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Medicine/Pharmacology - Administration/Government
24.03.2017
New era in precision medicine for pancreatic cancer
The development of new treatments for pancreatic cancer is set to be transformed by a network of clinical trials, aiming to find the right trial for the right patient, after a £10 million investment from Cancer Research UK. The investment will support the PRECISION Panc project which aims to develop personalised treatments for pancreatic cancer patients, improving the options and outcomes for a disease where survival rates have remained stubbornly low.
Religions - Social Sciences
24.03.2017
Study into who is least afraid of death
A new study examines all robust, available data on how fearful we are of what happens once we shuffle off this mortal coil.  They find that atheists are among those least afraid of dying...and, perhaps not surprisingly, the very religious.  Religion has long been thought to be a solution to the problem of death.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Agronomy/Food Science
23.03.2017
Use food subsidies as carrot to encourage healthier eating habits for obese
Use food subsidies as carrot to encourage healthier eating habits for obese
Subsidising healthy foods by up to 10 per cent would do more to shift the eating habits of overweight and obese people than a tax on unhealthy products, and could be cost effective in the long-run, according to the findings of a new study published by economists at the University. Based on the current numbers of obese people in the UK, the authors estimate that a 10 per cent healthy food subsidy over the course of a lifetime and across the population could save as much as £7.2 billion in the long-run.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
23.03.2017
New stem cell method produces millions of human brain and muscle cells in days
Scientists at the University of Cambridge and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute have created a new technique that simplifies the production of human brain and muscle cells - allowing millions of functional cells to be generated in just a few days. The results published today in Stem Cell Reports open the door to producing a diversity of new cell types that could not be made before in order to study disease.
Law/Forensics
23.03.2017
Family court transparency
New research from Cardiff University's School of Law and Politics suggests that guidance given to judges to routinely publish their judgments is not being consistently followed, leaving the public with a patchy understanding of the family justice system in England and Wales. Issued in 2014, the guidance was intended to address perceptions, especially in the media, of ‘secrecy' and ‘justice behind closed doors' when important decisions are made about children in family courts.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
23.03.2017
Is there a link between telomere length and cancer?
Is there a link between telomere length and cancer?
Telomeres are regions of repetitive DNA at the end of human chromosomes, which protect the end of the chromosome from damage. Whilst shorter telomeres are hypothesized biological markers of older age and have been linked to many diseases, including cancer and cardiovascular diseases, whether these associations are causal is unknown.
Earth Sciences - Life Sciences
22.03.2017
New study shakes the roots of the dinosaur family tree
New study shakes the roots of the dinosaur family tree
More than a century of theory about the evolutionary history of dinosaurs has been turned on its head following the publication of new research from scientists at the University of Cambridge and Natural History Museum in London. Their work suggests that the family groupings need to be rearranged, re-defined and re-named and also that dinosaurs may have originated in the northern hemisphere rather than the southern, as current thinking goes.
Mathematics
22.03.2017
Maths formula offers key to sperm fertility
The rhythm with which individual sperm move could explain why some successfully fertilise the female egg and others fail, a new Oxford University collaboration has found. From studying the rhythmic movements, researchers at the Universities of York, Birmingham, Oxford and Kyoto University, Japan, have developed a mathematical formula which makes it easier to understand and predict how sperm make the journey to fertilise an egg.
Astronomy
22.03.2017
Fledgling stars try to prevent their neighbours from birthing planets
Fledgling stars try to prevent their neighbours from birthing planets
Stars don't have to be massive to evaporate material from around nearby stars and affect their ability to form planets, a new study suggests. Newly formed stars are surrounded by a disc of dense gas and dust. This is called the protoplanetary disc, as material sticks together within it to form planets.
Life Sciences - Earth Sciences
22.03.2017
Ground-breaking fossilised tissue reveals the gradual evolution of crouched legs in birds
Ground-breaking fossilised tissue reveals the gradual evolution of crouched legs in birds
Living birds have a more crouched leg posture compared to their dinosaurian ancestors, which generally are thought to have moved with straighter limbs - similar to the postures of humans. A joint study by researchers from the UK and China, including the University of Bristol, sheds light on how birds shifted toward this more crouched posture.
Astronomy - Physics/Materials Science
22.03.2017
Universe's ultraviolet background could provide clues about missing galaxies
Universe’s ultraviolet background could provide clues about missing galaxies
Universe's ultraviolet background could provide clues about missing galaxies (22 March 2017) Astronomers have developed a way to detect the ultraviolet (UV) background of the Universe, which could help explain why there are so few small galaxies in the cosmos. UV radiation is invisible but shows up as visible red light when it interacts with gas.
Life Sciences - Architecture
21.03.2017
Satnavs 'switch off' parts of the brain
Satnavs ’switch off’ parts of the brain
Using a satnav to get to your destination 'switches off' parts of the brain that would otherwise be used to simulate different routes, reveals new UCL research. The study, published and funded by Wellcome, involved 24 volunteers navigating a simulation of Soho in central London while undergoing brain scans.
Medicine/Pharmacology
21.03.2017
Sussex Drug Discovery Centre & ReViral reach clinical trial with ‘game changer' lung virus treatment
Sussex Drug Discovery Centre & ReViral reach clinical trial with ‘game changer’ lung virus treatment
Sussex Drug Discovery Centre & ReViral reach clinical trial with ‘game changer' lung virus treatment A collaboration between scientists at one of the UK's leading university drug discovery centres and the UK-based biotech company ReViral has led to the development of a drug aimed at treating people suffering from respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) – a common and potentially life-threatening lung condition affecting babies, the immune-compromised and the elderly.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
21.03.2017
Research highlights potential way to combat toxoplasmosis parasite
It lives inside one third of the UK population and is a common infection in cats, however until now scientists knew little about how the toxoplasmosis parasite communicated with its host.‌ New research, by the University of Glasgow's Wellcome Centre for Molecular Parasitology in collaboration with The University of Vermont, has revealed how the parasite uses a key protein to form a communication network and ultimately continue the infection process.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Environment/Sustainable Development
21.03.2017
Ghosts of past diseases shape species evolution
Ghosts of past diseases shape species evolution
A team of researchers from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) and the Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology (EAWAG) has revealed that diseases can not only affect fish evolution, but also the aquatic environments in which fish live. Parasites and diseases are major elements of the environment that affect animal populations.
Computer Science/Telecom
21.03.2017
Scientists look to AI for help in peer review
Scientists look to AI for help in peer review
Peer review is a cornerstone of the scientific publishing process but could artificial intelligence help with the process' Computer scientists from the University of Bristol have reviewed how state-of-the-art tools from machine learning and artificial intelligence are already helping to automate parts of the academic peer-review process.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
21.03.2017
Infections during pregnancy may interfere with key genes associated with autism and prenatal brain development
Infections during pregnancy may interfere with key genes associated with autism and prenatal brain development
If a mother picks up an infection during pregnancy, her immune system will kick into action to clear the infection - but this self-defence mechanism may also have a small influence how her child's brain develops in the womb, in ways that are similar to how the brain develops in autism spectrum disorders.
Physics/Materials Science
21.03.2017
New particles discovered in CERN experiment with Warwick physicist
A new group of particles which have long been hiding in plain sight have finally been discovered thanks to the incredibly sensitive LHCb experiment at CERN - involving a physicist from the University of Warwick. Professor Tim Gershon from the Department of Physics is the UK spokesperson for the LHCb, otherwise known as the Large Hadron Collider beauty experiment.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
20.03.2017
New technology enables detailed analysis of target proteins
New technology enables detailed analysis of target proteins
A team of researchers from Queen Mary University of University (QMUL), Francis Crick Institute , Goethe University Frankfurt and University of Tübingen in Germany have developed a novel technology to understand how an important protein connects to other cellular proteins.  Ubiquitin is a small protein that controls and modulates the function of other cellular proteins by connecting to them.
Physics/Materials Science - Environment/Sustainable Development
20.03.2017
‘Fingerprint' technique spots frog populations at risk from pollution
‘Fingerprint’ technique spots frog populations at risk from pollution
Researchers at Lancaster University have found a way to detect subtle early warning signs that reveal a frog population is at risk from pollution. Worldwide, amphibian populations are declining due to habitat loss, disease and pollution which is cited as a major threat to their survival. Scientists publishing in Scientific Reports , have found evidence of stress in tadpoles taken from ponds most impacted by pollution caused by nutrients and pesticides.
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