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Social Sciences - 16.12.2016
My Marriage My Choice
A new study from The University of Nottingham will examine the issue of forced marriage among adults with learning disabilities. ‘ My Marriage My Choice ' is a two-year study which aims to improve understanding of the issue, as well as helping to develop policy and practice to support professionals in their work of safeguarding vulnerable children and adults.

Social Sciences - Health - 13.12.2016
System is failing to prevent deaths following police custody and prison, study suggests
System is failing to prevent deaths following police custody and prison, study suggests
Poor access to health care and confusion over post-detention care may have contributed to more than 400 deaths following police custody and prison detention since 2009, a new report has claimed.

Social Sciences - Health - 13.12.2016
Television volume can be festive flashpoint for Christmas viewers
For many households, crowding around the television for a family film or to watch the Queen's speech is as much of a Christmas tradition as opening presents and enjoying a turkey dinner. But in homes where one family member has a hearing aid, settling down to watch the box can become a festive flashpoint - leading to arguments about volume and tussles over the TV remote.

Social Sciences - Psychology - 12.12.2016
Yoga can have social benefits for children in care, says a new study
A new study from The University of Nottingham has found that a certain type of yoga could potentially help to improve the health and psychological wellbeing of children in care. The study, ‘ Kundalini Yoga as Mutual Recovery: A feasibility study including children in care and their carers ,' published at The Journal of Children's Services , found that the practice of Kundalini yoga in care homes, when both staff and children are involved, can lead to both individual and social benefits.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 31.10.2016
Twelve DNA areas ’linked with the age at which we have our first child and family size’
Researchers identify specific areas of DNA sequence that are related with the age at which we have our first child, and the total number of children we have during the course of our life. Researchers have identified 12 specific areas of the DNA sequence that are robustly related with the age at which we have our first child, and the total number of children we have during the course of our life.

Health - Social Sciences - 31.10.2016
Psychotropic medications may cut risk of violent reoffending
A study by the University of Oxford, looking at rates of violent re-offences among former prisoners in Sweden, has shown that prescribing psychotropic medications can cut the risk of violent reoffending. Prescribing ex-prisoners psychotropic medications after release is associated with a decrease in reoffending, according to a new study led by the University of Oxford.

Social Sciences - 28.10.2016
Other birds
[Embed: J is for Jay]   What species of birds do we use? Our researchers study social and physical cognition in corvids (members of the crow family, which includes jackdaws, rooks and jays), from studies of alliance formation and post-conflict behaviours in rooks, and food-sharing in jackdaws, to tests of what jays and rooks understand about tools.

Health - Social Sciences - 27.10.2016
Facebook updates could provide a window to understanding - and treating - mental health disorders
Our Facebook status updates, ‘likes' and even photos could help researchers better understand mental health disorders with the right ethical safeguards, argue researchers from the University of Cambridge, who suggest that social networks may even be used in future to provide support and interventions, particularly among young people.

Chemistry - Social Sciences - 25.10.2016
Workers and farmers find social sustainability gains in organic farming
Workers and farmers find social sustainability gains in organic farming
New research from the University of Bristol has found that embracing organic farming methods can bring gains in social sustainability, and benefits for farmers and workers. The study, by PhD candidate Lydia Medland, found workers in organic farming enjoy increased social sustainability of working conditions and relations.

Health - Social Sciences - 19.10.2016
Opinion: New findings: anxiety is linked to death from cancer in men
Opinion: New findings: anxiety is linked to death from cancer in men
Olivia Remes (Department of Public Health and Primary Care) discusses new research which suggests that generalised anxiety disorder is associated with a two times higher risk for cancer deaths - but only in men. About one in 14 people around the world are affected by anxiety disorders at any given time.

Social Sciences - Health - 14.10.2016
GPs need better training to help children affected by domestic violence
GPs need better training to help children affected by domestic violence
Although doctors and nurses are becoming more aware of patients experiencing domestic violence, the needs of children are often ignored, according to new research published today that reveals a lack of training about how to identify and support children exposed to domestic violence. Experts from the universities of Bristol and Central Lancashire say better training, coupled with improved information-sharing between agencies, could greatly improve outcomes for these children.

Social Sciences - Health - 10.10.2016
New study to tackle ADHD in young prisoners
A new study led by researchers from King's College London, the University of Edinburgh and Imperial College London, will investigate whether a drug called methylphenidate (MPH) reduces symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and antisocial behaviour in young male prisoners with the disorder.

Social Sciences - Philosophy - 05.10.2016
Being kind to others does make you ’slightly happier’
Researchers conclude that being kind to others causes a small but significant improvement in subjective well-being. The review found that the effect is lower than some pop-psychology articles have claimed, but also concluded that future research might help identify which kind acts are most effective at boosting happiness.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 04.10.2016
String pulling bees provide insight into spread of culture
String pulling bees provide insight into spread of culture
Bumblebees can learn to pull strings for food and pass on the ability to a colony, according to researchers at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL). Pulling strings to obtain food is an experiment often used to test the intelligence of apes and birds, but it is the first time this technique has been discovered in an insect.

Social Sciences - 22.09.2016
Tackling hate crime in Los Angeles
Experts from Cardiff University are developing a statistical tool that uses social media to make real-time predictions of where hate crimes may occur. The team, from the University's Social Data Science Lab, will be using Los Angeles County as a test bed for their study, thanks to over $800,000 in funding from the US Department of Justice.

Health - Social Sciences - 19.09.2016
Trial offers hope of a treatment for spinal muscular atrophy
Those with a taste for adult education classes have long known it, but now Oxford University scientists have confirmed that taking part in the weekly sessions can boost wellbeing - regardless of the subject studied.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 15.09.2016
For ants, 'elite' individuals are not always so effective
For ants, ’elite’ individuals are not always so effective
We all know that social insects, such as ants, often work together to achieve effective responses to environmental challenges. However, research by the University of Bristol, published in the Journal of Experimental Biology, has now uncovered that the contributions of different individuals within such groups vary.

Health - Social Sciences - 15.08.2016
Study probes link between prenatal paracetamol use and childhood behaviour problems
Study probes link between prenatal paracetamol use and childhood behaviour problems
Using the common pain-relieving medication acetaminophen - or paracetamol - during pregnancy is associated with increased risk for multiple behavioural problems in children, new research has found. Acetaminophen is generally considered safe in pregnancy, and is used by many pregnant women for pain and fever.

Social Sciences - Psychology - 03.08.2016
Sussex-led research explodes the myth of a West vs. Rest? cultural divide
Sussex-led research explodes the myth of a West vs. Rest? cultural divide
Sussex-led research explodes the myth of a 'West vs. Rest? cultural divide Cultural psychologists have long argued that people living in Western cultures show a rather distinctive pattern of self-beliefs, compared to those who live in other parts of the world. Westerners, it is claimed, are unusual in that they tend to see themselves as independent from others.

Social Sciences - Life Sciences - 27.07.2016
Orangutan gives clues to the origins of human speech
Orangutan gives clues to the origins of human speech
An orangutan called Rocky could provide the key to understanding how speech in humans evolved from the time of the ancestral great apes, according to a study led by Dr Adriano Lameira of Durham University and published in the journal Scientific Reports . Learned behaviour Dr Lameira , a Junior Research Fellow in the Department of Anthropology led a research project to look at whether an orangutan could demonstrate the ability to learn new sounds and control its voice.
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