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Results 61 - 80 of 391.


Health - 16.05.2019
Provost named among Nation's Lifesavers
Provost named among Nation’s Lifesavers
A researcher from the University of Sussex has today been recognised for his exceptional contribution to the nation's wellbeing. Professor Saul Becker , the University's Provost and world-leading expert in young carers has been named one of the Nation's Lifesavers - the top 100 individuals or groups based in universities whose work is saving lives and making a life-changing difference to our health and wellbeing.

Business / Economics - 16.05.2019
Most deprived communities are left behind
16 May 2019 As the UK heads towards a cashless society, experts have warned changes to infrastructure - including easy access to free ATMs - are leaving some of the most deprived communities behind. New research from the University of Bristol's Personal Finance Research Centre shows deprived neighbourhoods, often those where people are most likely to rely on cash, are rapidly witnessing the disappearance of their free cashpoints.

Linguistics / Literature - 16.05.2019
Bristol academic publishes solution to Voynich mystery
Bristol academic publishes solution to Voynich mystery
A University of Bristol academic appears to have succeeded where countless cryptographers, linguistics scholars and computer programs have failed - by cracking the code of the 'world's most mysterious text', the Voynich manuscript. Although the purpose and meaning of the manuscript had eluded scholars for over a century, it took Research Associate Dr. Gerard Cheshire two weeks, using a combination of lateral thinking and ingenuity, to identify the language and writing system of the famously inscrutable document.

Pharmacology - Health - 14.05.2019
Decoy antibiotics could get around bacteria's defences
Decoy antibiotics could get around bacteria’s defences
Imperial medical students have helped to devise a new type of 'decoy' drug to tackle infections that are resistant to antibiotics. In tests with cell cultures, the new drug successfully killed a strain of drug-resistant bacteria. It works by delivering two antibiotics, one of which is effectively hidden.

Health - 14.05.2019
New approach could improve heart attack care across Scotland
MSPs will tonight (Tuesday 14 May 2019) hear from University of Glasgow researchers how patients with life-threatening heart problems could benefit from a new approach to tracking treatments and outcomes throughout their care. An e-Registry of electronic health records has already helped Cardiologists bring together six care pathways for heart attack patients in the NHS.

Pedagogy - 13.05.2019
What happens when your picky toddler becomes a teen?
Toddlers who are picky about their food are not deficient in essential nutrients compared to their peers when they are teenagers. However, the few children who were persistent picky eaters, those who were less able to change and adapt their eating habits, showed pronounced differences in food intake at the age of 13, including a higher intake of sugar, according to new research published in Nutrition.

Life Sciences - 10.05.2019
Dietary fats entering the brain may explain link between obesity and depression
Obesity and depression have long been linked, with previous clinical studies finding an association between these two conditions. However, until now, the mechanisms of how obesity affects depression and vice versa have not been fully understood. Now, in a new study led by the University of Glasgow in collaboration with the Gladstone Institutes, and published today in Translational Psychiatry , scientists have been able to demonstrate the links between the consumption of diets high in saturated fats that lead to obesity and the development of depression phenotypes.

Health - Pharmacology - 09.05.2019
Smart design could prevent drug resistance in new malaria treatments
Smart design could prevent drug resistance in new malaria treatments
Researchers have overcome malaria parasites' resistance to potential new drugs by studying how it evolves. In a paper published today in Cell Chemical Biology , scientists from the Francis Crick Institute and Imperial College London studied malaria parasites resistant to a promising new class of candidate antimalarial drugs.

Environment - Life Sciences - 09.05.2019
Birds outside their comfort zone are more vulnerable to deforestation
Birds outside their comfort zone are more vulnerable to deforestation
Members of the same bird species can have dramatically different responses to deforestation depending on where they live, finds a new study. Predicting a species' sensitivity to environmental changes, such as deforestation or climate change, is crucial for designing conservation strategies. These predictions are often based on a species' physical traits, and assume that all members of a species will respond the same.

Life Sciences - Innovation / Technology - 09.05.2019
Global Alliance of Biofoundries is major step forward in synthetic biology
Global Alliance of Biofoundries is major step forward in synthetic biology
A new network of the world's leading Biofoundries has been launched to drive forward synthetic biology research and industry. The Global Alliance of Biofoundries (GBA) brings together 16 institutions from countries including the UK, US, Japan, Singapore, China, Australia, Denmark and Canada. The London DNA Foundry , based at Imperial College London, is one of the leading founders of the new Global Alliance.

Agronomy / Food Science - 08.05.2019
Obesity rising faster in rural areas than cities
Obesity rising faster in rural areas than cities
Obesity is increasing more rapidly in the world's rural areas than in cities, according to a new study of global trends in body-mass index (BMI). The research analysed the height and weight data of more than 112 million adults across urban and rural areas of 200 countries and territories between 1985 and 2017.

Life Sciences - Health - 08.05.2019
Stress in early life could make people more likely to develop depression
New research by the University of Bristol has found that early life adversity could make an individual more at risk of developing negative thinking, which could lead to major depressive disorder (MDD). The findings provide biological and psychological evidence to support work first proposed in the 1960s.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.05.2019
New film of immune system killing bacteria could point to new therapies
New film of immune system killing bacteria could point to new therapies
New film showing how our immune system attacks bacteria may guide the development of new therapies that harness the immune system against infections. To kill bacteria in the blood, our immune system opens deadly ‘bullet holes' in their membranes, causing them to burst and die. The holes are created by structures called membrane attack complexes (MACs).

Politics - 07.05.2019
Scale of Russian interference in European democracy revealed
Evidence of the Kremlin-backed Internet Research Agency's long-term interest in European politics and elections has been revealed in two new studies from Cardiff University's Crime and Security Research Institute. Taken together the findings provide a strong indication of the kinds of disinformation campaigns that could be directed towards the 2019 European Parliamentary elections on 23 May.

Environment - 06.05.2019
Rethinking digital service design could reduce their environmental impact
Rethinking digital service design could reduce their environmental impact
Digital technology companies could reduce the carbon footprint of services like You Tube by changing how they are designed, experts say. Human-Computer Interaction researchers from the University of Bristol looked at how much electric energy was used to provide YouTube videos to people globally in 2016, to enable them to estimate the service's carbon footprint in that year.

Social Sciences - 03.05.2019
Personal stories of mental illness can help others on the road to recovery
Inspirational stories of how people have overcome their struggles with mental illness can help others on the road to recovery, a study by researchers at The University of Nottingham has found. However, first-hand accounts that include specific details of harmful behaviour may have a negative impact on some groups, including those battling an eating disorder.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 03.05.2019
Have scientists observed a black hole swallowing a neutron star?
Have scientists observed a black hole swallowing a neutron star?
Within weeks of switching their machines back on to scour the sky for more sources of gravitational waves, scientists are poring over data in an attempt to further understand an unprecedented cosmic event. Astronomers working at the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and the European-based Virgo detector have reported the possible detection of gravitational waves emanating from the collision of a neutron star and a black hole.

Life Sciences - Health - 03.05.2019
Genetic conditions lead to range of overlapping needs in children
Deletions and duplications of DNA are responsible for wide-ranging developmental difficulties in children, finds a new study by Cardiff University.

Physics - 02.05.2019
Machine Learning paves the way for next-level quantum sensing
Machine Learning paves the way for next-level quantum sensing
University of Bristol researchers have reached new heights of sophistication in detecting magnetic fields with extreme sensitivity at room temperature by combining machine learning with a quantum sensor. The findings, published in Physical Review X, could lead to a new generation of MRI scanners which use magnetic fields and radio waves to produce detailed images of the inside of the body, as well as further potential uses within biology and material science.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 02.05.2019
UofG astrophysicists investigate two new neutron star collisions
Astrophysicists at the University of Glasgow are celebrating the detection of gravitational wave signals likely to be caused by the crashing of two neutron stars and what could be the first evidence of the collision of a neutron star and a black hole. The University of Glasgow researchers are key partners in the international scientific collaboration which made the new detections - the National Science Foundation's Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO), based in the United States, and Virgo, based in Italy.