport photo may look quite different from your driving licence, or your face in holiday photos. In fact, these differences can mean you look like a different person from one photo to the next, to those that don't know you.

Social Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology - 20.09
Study suggests you can ‘pick up’ a good or bad mood from your friends - but it also suggests that depression doesn’t have the same effect
New research suggests that both good and bad moods can be ‘picked up' from friends, but depression can't. A team led by the University of Warwick has examined whether friends' moods can affect an individual therefore implying that moods may spread across friendship networks.

Physics/Materials Science - 20.09
Nanoscale printing breakthrough creates two colours per pixel
Scientists have developed a new form of high-resolution ‘printing' which could have wide-ranging applications in data storage, anti-counterfeiting measures, and digital imaging. Dr Alasdair Clark discusses plasmonic colour New research from the University of Glasgow, published today (Wednesday 20 September) in the journal Advanced Functional Materials , outlines how engineers have developed nano-scale plasmonic colour filters that display different colours depending on the orientation of the light which hits it.

Social Sciences - Sport Sciences - 19.09
Winner takes all: Success enhances taste for luxury goods, study suggests
Winner takes all: Success enhances taste for luxury goods, study suggests
Footballers in flashy cars, City workers in Armani suits, reality TV celebrities sipping expensive champagne while sitting in hot tubs: what drives people to purchase luxury goods' New research suggests that it may be a sense of being a 'winner' - but that contrary to expectations, it is not driven by testosterone.

Astronomy - 19.09
Size matters in the detection of exoplanet atmospheres
Size matters in the detection of exoplanet atmospheres
A group-analysis of 30 exoplanets orbiting distant stars suggests that size, not mass, is a key factor in whether a planet's atmosphere can be detected according to a UCL-led team of European researchers.

Life Sciences - 18.09
Eyes that lie: protective deception of eyespots confirmed
Eyes that lie: protective deception of eyespots confirmed
The widespread occurrence of eyespots, from butterflies to fish, has intrigued biologists for years but the mechanism behind their function has, until now, remained unclear. New evidence published recently in The American Naturalist shows that prey eyespots intimidate predators because they associate the eyelike appearance of eyespots with the threat posed by their own enemy.

Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology - 18.09
Cells programmed like computers to fight disease
Cells can be programmed like a computer to fight cancer, influenza and other serious health conditions - breakthrough research by University of Warwick Common molecule found in humans, plants and animals can be genetically engineered into sequences - like computer code in software - to control actions of a cell Different sequences could be tailor-made to target diverse diseases or injuries - li

Psychology - Medicine/Pharmacology - 15.09
Treating insomnia may reduce mental health problems
Treating insomnia with online cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) could reduce mental health problems such as anxiety, depression, and paranoia, according to research. The study found that sleep disruption is a driving factor in the occurrence of paranoia, hallucinatory experiences, and other mental health problems in young adults with an average age of 25.

Life Sciences - Earth Sciences - 15.09
’Mysterious’ ancient creature was definitely an animal, research confirms
'Mysterious' ancient creature was definitely an animal, research confirms
It lived well over 550 million years ago, is known only through fossils and has variously been described as looking a bit like a jellyfish, a worm, a fungus and lichen. But was the 'mysterious' Dickinsonia an animal, or was it something else? Recent findings suggest animals had evolved several million years before the 'Cambrian Explosion' that has been the focus of attention for studies into animal evolution for so long.

Life Sciences - 15.09
Happiness is not determined by childhood biomarkers
Happiness is not determined by childhood biomarkers
Happiness is not determined by childhood biological markers such as height or body fat, according to a team of European researchers involving UCL.  The paper, published in PLoS ONE analysed longitudinal data from nearly 2000 young Finns over a period of 20 years.

Life Sciences - Earth Sciences - 14.09
’Mysterious’ ancient creature was definitely an animal, research confirms
It lived well over 550 million years ago, is known only through fossils and has variously been described as looking a bit like a jellyfish, a worm, a fungus and lichen. But was the 'mysterious' Dickinsonia an animal, or was it something else? A new study by researchers at the universities of Oxford, Cambridge, Bristol, and the British Geological Survey provides strong proof that Dickinsonia was an animal, confirming recent findings suggesting that animals evolved millions of years before the so-called Cambrian Explosion of animal life.

Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 14.09
Targeted antibiotic use may help cure Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia
The antibiotic tigecycline, when used in combination with current treatment, may hold the key to eradicating chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) cells, according to new research. ‌ The University of Glasgow led study, published today , demonstrates the effectiveness of combining tigecycline with the drug imatinib - a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) and standard first-line treatment of patients with CML.

Life Sciences - 13.09
New way to control memory
New way to control memory
Scientists discover a new way to control memory. The workings of a ‘traffic light system' in the brain, which plays a key role in how new memories are formed, have been detailed for the first time by scientists.

Astronomy - Chemistry - 13.09
Inferno world with titanium skies
Inferno world with titanium skies
An international team of astronomers has detected titanium oxide in the atmosphere of an exoplanet for the first time. The results provide unique information about the chemical composition and the temperature and pressure structure of the atmosphere of this unusual and very hot world.

Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 13.09
Low-level radiation less harmful to health than other lifestyle risks
Low-level radiation exposure poses less of a health risk than other modern lifestyle threats, such as smoking, obesity and air pollution, according to Oxford University research. Human populations have always been exposed to ionizing radiation, and more so in modern life due to its use in medicine, industry and the armed forces.

Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 13.09
Study clears important hurdle towards developing an HIV vaccine
Study clears important hurdle towards developing an HIV vaccine
An international team of researchers has demonstrated a way of overcoming one of the major stumbling blocks that has prevented the development of a vaccine against HIV: the ability to generate immune cells that stay in circulation long enough to respond to and stop virus infection.

Medicine/Pharmacology - 12.09
Cancer survivors who quit smoking sooner can live longer
Lung cancer survivors who quit smoking within a year of diagnosis will live for longer than those who continue to smoke, according to new research led by the Universities of Oxford and Birmingham. The findings also revealed that general practitioners are comparatively less likely to intervene and offer stop-smoking support to cancer patients, than they are to people diagnosed with coronary heart disease.

Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology - 12.09
Explaining bursts of activity in brains of preterm babies
Explaining bursts of activity in brains of preterm babies
The source of spontaneous, high-amplitude bursts of activity seen in the brains of preterm babies, which are vital for healthy development, has been identified by a team led by researchers at UCL and King's College London.

Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology - 12.09
Explaining bursts of activity in preterm human brains
The source of spontaneous, high-amplitude bursts of activity seen in the brains of preterm babies, which are vital for healthy development, has been identified by a team led by researchers at UCL and King's College London.

Physics/Materials Science - Earth Sciences - 12.09
Tectonic plates ’weaker than previously thought’, say scientists
Experiments carried out at Oxford University have revealed that tectonic plates are weaker than previously thought.  The finding explains an ambiguity in lab work that led scientists to believe these rocks were much stronger than they appeared to be in the natural world.

Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology - 12.09
Lab-grown bone cell breakthrough heralds new benefits for orthopaedics
Technology originally developed to detect gravitational waves is being used to generate tissue engineered bone grafts for future use in orthopaedic medicine, scientists report in a new paper published today (Tuesday 12 September).

Life Sciences - 12.09
Genes linked with education and fertility depend on when and where you live
Different genes affect educational attainment and fertility in different times and places, according to new research from the University of Oxford. This means we could be missing important variations when we try to draw conclusions about the influence of genes on human behaviour, because combining data sets from vastly different countries and historical periods could muddy the waters.

Medicine/Pharmacology - 12.09
Sobering evidence on drinking during pregnancy: do we know how little is too much?
Sobering evidence on drinking during pregnancy: do we know how little is too muc
New research from the University of Bristol suggests that consuming even small amounts of alcohol in pregnancy may be linked with higher chances of having a small baby and delivering prematurely. However, researchers actually found very few studies investigating light drinking during pregnancy.

Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 11.09
European Commission reverses decision on drug, following QMUL research
European Commission reverses decision on drug, following QMUL research
A drug for multiple sclerosis (MS) has been granted a license by the European Commission, following evidence from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) that it improves patients' quality of life and is safer than previously thought.

Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 11.09
Omega 3 helps the gut stay healthy, study finds
Taking omega-3 as part of a healthy diet with plenty of fibre and probiotic foods can improve the diversity of the gut microbiome according to a new study by researchers at the University of Nottingham and King's College London.

Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 11.09
Test your mental skills with an Artificial Intelligence tool called Cognitron
Test your mental skills with an Artificial Intelligence tool called Cognitron
The first artificial intelligence (AI) designed to model human mental skills has been developed by researchers from Imperial College London. The AI, called Cognitron , has been developed by a team of psychologists, neuroscientists and engineers at the College.

Business/Economics - Careers/Employment - 11.09
Employee outsourcing hides slaves in the workforce, shows research
Employee outsourcing hides slaves in the workforce, shows research
Failure to monitor outsourced recruitment is resulting in companies inadvertently employing victims of modern slavery, according to new research led by our School of Management. Interview - The research, conducted with the University of Sheffield, suggests that layers of outsourcing, subcontracting and informal hiring of temporary staff are to blame.

Life Sciences - 8.09
Fathers can influence the sex of their offspring, scientists show
But a new study in wild mice led by Dr Aurelio Malo of Oxford University's Department of Zoology has shown that fathers can, in fact, influence sex ratios. The paper is published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B and involves researchers from the UK, Spain and the USA.

Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 7.09
New diagnosis for Alzheimer’s
Medicine/Pharmacology - Civil Engineering/Traffic Engineering - 6.09
Statins reduce deaths from heart disease by 28 per cent, says longest ever study
Pedagogy/Education Science - Medicine/Pharmacology - 31.08
Children’s sleep quality linked to mothers’ insomnia
Mechanical Engineering/Mechanics - Physics/Materials Science - 31.08
Motorised molecules drill into cancer cells
Environment/Sustainable Development - Earth Sciences - 29.08
Conservation hindered by geographical mismatches between capacity and need
Physics/Materials Science - Earth Sciences - 29.08
Sense of smell is key factor in bird navigation
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 29.08
New technology could predict the risk of type 2 diabetes
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 28.08
Potential new improved way to kill cancer cells
Medicine/Pharmacology - Administration/Government - 23.08
New scan developed to predict stroke risk
Business/Economics - Social Sciences - 23.08
Personality drives purchasing of luxury goods
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology - 21.08
Scientists to study oral bacteria that cause heart valve infection
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology - 21.08
People who hear voices can detect hidden speech in unusual sounds
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology - 21.08
People who hear voices can detect hidden speech
Pedagogy/Education Science - Medicine/Pharmacology - 20.08
Health benefits from lone parents welfare to work policies unlikely
Agronomy/Food Science - Medicine/Pharmacology - 17.08
Children who skip breakfast may not be getting recommended nutrients
Medicine/Pharmacology - Agronomy/Food Science - 15.08
’Fat but fit’ are at increased risk of heart disease
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology - 14.08
Brain responses to lip-reading can benefit cochlear implant users
Environment/Sustainable Development - Life Sciences - 14.08
August: origin of chloroplast | News | University of Bristol
Social Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology - 11.08
August: hazardous pesticides | News | University of Bristol
Physics/Materials Science - Computer Science/Telecom - 10.08
Surprise discovery in the search for energy efficient information storage
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology - 4.08
Unknown virus in ’throwaway’ DNA | University of Oxford
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 3.08
UofG involved in new Anthrax research
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology - 2.08
Trigger for weapons of bacterial warfare uncovered
Civil Engineering/Traffic Engineering - Environment/Sustainable Development - 25.07
Rainforest metropolis casts 1,000 km shadow on wildlife
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology - 21.07
Causes of severe antisocial behaviour may differ for boys and girls
Physics/Materials Science - Computer Science/Telecom - 19.07
Imaging breakthrough reveals magnets’ internal patterns
Physics/Materials Science - Environment/Sustainable Development - 18.07
Non-toxic alternative for next-generation solar cells
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology - 14.07
Protein may protect against heart attack
Medicine/Pharmacology - Agronomy/Food Science - 13.07
Body size and prostate cancer risk
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology - 12.07
Common strength ‘genes’ identified for first time
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 12.07
See-through heart tissue reveals hidden complexity
Astronomy - Physics/Materials Science - 11.07
Smallest-ever star discovered by astronomers
Civil Engineering/Traffic Engineering - Environment/Sustainable Development - 11.07
Caterpillars key to urban blue tits’ low breeding
Medicine/Pharmacology - Agronomy/Food Science - 10.07
Drinking coffee reduces risk of death from all causes, study finds
Astronomy - Physics/Materials Science - 10.07
Cosmic ‘dust factory’ reveals clues to how stars are born
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 10.07
Low iron levels may increase risk of heart disease
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology - 10.07
New insights into rare chronic pain condition
Medicine/Pharmacology - Psychology - 5.07
Wiki breakthrough for researchers
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology - 5.07
Research plays key role in malaria breakthrough
Environment/Sustainable Development - 5.07
Remote Amazonian cities more vulnerable to climate change
Medicine/Pharmacology - Administration/Government - 4.07
End of life support is lacking for homeless people

 
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