news 2017


Category
Physics/Materials Science - Environment/Sustainable Development - 20.11
Homes should not be abandoned after a big nuclear accident
Homes should not be abandoned after a big nuclear accident
New research suggests that few people, if any, should be asked to leave their homes after a big nuclear accident, which is what happened in March 2011 following the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster.

Business/Economics - 17.11
Grade inflation adds thousands to the cost of a family home
Grade inflation adds thousands to the cost of a family home
Grade inflation at English primary schools can increase the price of surrounding houses by up to £7,000, according to early research from economists at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL). The study finds that as parents are drawn to areas with what appear to be higher school scores, the demand for housing escalates and poorer residents are driven out.

Medicine/Pharmacology - 16.11
Prototype ear plug sensor could improve monitoring of vital signs
Prototype ear plug sensor could improve monitoring of vital signs
Scientists have developed a sensor that fits in the ear, with the aim of monitoring the heart, brain and lungs functions for health and fitness. In previous pilot studies that involved trialling the device with 24 people, the researchers from Imperial College London have demonstrated the prototype's potential for monitoring brain, heart and breathing activity.

Medicine/Pharmacology - Psychology - 16.11
Teenage depression linked to father’s depression
Teenage depression linked to father's depression
Adolescents whose fathers have depressive symptoms are more likely to experience symptoms of depression themselves, finds a new study led by UCL researchers. While the link between mothers' depression and depression in their children is well-established, the new Lancet Psychiatry study is the first to find an association between depression in fathers and their teenaged children, independent of whether the mother has depression, in a large sample in the general population.

Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 16.11
’Mini liver tumours’ created in a dish for the first time
Scientists have created mini biological models of human primary liver cancers, known as organoids, in the lab for the first time. In a paper published , the tiny laboratory models of tumours were used to identify a new drug that could potentially treat certain types of liver cancer.

Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 15.11
Raising ’good’ cholesterol fails to protect against heart disease
Raising so-called 'good' cholesterol by blocking a key protein involved in its metabolism does not protect against heart disease or stroke, according to a large genetic study of 150,000 Chinese adults published in the journal JAMA Cardiology.

Microtechnics/Electroengineering - Physics/Materials Science - 15.11
Optically tunable microwave antennas for 5G applications
Optically tunable microwave antennas for 5G applications
Multiband tunable antennas are a critical part of many communication and radar systems. New research by engineers at the University of Bristol has shown significant advances in antennas by using optically induced plasmas in silicon to tune both radiation patterns and operation frequency.

Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology - 15.11
Signalling protein found to drive heart scarring and organ failure
Signalling protein found to drive heart scarring and organ failure
A part of the immune system once thought to prevent organ damage is actually a leading cause of scarring and heart failure, a study has found. Researchers at Imperial College London discovered that a protein called interleukin 11 (IL-11) plays a key role in the scarring process, which in turn causes heart, kidney and liver failure.

Environment/Sustainable Development - Life Sciences - 15.11
Amazonian streams found teeming with fish species are lacking protection
Signalling protein found to drive heart scarring and organ failure
Hundreds of thousands of Amazonian streams are teeming with highly diverse populations of fish species, a new study reveals. Scientists have found that small streams, in areas of the eastern Brazilian Amazon that are a mixture of forest and farmland, contain fauna new to science, as well as very rare species.

Medicine/Pharmacology - 15.11
Good glucose control could be bad in type 2 diabetes
The common approach of intensive glucose control to achieve low blood sugar targets in type 2 diabetes can increase the risk of mortality, finds a study by Cardiff University. Looking at routine data from over 300,000 people in the UK, collected between 2004 and 2015, researchers found that lower levels of glycated haemoglobin—typically regarded as being good diabetes control—were associated with increased mortality risk, compared to moderate levels, especially in conjunction with intensive treatments that could cause hypoglycaemia.

Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 15.11
Improving clinical trials with machine learning
Improving clinical trials with machine learning
Machine learning could improve our ability to determine whether a new drug works in the brain, potentially enabling researchers to detect drug effects that would be missed entirely by conventional statistical tests, finds a new UCL study published today in Brain .

Physics/Materials Science - Astronomy - 15.11
Hunt for dark matter is narrowed by new University of Sussex research
Hunt for dark matter is narrowed by new University of Sussex research
Hunt for dark matter is narrowed by new University of Sussex research. Scientists at the University of Sussex have disproved the existence of a specific type of axion - an important candidate ‘dark matter' particle - across a wide range of its possible masses.

Social Sciences - Life Sciences - 15.11
It’s (not) complicated: relationships may be simpler than they seem
New research sheds light on how social networks can evolve by showing that complex social patterns observed across the animal kingdom may be simpler than they appear. Image credit: Shutterstock New Oxford University research has shed light on the complexities involved in forming social bonds, and suggests that the process is much simpler than first thought.  Scientists from Oxford's Department of Zoology worked in collaboration with their peers at the University of Exeter to assess social patterns across the animal kingdom.

Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology - 14.11
Antibiotic Discovery in the Abyss
Antibiotic Discovery in the Abyss
Combining the innovations of synthetic biology with robotic environmental sampling, a team of University of Bristol researchers are travelling to some of the most 'extreme' environments on Earth, including Atlantic depths of 4.5km, to find new leads which could help in the global fight against antimicrobial resistance.

Medicine/Pharmacology - 14.11
Targeting cancer without destroying healthy T-cells
A unique approach to targeting the abnormal T-cells that cause T-cell lymphomas could offer hope to patients with the aggressive and difficult-to-treat family of cancers, finds a study involving researchers from Cardiff University.

Medicine/Pharmacology - 13.11
Breastfed babies are less likely to have eczema as teenagers, study shows
Breastfed babies are less likely to have eczema as teenagers, study shows
Babies whose mothers had received support to breastfeed exclusively for a sustained period from birth have a 54 per cent lower risk of eczema at the age of 16, a new study led by researchers from King's College London, Harvard University, University of Bristol and McGill University shows.

Medicine/Pharmacology - 13.11
Breastfed babies are less likely to have eczema as teenagers, study shows
Babies whose mothers had received support to breastfeed exclusively for a sustained period from birth have a 54% lower risk of eczema at the age of 16, a new study led by researchers from King's College London, Harvard University, University of Bristol and McGill University shows.

Medicine/Pharmacology - Social Sciences - 13.11
Society’s excluded people ten times more likely to die early
Society's excluded people ten times more likely to die early
People excluded from mainstream society in high-income countries have a tenfold increased risk of early death, according to research from UCL, homeless health charity Pathway and an international team of experts.

Business/Economics - Mathematics - 10.11
No-growth economy could mean fewer crashes and higher wages, study shows
No-growth economy could mean fewer crashes and higher wages, study shows
No-growth economy could mean fewer crashes and higher wages, study shows. An economy based on zero growth could be more stable - experiencing fewer crashes - and bring higher wages, suggests a new University of Sussex study.

Medicine/Pharmacology - 10.11
HPV jab means women only need three cervical screens in a lifetime
HPV jab means women only need three cervical screens in a lifetime
Women may only need three cervical screens in their lifetime if they have been given the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, according to a new study by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL). The Cancer Research UK-funded team found that three screens at 30, 40 and 55 would offer the same benefit to vaccinated women as the 12 lifetime screens currently offered in England.

Social Sciences - 10.11
Study highlights how community violence fosters antisocial behaviour in kids
Study highlights how community violence fosters antisocial behaviour in kids
Children and adolescents who are regularly confronted with violence in their communities have a greater tendency to show antisocial behaviour according to the authors of a new study published in the journal Frontiers of Behavioral Neuroscience .

Sport Sciences - 10.11
Biobanding evaluation nets positive results among academy football teams
Biobanding evaluation nets positive results among academy football teams
Matching young players according to their developmental or biological age, as opposed to their chronological age, has positive effects in terms of performance, talent identification and injury reduction in football, according to a new significant new study.

Chemistry - Medicine/Pharmacology - 9.11
Fatty molecule in human blood controls malaria parasites’ decision to leap to mosquitoes
Fatty molecule in human blood controls malaria parasites' decision to leap to mo
Depletion of a fatty molecule in human blood propels malaria parasites to stop replicating and causing illness in people and instead to jump ship to mosquitoes to continue the transmission cycle, according to a new study by an international research team co-led by the University of Glasgow.

Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology - 9.11
New DNA antenatal screening for Down’s syndrome is a ’transformational advance’
New DNA antenatal screening for Down's syndrome is a 'transformational advance'
Scientists at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) have shown for the first time that it is possible to incorporate DNA analysis into antenatal screening for three serious chromosome disorders, including Down's syndrome, in a way that is far more accurate, and safer and less stressful for mothers.

Microtechnics/Electroengineering - 9.11
New method developed to 3D print fully functional electronic circuits
Researchers at the University of Nottingham have pioneered a breakthrough method to rapidly 3D print fully functional electronic circuits. The circuits, which contain electrically-conductive metallic inks and insulating polymeric inks, can now be produced in a single inkjet printing process where a UV light rapidly solidifies the inks.

Medicine/Pharmacology - 8.11
Breast cancer study suggests review of treatment length
A new study published in the New England Journal of Medicine , funded by Cancer Research UK, has found that the risk of breast cancer recurring persists undiminished for at least 20 years after diagnosis, suggesting that hormonal treatments should continue for even longer to reduce the risk of late recurrence.

Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology - 8.11
Tiny silicon probes provide high definition recording of brain activity
Tiny silicon probes provide high definition recording of brain activity
A team involving UCL scientists has developed a new device that could revolutionise our understanding of the brain by allowing researchers to map the activity of complex neural networks that control behaviour and decision making, in a way never before possible.

Life Sciences - Physics/Materials Science - 8.11
Height and weight evolved at different speeds in the bodies of our ancestors
Height and weight evolved at different speeds in the bodies of our ancestors
The largest study to date of body sizes over millions of years finds a "pulse and stasis" pattern to hominin evolution, with surges of growth in stature and bulk occurring at different times. At one stage, our ancestors got taller around a million years before body mass caught up.

Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology - 8.11
Sheep are able to recognise human faces from photographs
Sheep can be trained to recognise human faces from photographic portraits - and can even identify the picture of their handler without prior training - according to new research from scientists at the University of Cambridge.

Medicine/Pharmacology - Veterinary Science - 7.11
Current cattle injections increase the risk of injury, research finds
Research by experts at The University of Nottingham suggests that current injection techniques in UK dairy cattle need to change to avoid the risk of nerve injury. The study, carried out by a team of vets with anatomical, pathological and clinical expertise, discovered that current methods of injection are more likely to damage the sciatic nerve - particularly in dairy cattle with a low body condition score, such as those cows who have recently calved.

Environment/Sustainable Development - Microtechnics/Electroengineering - 6.11
Wallpaper bio-solar panel developed by researchers
Earth Sciences - Environment/Sustainable Development - 3.11
Atmospheric rivers could increase flood risk by 80 per cent
Life Sciences - Physics/Materials Science - 3.11
Scientists identify mechanism that helps us inhibit unwanted thoughts
Life Sciences - Environment/Sustainable Development - 2.11
New great ape species uncovered in Indonesia
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 2.11
Colon cancer breakthrough could lead to prevention
Environment/Sustainable Development - Life Sciences - 1.11
Life on the Edge
Life Sciences - Earth Sciences - 31.10
Aliens may be more like us than we think
Environment/Sustainable Development - Life Sciences - 30.10
The advent of "green” cattle
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology - 26.10
New device developed that can weigh a single cell
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology - 25.10
Skin found to play a role in controlling blood pressure
Environment/Sustainable Development - Business/Economics - 25.10
Global biodiversity conservation does save species, but could be done smarter
Environment/Sustainable Development - Administration/Government - 25.10
How 14 Billion Dollars Protected Earth’s Species
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology - 24.10
Self-esteem mapped in the human brain
Environment/Sustainable Development - Life Sciences - 23.10
Bees feast on fast food
Environment/Sustainable Development - 23.10
Sugarcane could help cut global carbon problem
Environment/Sustainable Development - Life Sciences - 23.10
Reduced impact logging still harms biodiversity in tropical rainforests
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 23.10
Dolphin brains show signs of Alzheimer’s Disease
Earth Sciences - Agronomy/Food Science - 23.10
Crops evolving ten millennia before experts thought
Earth Sciences - Life Sciences - 23.10
World’s oldest and most complex trees
Life Sciences - Environment/Sustainable Development - 20.10
British birds adapt their beaks to birdfeeders
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 19.10
Researchers target ’undruggable’ cancers
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 19.10
PET scans for Alzheimer’s could bring benefit to more patients
Physics/Materials Science - Life Sciences - 18.10
Petals produce a ’blue halo’ to help bees find flowers
Social Sciences - Sport Sciences - 18.10
Gentle touch soothes the pain of social rejection
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 18.10
Gene therapy can cure lameness in horses, research finds
Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 18.10
Exploring why some primates have bigger brains
Physics/Materials Science - Life Sciences - 18.10
Petals produce a ’blue halo’ that helps bees find flowers
Earth Sciences - Chemistry - 18.10
48-million-year-old wax discovered in a bird fossil
Environment/Sustainable Development - Earth Sciences - 17.10
Hardy corals take to the seas to build new reefs from scratch
Physics/Materials Science - Microtechnics/Electroengineering - 16.10
Nanoantenna arrays power a new generation of fluorescence-based sensors
Medicine/Pharmacology - Social Sciences - 12.10
Risk factors for heart health linked to marital ups and downs
Environment/Sustainable Development - Earth Sciences - 12.10
Rainfall trends in arid regions buck commonly held climate change theories
Computer Science/Telecom - Microtechnics/Electroengineering - 12.10
Humanoid robot tests to explore AI ethics
Life Sciences - Chemistry - 12.10
Dealing with disaster - when rooted to the spot
Medicine/Pharmacology - Psychology - 11.10
Sleep and mood in bipolar disorder
Religions - Social Sciences - 6.10
Religion and social factors top IVF concerns
Social Sciences - Religions - 6.10
Social factors top IVF concerns
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology - 2.10
Research shines light on circadian clock in our muscles
Life Sciences - Environment/Sustainable Development - 1.10
Meet the hominin species that gave us genital herpes
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 28.09
Tracking the body’s mini-shuttles
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 28.09
New typhoid vaccine offers hope of protection for children
Business/Economics - 28.09
Diversification benefits of commodities
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology - 27.09
Brain cells that control appetite identified for first time
Medicine/Pharmacology - Chemistry - 27.09
Researchers uncover the source of diabetic pain
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology - 21.09
Virtual reality tool developed to untangle genes
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology - 18.09
Cells programmed like computers to fight disease
Psychology - Medicine/Pharmacology - 15.09
Treating insomnia may reduce mental health problems
Life Sciences - 13.09
New way to control memory
Astronomy - Chemistry - 13.09
Inferno world with titanium skies
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 13.09
Study clears important hurdle towards developing an HIV vaccine
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology - 12.09
Explaining bursts of activity in preterm human brains
Physics/Materials Science - Earth Sciences - 12.09
Tectonic plates ’weaker than previously thought’, say scientists

 
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