news 2012


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Results 81 - 100 of 877.


Health - 26.11.2012
Research may explain why some people with schizophrenia do not respond to treatment
New research suggests that the molecular mechanism leading to schizophrenia may be different in patients who fail to respond to anti-psychotic medication compared to patients who do respond. The research, from King's College London's Institute of Psychiatry may help explain why up to one third of patients with schizophrenia do not respond to traditional anti-psychotic medication.

Health - Life Sciences - 26.11.2012
Funding for Studies into Tumours of the Nervous System
A research team from Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry has received grants amounting to over 400,000 from the Medical Research Council and Cancer Research UK to investigate why the mechanisms that suppress the growth and multiplication of tumours in the brain and nervous system do not work in some people, and to show how a new drug could be used as an alternative treatment to surgery.

Health - Life Sciences - 23.11.2012
Offering a reward can improve visual awareness in stroke patients
Offering a reward can improve visual awareness in stroke patients
Stroke patients who have difficulty paying attention to part of their visual field may perform better when offered a reward, a study by Imperial College London and Brunel University researchers has found. Between a third and half of stroke patients suffer from spatial neglect - a disorder of visual attention that means they do not notice objects on one side of their field of view.

Life Sciences - Health - 23.11.2012
875,000 to investigate protein that could hold the key to reversing the effects of heart failure
875,000 to investigate protein that could hold the key to reversing the effects of heart failure
A pioneering study that aims to investigate if a key protein, which is thought to be responsible for regulating the structure and function of the cells that cause contraction of the heart, can be manipulated to inhibit or reverse the effects of aging and heart failure will begin shortly thanks to funding of 875,000 from the British Heart Foundation (BHF) .

Health - 23.11.2012
Itching can have a visual trigger, new research reveals
Itching can have a visual trigger, new research reveals
Researchers from The University of Manchester and Liverpool John Moores University (LJMU) say their findings – published in the British Journal of Dermatology – could be of benefit to patients with skin conditions like eczema. The team tested whether visual cues could generate feelings of itch and provoke a scratch response.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.11.2012
Could fruit help to improve vascular health?
Scientists at the University of Warwick and consumer goods manufacturer Unilever are joining forces to identify whether the nutrients in everyday fruit and vegetables could help to improve people's cardiovascular health and protect them from Type-2 diabetes. The research collaboration has been set up to better understand if the nutrients and bioactives in fruits like grapes, strawberries and olives - in the right combination - could have a greater impact on people's heart and vascular health.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.11.2012
Scientists report a potential new treatment to prevent strokes
Scientists may have discovered a new way to prevent strokes in high risk patients, according to a new research. The group, from the University of Warwick and University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire (UHCW), is using ultrasound scanning to look at patients with carotid artery disease, one of the major causes of stroke.

Astronomy / Space Science - 22.11.2012
Astrophysicists show that dwarf planet Makemake has no atmosphere
A global team of scientists have observed the dwarf planet Makemake, 5000 million miles away, as it drifted in front of a distant star and blocked its light. The new observations have allowed them to check for the first time whether Makemake is surrounded by an atmosphere. This chilly world has an orbit lying in the outer Solar System and was expected to have an atmosphere like Pluto, but this is now shown not to be the case.

Health - 22.11.2012
Adults with ADHD commit fewer crimes when on medication
Criminal behaviour is lower in people with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) when they are on medication for the condition, a Swedish study has found. Oxford University psychiatrist and Wellcome Trust Senior Research Fellow Seena Fazel, a coauthor on the study, says: 'Our findings suggest a consistent, reasonably strong effect on criminality.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.11.2012
Fetuses yawn in the womb, according to new research
Fetuses yawn in the womb, according to new research
We know that unborn babies hiccup, swallow and stretch in the womb but new observational research concludes that they also yawn. The 4D scans of 15 healthy fetuses, by Durham and Lancaster Universities, also suggest that yawning is a developmental process which could potentially give doctors another index of a fetus' health.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.11.2012
Drugs could provide new treatment for epilepsy
Drugs could provide new treatment for epilepsy
New drugs derived from components of a specific diet used by children with severe, drug-resistant epilepsy could offer a new treatment, according to research published today in the journal Neuropharmacology. Scientists from UCL and Royal Holloway have identified specific fatty acids that have potent antiepileptic effects, which could help control seizures in children and adults.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.11.2012
Human gut nurtures 'good' bugs
Human gut nurtures 'good' bugs
Animals, including humans, actively select the gut microbes that are the best partners and nurture them with nutritious secretions, a new Oxford University study suggests. The Oxford team created an evolutionary computer model of interactions between gut microbes and the lining (the host epithelial cell layer) of the animal gut.

Psychology - 20.11.2012
Happy youngsters more likely to grow into wealthy adults, study finds
Happy youngsters more likely to grow into wealthy adults, study finds
The first in-depth investigation of whether youthful happiness leads to greater wealth in later life reveals that, even allowing for other influences, happy adolescents are likely to earn more money as adults. Jan-Emmanuel De Neve (UCL Political Science) and Andrew Oswald (University of Warwick) analysed data from 15,000 adolescents and young adults in the USA, finding that those who report higher 'positive affect', which is a technical measure of happiness, or higher 'life satisfaction' grow up to earn significantly higher levels of income later in life.

Life Sciences - Environment - 20.11.2012
Seals gamble with their pups’ futures
Some grey seal mums adopt risky tactics when it comes to the future of their young, a strategy that can give their pup a real advantage, according to scientists. Researchers from Durham University and the University of St Andrews, looking at grey seal colonies in Scotland, found that some seal mothers are flexible in the parenting style they adopt and 'gamble' on the outcome of their actions, whilst other play it safe and steady.

Business / Economics - 20.11.2012
Evidence of ’mid-life’ crisis in Great Apes
Chimpanzees and orangutans can experience a mid-life crisis just like humans, a study suggests. This is the finding from a new study that set out to test the theory that the pattern of human well-being over a lifespan might have evolved in the common ancestors of humans and great apes.

Physics - Life Sciences - 20.11.2012
Nanoscale ’rainbows’ could lead to improved solar cells and TV screens
New research at King's College London may lead to improved solar cells and LED-displays. Researchers from the Biophysics and Nanotechnology Group at King's, led by Anatoly Zayats in the Department of Physics have demonstrated in detail how to separate colours and create ‘rainbows' using nanoscale structures on a metal surface.

Chemistry - Physics - 20.11.2012
Researchers improve technology to detect hazardous chemicals
Researchers improve technology to detect hazardous chemicals
Scientists at Imperial College London have developed a system to quickly detect trace amounts of chemicals like pollutants, explosives or illegal drugs. The new system can pick out a single target molecule from 10 000 trillion water molecules within milliseconds, by trapping it on a self-assembling single layer of gold nanoparticles.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.11.2012
First randomised controlled trial to show spinal cord regeneration in dogs
First randomised controlled trial to show spinal cord regeneration in dogs
Our findings are extremely exciting because they show for the first time that transplanting these types of cell into a severely damaged spinal cord can bring about significant improvement." —Robin Franklin In a collaboration between the University's Veterinary School and MRC's Regenerative Medicine Centre, scientists used a unique type of cell to regenerate the damaged part of the dogs' spines.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.11.2012
Smartphones and high-tech labs to reveal health effects of pollutants
Smartphones and high-tech labs to reveal health effects of pollutants
New technologies for sensing chemicals that people are exposed to and their effects in the body will help scientists work towards a complete picture of how environmental pollutants influence health in a major EU initiative being launched today. Researchers will use smartphones equipped with GPS and environmental sensors to monitor potential hazards that study participants are exposed to.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 19.11.2012
University establishes Europe's first tall tower greenhouse gas measurements network
University establishes Europe’s first tall tower greenhouse gas measurements network
A network of integrated greenhouse gas measurements in the UK and Ireland - the first of its kind in Europe - has been established by researchers at the University of Bristol. A network of integrated greenhouse gas measurements in the UK and Ireland - the first of its kind in Europe - has been established by researchers at the University of Bristol.