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Mechanical Engineering



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Mechanical Engineering - Health - 15.09.2016
Touchscreens may improve motor skills in toddlers
A new study by researchers from King's College London and Birkbeck, University of London, has found that toddlers who use touchscreens may show improved fine motor control abilities. The use of touchscreens has increased rapidly in recent years, with statistics showing that in the UK alone, the number of touchscreen devices in the family home has increased from 7 per cent in 2011 to 71 per cent in 2014.

Mechanical Engineering - Electroengineering - 05.08.2016
Shape-changing metamaterial developed using Kirigami technique
Shape-changing metamaterial developed using Kirigami technique
Engineers from the University of Bristol have developed a new shape-changing metamaterial using Kirigami, which is the ancient Japanese art of cutting and folding paper to obtain 3D shapes. Metamaterials are a class of material engineered to produce properties that don't occur naturally. Currently metamaterials are used to make artificial electromagnetic and vibration absorbers and high-performance sensors.

Law / Forensics - Mechanical Engineering - 21.07.2016
Leonardo da Vinci’s irrelevant? scribbles mark the spot where he first recorded the laws of friction
A new detailed study of notes and sketches by Leonardo da Vinci has identified a page of scribbles in a tiny notebook as the place where Leonardo first recorded the laws of friction.

Mechanical Engineering - Environment - 28.04.2016
Wind turbine study measures small effect on local climate
Wind turbine study measures small effect on local climate
Newly published research has shown that the action of wind turbines has a measurable effect on the local climate. Researchers from Lancaster University, the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, National Centre for Atmospheric Science, the University of Glasgow, and the University of Leeds placed a grid of more than 100 temperature and humidity sensors around wind turbines at ScottishPower Renewables' Black Law Wind Farm in North Lanarkshire.

Mechanical Engineering - Environment - 22.04.2016
Windfarms generate microclimates with uncertain effects on peatland carbon store
The microclimates created by the action of wind farms is unlikely to affect the ability of peatland to capture carbon, scientists consider. Previous studies by other researchers have established that wind farms do create localised microclimates, with slightly different temperatures and levels of humidity caused by the action of the turbine blades.

Mechanical Engineering - 09.02.2016
A fifth of car fuel-efficiency savings are eroded by increased driving
A fifth of car fuel-efficiency savings are eroded by increased driving
A fifth of car fuel-efficiency savings are eroded by increased driving Around a fifth of the energy-saving benefits of fuel-efficient cars are eroded because people end up driving them more, according to a study into British motoring habits over the last 40 years. Using data from 1970 to 2011, energy experts at the University of Sussex found a long-term ‘rebound effect' among British car-drivers of around 20 per cent.

Mechanical Engineering - Environment - 05.02.2016
Motorboat noise gives predators a deadly advantage
Motorboat noise gives predators a deadly advantage
The rate that fish are captured by predators can double when boats are motoring nearby, according to pioneering work led by the University of Exeter and co-authored by the University of Bristol, published today in Nature. Dr Stephen Simpson of Exeter's Biosciences department and an international research team, including Bristol's Dr Andy Radford , found that noise from passing motorboats increases stress levels in young coral reef fish and reduces their ability to flee from predators.

Physics - Mechanical Engineering - 18.01.2016
It's a 3D printer, but not as we know it
It’s a 3D printer, but not as we know it
3D printing techniques have quickly become some of the most widely used tools to rapidly design and build new components. A team of engineers at the University of Bristol has developed a new type of 3D printing that can print composite materials, which are used in many high performance products such as tennis rackets, golf clubs and aeroplanes.