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Health - Business / Economics - 19.12.2012
The drugs don’t work
The drugs don’t work
Health Technology Assessment is not 'pure science'. The drug industry is a key actor in the process of issuing recommendations" —Professor Larry King King and colleagues Piotr Ozieranski (University of Leicester) and Martin McKee (London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine) found that multinational drug companies are deploying their massive financial resources to capture stakeholders at every stage of the process for the scientific recommendation of drugs in Poland.

Business / Economics - Mechanical Engineering - 05.12.2012
The detectives of corrosion
Corrosion costs the oil and gas industry billions of dollars every year, it can also have far reaching environmental consequences. But so far no one has managed to stop corrosion happening. A detective style research team based at The University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus are working closely with industry to investigate real world problems and are taking a forensic look at the nature of corrosion — particularly in the oil and gas sector.

Business / Economics - 20.11.2012
Evidence of ’mid-life’ crisis in Great Apes
Chimpanzees and orangutans can experience a mid-life crisis just like humans, a study suggests. This is the finding from a new study that set out to test the theory that the pattern of human well-being over a lifespan might have evolved in the common ancestors of humans and great apes.

Business / Economics - Continuing Education - 14.11.2012
How honest are you at work?
A new study has revealed we are basically honest. The research by the University of Oxford and the University of Bonn suggests that it pains us to tell lies, particularly when we are in our own homes. It appears that being honest is hugely important to our sense of who we are. However, while it might bother us to tell lies at home, we are more likely to bend the truth at work, suggests the study.

Health - Business / Economics - 08.11.2012
Financial incentives may improve hospital mortality rates, says study
Financial incentives may improve hospital mortality rates, says study
A "significant” fall in mortality rates for certain conditions emerged in a study into the use of incentives at hospitals in the North West of England. Economists and health experts from the Universities of Manchester, Nottingham, Birmingham and Cambridge examined how the introduction of a scheme that paid bonuses to hospitals based on measures of quality affected the delivery of care.

Health - Business / Economics - 07.11.2012
Financial incentives may improve hospital mortality rates, says study
PA 309/12 New research into controversial pay-for-performance schemes has suggested they may help to save the lives of NHS patients. A ‘significant' fall in mortality rates for certain conditions emerged in a study by health experts and economists from the Universities of Nottingham, Manchester, Cambridge and Birmingham into the use of incentives at hospitals in the North West of England.

Careers / Employment - Business / Economics - 05.11.2012
Hidden cyberbullying is as common as conventional counterpart in the workplace
Hidden cyberbullying is as common as conventional counterpart in the workplace
Cyberbullying through e-mail, text and web posts is as common in the workplace as conventional bullying but even more difficult to uncover, research by experts from the University of Sheffield has revealed. Occupational psychologists Christine Sprigg, Carolyn Axtell and Sam Farley of the University of Sheffield, together with Iain Coyne of the University of Nottingham, turned the focus of their investigation onto cyberbullying of adult workers, instead of younger people in schools, for which more research has taken place.

Business / Economics - Careers / Employment - 03.11.2012
Punched from the Screen - workplace cyber bullying becoming more widespread
Punched from the Screen - workplace cyber bullying becoming more widespread
Cyber bullying - using modern such as e-mails, texts or web-postings - is as common in the workplace as ‘conventional' bullying. Yet, the way cyber bullying influences both the victim and witnesses is more hidden in the workplace. These are the findings of ‘Punched from the Screen' - new research into workplace bullying carried out by occupational psychologists at The University of Nottingham and the University of Sheffield.

Business / Economics - Computer Science / Telecom - 02.11.2012
World's largest study to date into computer-based financial trading reveals beneficial effects but warns of systemic risks
World’s largest study to date into computer-based financial trading reveals beneficial effects but warns of systemic risks
A new Government research project , undertaken by an international team of researchers including experts from the University of Bristol, into the advantages and risks of computer-based trading in financial markets has shown it to have beneficial effects but warned of the risks of greater instability.

Continuing Education - Business / Economics - 01.11.2012
Puberty classes drive up attendance in African schoolgirls
Puberty classes drive up attendance in African schoolgirls
An Oxford University pilot study, published in the journal PLoS One , shows that providing free sanitary pads to teenage girls in Ghana markedly improved attendance levels at school over just three months. More surprisingly perhaps, the attendance levels of girls who did not get free pads but had lessons on puberty also improved by the same rate over a slightly longer period of five months.

Business / Economics - 05.10.2012
UCL Discovery downloads surpass 2m
The total number of papers, reports and PhD dissertations downloaded from UCL Discovery , the university's Open Access repository, surpassed 2,000,000 during September 2012. UCL Discovery, the UK repository with the largest number of records, contains nearly 14,274 records with access to full text; the 2,000,000th to be downloaded was by Professor Richard Blundell (UCL Economics): Labor Supply Models: Unobserved heterogeneity, nonparticipation and dynamics.

Business / Economics - Health - 02.10.2012
Regulation of junk food advertising has minimal impact
Regulation of junk food advertising has minimal impact
Researchers at the University of Liverpool have found that regulations introduced to reduce children's exposure to junk food advertising have not had a significant impact.

Health - Business / Economics - 07.09.2012
Universal health coverage improves health for all
Universal health coverage improves health for all
Evidence suggests that progress towards universal health coverage generally results in substantial improvements to population health, according to a new paper from researchers at Imperial College London. The issues surrounding universal health coverage - how an adequate standard of healthcare can be provided to all people, while ensuring that use of health services does not expose people to financial hardship - have never been more controversial or politically relevant than now.

Social Sciences - Business / Economics - 21.08.2012
Are East Europeans victims of racism in the UK?
Are East Europeans victims of racism in the UK?
Since 2004, nearly 1.9 million East Europeans have come to the UK1 .   New research, led by academics at the University of Bristol, has examined how current East European migration to the UK has been racialised in immigration policy and tabloid journalism, providing the first insights into how racism is affecting migrants' experiences of work and life in the UK.

Business / Economics - Administration - 21.08.2012
Flood risk ranking reveals vulnerable cities
A new study of nine coastal cities around the world suggests that Shanghai is most vulnerable to serious flooding. European cities top the leader board for their resilience. These finding are based on a new method to calculate the flood vulnerability of cities, developed by a team of researchers from the Netherlands and the University of Leeds.

Business / Economics - 16.08.2012
Lost letter experiment suggests wealthy London neighbourhoods are 'more altruistic'
Lost letter experiment suggests wealthy London neighbourhoods are ’more altruistic’
Neighbourhood income deprivation has a strong negative effect on altruistic behaviour when measured by a 'lost letter' experiment, according to new UCL research published today in PLoS One. Researchers from UCL Anthropology used the lost letter technique to measure altruism across 20 London neighbourhoods by dropping 300 letters on the pavement and recording whether they arrived at their destination.

Social Sciences - Business / Economics - 15.08.2012
UK recession may be to blame for 1,000 suicides in the UK
Research at the University of Liverpool has found that more than 1,000 people committed suicide due to the 2008-2010 economic recession in the UK. Suicides began to rise in the UK in 2008 following 20 years of decline – figures rose 8% among men and 9% among women in 2008, compared to 2007. And even though suicides did begin to fall in 2010 figures were still above the 2007 averages.

Health - Business / Economics - 30.07.2012
Drug prescribing system could boost patient safety
Research led by the University of Birmingham has shown that a specialised drug prescribing system could help to prevent a repetition of the notorious 2002 killings of elderly patients by nurse Colin Norris. A nurse at the Leeds General Infirmary and St James Hospitals, Norris was convicted in 2008 of murdering four patients using insulin, which lowered their blood glucose levels and led to their deaths.

Mechanical Engineering - Business / Economics - 20.07.2012
Former drivers help F1 teams get podium positions
Formula One teams are more likely to cross the finish line first if their boss is a former F1 driver, according to new research conducted by the University of Sheffield and the Cass Business School. The pioneering study shows putting money on teams like Red Bull and Sauber, which are headed by experts not general managers, is a wise move as former drivers and mechanics win twice as often as other types of F1 leaders.

Business / Economics - 19.07.2012
Polish entrepreneurship in Britain contributes to economic growth
Birmingham researcher shows net value of Polish entrepreneurship to the West Midlands economy A major new study of Polish migrants coming to the UK, shows that their business adds significant value to the economy of the West Midlands. The study also shows the huge diversity of businesses that this group of migrants has become involved with, moving beyond the stereotypes of construction.