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Results 81 - 100 of 1052.


Earth Sciences - Astronomy / Space Science - 23.11.2016
New hazard caused by volcanic eruptions discovered
New hazard caused by volcanic eruptions discovered
Scientists approach the broken, steaming ground around the Cordón Caulle vent, which was hugely uplifted during the 2011 eruption. Little of the slope seen behind the black lava flow would have been visible before the uplift occurred. Courtesy of Dr Hugh Tuffen. Research has identified, for the first time, a new type of hazard caused by explosive volcanic eruptions.

Life Sciences - Health - 23.11.2016
New imaging technique measures toxicity of proteins associated with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases
New imaging technique measures toxicity of proteins associated with Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases
A new super-resolution imaging technique allows researchers to track how surface changes in proteins are related to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. These proteins start out in a relatively harmless form, but when they clump together, something important changes.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 23.11.2016
Hurricane risk to Northeast USA coast increasing
Hurricane risk to Northeast USA coast increasing
The Northeastern coast of the USA could be struck by more frequent and more powerful hurricanes in the future due to shifting weather patterns, according to new research. Hurricanes have gradually moved northwards from the western Caribbean towards northern North America over the past few hundred years, the study led by Durham University, UK, found.

Life Sciences - Health - 22.11.2016
Salmonella disrupt the 'SAS' of the immune system
Salmonella disrupt the 'SAS’ of the immune system
Scientists have discovered that Salmonella causes disease by preventing deployment of the immune system's 'SAS'. When harmful bacteria invade our body, the immune system releases an elite force of cells to destroy the invader. Salmonella are sometimes able to overcome these ‘SAS' cells - called T-cells - but until now, scientists didn't know how.

Civil Engineering - Health - 22.11.2016
MRI successful new test for liver damage, say Nottingham experts
Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) could offer a new non-invasive test for liver damage that could transform the care of patients with cirrhosis, say experts in Nottingham. In a paper published in the Journal of Hepatology , the researchers from The University of Nottingham and Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust have demonstrated that MRI can be successfully used to estimate the pressure in the circulation of the liver.

Health - 22.11.2016
Coordinated approach essential to care after ICU and hospital discharge, new research finds
New research published today in the British Journal of General Practice has found inconsistencies in the experiences of patients once they were discharged from hospital, following admission to an intensive care unit (ICU), impacting detrimentally on the continuity of care they received. The team of researchers from King's College London ed a small group of patients, family members and GP staff.

Health - 22.11.2016
Reason for pancreatic cancer’s resistance to chemotherapy found
A pioneering University of Liverpool research team have published a study that identifies the mechanism in the human body that causes resistance of pancreatic cancer cells to chemotherapy. Pancreatic cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death and current therapies are not very effective. Thus, a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that impair the response of cancer patients to chemotherapy, the standard treatment of care for this disease, is essential to design more effective treatments for this lethal disease.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.11.2016
Around 600,000 in UK carry faulty gene that could lead to heart failure
Around 600,000 in UK carry faulty gene that could lead to heart failure
A new study from scientists at Imperial College London suggests a gene variant can trigger heart failure when the organ is under stress. The research showed that around one in 100 people carry a faulty gene which could trigger a dangerous heart condition in seemingly healthy people, if the heart is placed under abnormal stress, such as through pregnancy or high blood pressure.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.11.2016
Reconditioning the brain to overcome fear
Reconditioning the brain to overcome fear
Researchers have discovered a way to remove specific fears from the brain, using a combination of artificial intelligence and brain scanning technology. Their technique could lead to a new way of treating patients with conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and phobias. The challenge then was to find a way to reduce or remove the fear memory, without ever consciously evoking it Ben Seymour Fear related disorders affect around one in 14 people and place considerable pressure on mental health services.

Health - Mathematics - 21.11.2016
Research project hopes to improve outcomes for unborn twins sharing the same placenta
Research project hopes to improve outcomes for unborn twins sharing the same placenta
A unique two-year research project to better identify the cardiac function of monochorionic twins with twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) has been unveiled by St Michael's Hospital and Bristol's Clinical Research and Imaging Centre (CRICBristol) today [Thursday 17 November]. Funded by The Capella Foundation , a charity that helps increase awareness of medical complications during pregnancy, the project will seek to find out how the syndrome develops and identify ways to improve survival outcomes.

History / Archeology - Environment - 21.11.2016
Rice farming in India much older than thought, used as 'summer crop' by Indus civilisation
Rice farming in India much older than thought, used as ’summer crop’ by Indus civilisation
Thought to have arrived from China in 2000 BC, latest research shows domesticated rice agriculture in India and Pakistan existed centuries earlier, and suggests systems of seasonal crop variation that would have provided a rich and diverse diet for the Bronze Age residents of the Indus valley.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 18.11.2016
Scientist contributes to dinosaur extinction impact site study
An international team of scientists have shown how a massive crater caused by the impact of the asteroid which killed the dinosaurs also deformed rocks in a way that may have produced habitats for early life. Around 65 million years ago, a massive asteroid crashed into the Gulf of Mexico causing an impact so huge that the blast and subsequent knock-on effects wiped out around 75 per cent of all life on Earth, including most of the dinosaurs.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 17.11.2016
Asteroid impacts could create niches for life, suggests Chicxulub crater study
Asteroid impacts could create niches for life, suggests Chicxulub crater study
Scientists studying the Chicxulub crater have shown how large asteroid impacts deform rocks in a way that may produce habitats for early life. Around 65 million years ago a massive asteroid crashed into the Gulf of Mexico causing an impact so huge that the blast and subsequent knock-on effects wiped out around 75 per cent of all life on Earth, including most of the dinosaurs.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.11.2016
A BLUEPRINT for blood cells: Cambridge researchers play leading role in major release of epigenetic studies
A BLUEPRINT for blood cells: Cambridge researchers play leading role in major release of epigenetic studies
Cambridge researchers have played a leading role in several studies released today looking at how variation in and potentially heritable changes to our DNA, known as epigenetic modifications, affect blood and immune cells, and how this can lead to disease.

Life Sciences - 17.11.2016
Photosynthesis breakthrough could boost food crops
Photosynthesis breakthrough could boost food crops
Researchers have increased plant productivity by boosting levels of three proteins involved in photosynthesis, according to a new study . Researchers have increased plant productivity by boosting levels of three proteins involved in photosynthesis, according to a new study . In field trials, the scientists saw 14 to 20 percent increases in the productivity of their modified tobacco plants.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.11.2016
Virologists unravel mystery of late C20th gibbon leukaemia outbreak
The mystery of an outbreak of lymphoma and leukaemia in gibbon colonies in the US, Bermuda and Thailand in the late 1960s and early 1970s has been solved by animal disease detectives at The University of Nottingham. The virology experts from the University's Vet School have carried out an investigation into the cancer outbreak which was caused by the gibbon ape leukaemia retrovirus (GALV).

Life Sciences - Health - 17.11.2016
Cannabis blunts the brain's reward system
Cannabis blunts the brain’s reward system
Regular cannabis use over many years lowers levels of dopamine, which plays a key role in how the brain processes motivation, pleasure and reward. This can reduce motivation and inducenegative emotions, which may help to explain why cannabis is associated with mental illness. In a review of the state of current research published in the journal Nature , scientists examined the action of dopamine through detailed analysis of multiple studies involving brain scans of long-term cannabis users.

Chemistry - Health - 17.11.2016
Researchers create synthetic skin
Researchers create synthetic skin
Wearable technologies could be transformed with a new type of artificial material that can mimic the properties of skin from sensing touch to even being self-healing.     Thursday 17 November 2016 It is thought that the device could be used in prosthetics, which would improve on current designs that are heavy, easily damaged and cause difficulty in sensing touch in the wearer.

Astronomy / Space Science - 17.11.2016
Saturn's gravity uncovered by satellite images
Saturn’s gravity uncovered by satellite images
Scientists from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) are part of an international team that has discovered minute fluctuations in Saturn's gravitational field using several thousand images of the planet's moons obtained by the Cassini probe.     Thursday 17 November 2016 The results help provide a better understanding of the internal structure of the planet, and hopefully answer the question of what lies at the centre of Saturn - whether it has a large rocky core or if its density is much lower.

Physics - Administration - 16.11.2016
Researchers present quantum technologies at major showcase
Researchers present quantum technologies at major showcase
Members of Bristol's Centre for Quantum Photonics presented their latest demonstrations to industry leaders, funding bodies and government representatives at this year's Quantum Showcase in London. The researchers occupied three stands in the exhibition space at the QEII Centre in Westminster, at an event attended by industry, government and funding bodies.