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Pedagogy



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Life Sciences - Pedagogy - 14.10.2016
Toddlers' food fussiness is heavily influenced by genes
Toddlers’ food fussiness is heavily influenced by genes
Toddlers' fussy eating habits are mainly the result of genetic influences rather than the result of poor parenting, according to new research led by scientists at UCL. The research, published in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry , investigated to what extent genes and environmental factors can explain why some children tend to refuse to try new foods or are very selective about what foods they eat.

Health - Pedagogy - 03.10.2016
Motion tests suggest car seats not necessarily safe for infants
Motion tests suggest car seats not necessarily safe for infants
Newborn infants may be at risk of breathing difficulties if left in car safety seats for long periods, particularly when travelling, new research from the University of Bristol has shown. Most UK hospitals require premature infants to complete a ‘car seat challenge' before discharge. Infants are observed for breathing difficulties or changes in heart rate while in a car seat.

Pedagogy - 22.04.2016
Gender stereotyping may start as young as three months, study of babies' cries shows
Gender stereotyping may start as young as three months, study of babies’ cries shows
Gender stereotyping may start as young as three months, study of babies' cries shows Gender stereotyping may start as young as three months, according to a study of babies' cries from the University of Sussex. Adults attribute degrees of femininity and masculinity to babies based on the pitch of their cries, as shown by a new study by researchers from the University of Sussex, the University of Lyon/Saint-Etienne and Hunter College City University of New York.

Pedagogy - 11.04.2016
’Parents know best about effects of video games on children’
A study has found that parents who reported playing video games with their children are about three times more likely to have a handle on the effects gaming have on young people as compared with adults who are not parents and those who have never played.  The research by the University of Oxford and Cardiff University looks at how the actual experience of playing video games may affect people's attitudes on their benefits and potential harm.

Health - Pedagogy - 22.03.2016
Parental conflict damages children's mental health and life chances
Parental conflict damages children’s mental health and life chances
Parental conflict damages children's mental health and life chances Children's exposure to conflict between their parents - whether parents are together or separated - can put children's mental health and long-term life chances at risk, new research warns today (Tuesday 22 March). A review carried out by the Early Intervention Foundation ( EIF ) and Professor Gordon Harold , of the University of Sussex, for the Department for Work and Pensions found that children's wellbeing can be affected by the quality of the parental relationship.

Health - Pedagogy - 09.03.2016
Communication is key for clinicians when it comes to viral illness
Communication is key for clinicians when it comes to viral illness
Clinicians tend to use language that minimises the severity of viral illness in children with respiratory tract infections (RTIs), a new study has found. The University of Bristol study, funded by the Scientific Foundation Board of the Royal College of General Practitioners looked at communication between doctors and parents about antibiotic prescribing for children with cough.

Pedagogy - Health - 26.02.2016
Researchers aim to improve the use of antibiotics in primary care
Researchers aim to improve the use of antibiotics in primary care
New research led by Bristol NHS CCG and the University of Bristol, aimed at improving the quality of primary care for children with respiratory tract infections (RTIs) will be presented in London today. Carried out by the Centre for Academic Primary Care (CAPC) , the TARGET programme included the largest and most rigorous set of studies of their kind.

Health - Pedagogy - 10.02.2016
Parents over peers: new study shines light on teenage drinking and parental influence
A study of adolescents' drinking habits between the ages of 11 to 17 has found that the heaviest consumers of alcohol were teenagers who were under the lowest levels of parental control, and who were also the most secretive about their drinking.‌ Dr Mark McCann of the MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit at the University of Glasgow led the study, which is published today, working with researchers from Queen's University Belfast.