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Results 101 - 120 of 1142.


Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 30.11.2015
Cassini mission provides insight into Saturn
Cassini mission provides insight into Saturn
Scientists have found the first direct evidence for explosive releases of energy in Saturn's magnetic bubble using data from the Cassini spacecraft, a joint mission between NASA, the European Space Agency, and the Italian Space Agency. The research is reported . These “explosions” are produced in a process known as magnetic reconnection, something well studied at Earth and is an important part of Space Weather, involved in energising the radiation belts and producing displays of the Northern lights.

Art and Design - Psychology - 30.11.2015
Opinion: What your musical taste says about your personality
David Greenberg (Department of Psychology) discusses how musical preferences are linked to thinking styles. We're exposed to music for nearly 20% of our waking lives. But much of our musical experience seems to be a mystery.

Health - 30.11.2015
Targeting HIV ’reservoir’ could be first step to understanding how to cure the disease
A new clinical trial will test whether it is possible to destroy hidden reservoirs of HIV virus that are a key obstacle to curing the disease. The RIVER trial is one of the first clinical trials to test a new idea of how to cure HIV. As well as standard HIV treatment, it includes different medicines that wake-up a 'reservoir' of infected cells that have sleeping virus inside them and kills them using the body's own immune system.

Health - 30.11.2015
Turbulence created by powerful aircraft engines visualised by Imperial team
Turbulence created by powerful aircraft engines visualised by Imperial team
Researchers are attempting to reduce aircraft noise, by creating pictures of how air is forced through engines when planes are in flight. Noise pollution from aircraft is a global policy and health issue. In fact, scientist from Imperial have previously found that risks of hospital admissions and deaths from stroke and heart disease were around 10 to 20 per cent higher in areas with highest levels of aircraft noise , compared with the areas with least noise.

Health - Physics - 28.11.2015
Scientists offer sweet solution to marathon fatigue
Scientists offer sweet solution to marathon fatigue
It turns out a spoonful of sugar might not just help the medicine go down, but could also help stave off tiredness faced by weary marathon runners - or other long-distance athletes - when they hit the wall. According to researchers based within our Department for Health , stirring in table sugar from the baking cupboard into a water bottle before a big physical event could be the difference between success and failure.

Environment - Mechanical Engineering - 27.11.2015
Earth's first ecosystems were more complex than previously thought, study finds
Earth’s first ecosystems were more complex than previously thought, study finds
Computer simulations have allowed scientists to work out how a puzzling 555-million-year-old organism with no known modern relatives fed, revealing that some of the first large, complex organisms on Earth formed ecosystems that were much more complex than previously thought. The international team of researchers from Canada, the UK and the USA, including Dr Imran Rahman from the University of Bristol, studied fossils of an extinct organism called Tribrachidium , which lived in the oceans some 555 million years ago.

Life Sciences - Health - 27.11.2015
Discovered: A cluster of 60 proteins that help cells move and feel
Discovered: A cluster of 60 proteins that help cells move and feel
We welcome your feedback Please help us improve The University of Manchester website by completing a short questionnaire at the end of your visit. Yes, I'll give feedback No, thanks University of Manchester scientists have discovered a cluster of 60 proteins that allow the body's cells to react to their environment and communicate with each other.

Health - Mechanical Engineering - 27.11.2015
Cholesterol-lowering statins could help tackle breast cancer
Cholesterol-lowering statins could help tackle breast cancer
A new study by researchers from Imperial College London suggests statins could help fight hard-to-treat cancers. The research, published today , reveals that tumours rely heavily on cholesterol for growth. Cholesterol-lowering statins - which are currently prescribed to around 30 million people worldwide, can block this supply - causing it to ‘starve' and die.

Life Sciences - Health - 27.11.2015
White matter damage caused by 'skunk-like' cannabis
Smoking high potency ‘skunk-like' cannabis can damage a crucial part of the brain responsible for communication between the two brain hemispheres, according to a new study by scientists from King's College London and Sapienza University of Rome. Researchers have known for some time that long-term cannabis use increases the risk of psychosis, and recent evidence suggests that alterations in brain function and structure may be responsible for this greater vulnerability.

Health - Innovation / Technology - 27.11.2015
New grants for pancreatic cancer research
Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) has received new grants from Pancreatic Cancer UK (PCUK) to fund five projects that aim to improve treatment options for pancreatic cancer patients. Pancreatic cancer is the fifth most common cause of cancer deaths but receives only 1.4 per cent of the total cancer research spend in the UK.

Health - Social Sciences - 27.11.2015
CBT can help overcome fear of the dentist
Cognitive behavioural therapy could help many people with a dental phobia overcome their fear of visiting the dentist and enable them to receive dental treatment without the need to be sedated, according to a new study by King's College London. Anxiety about visiting the dentist is common and becomes a phobia when it has a marked impact on someone's well-being; people with dental phobias typically avoid going to the dentist and end up experiencing more dental pain, poorer oral health and a detrimental effect on their quality of life.

Astronomy / Space Science - 26.11.2015
How to escape a black hole
An international team of astrophysicists, including researchers from the University of Cambridge, has observed a new way for gas to escape the gravitational pull of a supermassive black hole. These jets are a unique tool for probing supermassive black holes Morgan Fraser The results are based on new radio observations tracking a star as it gets torn apart by a black hole.

Health - Social Sciences - 26.11.2015
Two-thirds of studies on ’psychosocial’ treatments fail to declare conflicts of interest
The creators of commercially sold counselling programmes increasingly profit from public health services across the world. However, a new study into the evidence basis for some of the market leaders reveals that serious conflicts of interest across the majority of the research go habitually undisclosed.

Life Sciences - Health - 26.11.2015
Moonlighting molecules: finding new uses for old enzymes
A collaboration between the University of Cambridge and MedImmune, the global biologics research and development arm of AstraZeneca, has led researchers to identify a potentially significant new application for a well-known human enzyme, which may have implications for treating respiratory diseases such as asthma.

Health - Life Sciences - 26.11.2015
New strategy discovered for treating arthritis
Arthritis patients could one day benefit from a novel form of medicine, according to researchers at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL). Their early study indicates that arthritic cartilage, previously thought to be impenetrable to therapies, could be treated by a patient's own ‘microvesicles' that are able to travel into cartilage cells and deliver therapeutic agents.

History / Archeology - Health - 25.11.2015
Progesterone supplements do not improve outcomes for women with a history of recurrent miscarriages
New research from the University of Birmingham has shown that progesterone supplements in the first trimester of pregnancy do not improve outcomes in women with a history of unexplained recurrent miscarriages. The findings, published today in The New England Journal of Medicine , mark the end of a five year trial and provide a definitive answer to 60 years of uncertainty on the use of progesterone treatment for women with unexplained recurrent losses.

Life Sciences - 25.11.2015
At the edge of vision: Struggling to make sense of our cluttered world
As you're driving to work along a busy road, your eyes on the traffic lights ahead, hoping they won't turn to red, you pass signs warning of roadworks, ads on bus shelters... Suddenly a dog runs out in front of you.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 25.11.2015
Comment: Explainer: why daydreaming is good for you
Giulia Poerio, PhD student at the University of Sheffield's Department of Psychology, explains why daydreaming is good for you. Explainer: why daydreaming is good for you By Giulia Poerio, 25 November 2015, posted on The Conversation Most people think of rest as the times when we stop work or movement in order to relax, sleep, or recover strength.

Life Sciences - 25.11.2015
Pigeons must feel the need for speed if they want to lead
Many birds travel in flocks, sometimes migrating over thousands of miles. But how do the birds decide who will lead the way? Researchers at Oxford University, reporting in the journal Current Biology , can offer new insight based on studies in homing pigeons. For pigeons, it seems, leadership is largely a question of speed.

Life Sciences - 25.11.2015
Winter season reverses outcome of fruit fly reproduction
Winter season reverses outcome of fruit fly reproduction
Male fruit flies could find their chances of fathering offspring radically reduced if they are last in the queue to mate with promiscuous females before winter arrives, according to new University of Liverpool research. Usually, when female flies mate with multiple males, the last male fathers most of the offspring, with several other males fathering the rest.