Psychology - Dec 12
New research from King's College London identifies a possible mechanism that shows how bullying may influence the structure of the adolescent brain, suggesting the effects of constantly being bullied are more than just psychological. The study, published in Molecular Psychiatry , shows that there may be physical structural differences in the brains of adolescents who are regularly victimized, and this could increase the chance that they suffer from mental illness.
Environment - Dec 11
Environment

Victims of hurricane strikes in the US are becoming more vulnerable to future disasters by re-building their homes bigger than before, research has suggested.

Health - Dec 11
Health

The well-known drug tamoxifen could exploit a weakness in the physical 'scaffolds' around tumours, according to research led by Imperial.

Health - Dec 11
Health

A new study from the University of Bristol supports body mass index (BMI) as a useful tool for assessing obesity and health.

Health - Dec 11

New research has revealed how a paternal grandfather's access to abundant food as a young boy causes their grandsons to have a higher risk of dying.


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Psychology - 11:03
How bullying affects the brain
New research from King's College London identifies a possible mechanism that shows how bullying may influence the structure of the adolescent brain, suggesting the effects of constantly being bullied are more than just psychological. The study, published in Molecular Psychiatry , shows that there may be physical structural differences in the brains of adolescents who are regularly victimized, and this could increase the chance that they suffer from mental illness.

Environment - 11.12.2018
House size increases after hurricane strikes
House size increases after hurricane strikes
Victims of hurricane strikes in the US are becoming more vulnerable to future disasters by re-building their homes bigger than before, research has suggested. In a new study Cardiff University scientists have shown that in specific locations, houses hit by hurricanes are being replaced by new houses that in some areas are more than 50 per cent bigger.

Health - 11.12.2018
BMI is a good measure of health after all
BMI is a good measure of health after all
A new study from the University of Bristol supports body mass index (BMI) as a useful tool for assessing obesity and health. A simple measure based on weight and height, BMI is widely used to assess if a person is of a healthy weight. But its reliability as a health measure is often criticised, as it does not distinguish fat from muscle and does not tell us where body fat is stored.

Health - Pharmacology - 11.12.2018
Breast cancer drug could create chink in the armour of pancreatic cancer
Breast cancer drug could create chink in the armour of pancreatic cancer
The well-known drug tamoxifen could exploit a weakness in the physical 'scaffolds' around tumours, according to research led by Imperial. The report's authors, led by Imperial College London, say that following further research, the drug might in future be repurposed to help treat pancreatic cancer as well.

Health - Business / Economics - 11.12.2018
Grandfather’s high access to food increases grandson’s mortality risk
New research has revealed how a paternal grandfather's access to abundant food as a young boy causes their grandsons to have a higher risk of dying. The findings, published today , show that good access to food at the pre-pubescent age of nine to 12 means their grandsons - but not their granddaughters - die on average earlier, especially from cancer.

Health - Pharmacology - 11.12.2018
Childhood leukaemia distinct from adult disease
Scientists have identified and modelled a distinct biology for paediatric acute myeloid leukaemia, one of the major causes of death in children.‌ ‌‌ The breakthrough research, from the University of Glasgow's Institute of Cancer Sciences and published , significantly advances understanding of the disease and provides potential for developing specific treatment strategies for this childhood cancer, which is currently treated with therapies extrapolated from adult practice.

Health - 11.12.2018
UofG projects win funding to bring origami diagnostics to low-income countries
University of Glasgow engineers have secured funding to develop new medical diagnostic technologies to help treat infectious diseases in Africa and Vietnam. The Royal Academy of Engineering will provide 53,000in support as part of their Frontiers of Engineering for Development programme, which aims to initiate collaborations between early career researchers around the world to tackle challenges faced by low and middle income countries.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.12.2018
New genetic study could lead to better treatment of severe asthma
The largest-ever genetic study of people with moderate-to-severe asthma has revealed new insights into the underlying causes of the disease which could help improve its diagnosis and treatment. Between 10-15% of individuals with asthma have the severe type of the condition which does not respond to conventional treatment.

Health - 10.12.2018
People with diabetes are more at risk of heart failure
Researchers have found that incidence of heart failure was around two-fold higher in people with diabetes. The study, led by the University of Glasgow on behalf of the Scottish Diabetes Research Network and published today in Circulation , found that patients with Type 1 diabetes were also more likely to die as a result of heart failure, in comparison with patients with type 2 diabetes and those without diabetes.

Physics - Materials Science - 10.12.2018
Answering the mystery of what atoms do when liquids and gases meet
Answering the mystery of what atoms do when liquids and gases meet
How atoms arrange themselves at the smallest scale was thought to follow a 'drum-skin' rule, but mathematicians have now found a simpler solution. Atomic arrangements in different materials can provide a lot of information about the properties of materials, and what the potential is for altering what they can be used for.

Palaeontology - 10.12.2018
Birds and dinosaurs evolved to dazzle with colourful displays
Birds and dinosaurs evolved to dazzle with colourful displays
Iridescence is responsible for some of the most striking visual displays in the animal kingdom. Now, thanks to a new study of feathers from almost 100 modern bird species, scientists have gained new insights into how this colour diversity evolved. Iridescence refers to the phenomena where colour changes when an object is viewed from different angles.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.12.2018
Dialysis patients at risk of progressive brain injury
Kidney dialysis can cause short-term ‘cerebral stunning' and may be associated with progressive brain injury in those who receive the treatment for many years. For many patients with kidney failure awaiting a kidney transplant or those not suitable for a transplant, dialysis is a life-saving treatment.

Health - Pharmacology - 07.12.2018
Increasing statins dose and patient adherence could save more lives
Increasing statins dose and patient adherence could save more lives
Improving adherence to cholesterol-lowering treatments reduces cardiovascular risk for at risk patients. Thousands of heart attacks and deaths from cardiovascular disease could be prevented by patients taking higher doses of statins and taking the drugs as advised by doctors.

Health - Astronomy / Space Science - 07.12.2018
Starburst galaxies and blast injuries: News from the College
Here's a batch of fresh news and announcements from across Imperial. From new insights into star formation, to an annual blast injury conference, here is some quick-read news from across the College. Extreme starburst galaxies Current theories predict a maximum amount of stars that a galaxy can produce each year.

Astronomy / Space Science - 07.12.2018
Largest ever black hole merger detected
Largest ever black hole merger detected
Gravitational waves have been detected after the largest collision of black holes ever observed. The collision took place roughly five billion years ago and produced gravitational waves that were observed on Earth by extremely sensitive detectors on 29 July 2017. The gravitational waves - tiny ripples in space-time that are produced by violent cosmic events - showed that the black holes weighed more than 50 and 34 times the mass of our Sun and collided to produce a single object over 80 times the mass of our star.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.12.2018
Bacterial 'sleeper cells' evade antibiotics and weaken defence against infection
Bacterial ’sleeper cells’ evade antibiotics and weaken defence against infection
New research, from scientists at Imperial College London, unravels how so-called bacterial persister cells manipulate our immune cells. The work potentially opens new avenues to finding ways of clearing these bacterial cells from the body, and stopping recurrence of the bacterial infection. The latest findings may help explain why some people suffer from repeated bouts of an illness, despite taking antibiotics.

Health - 06.12.2018
Survey reveals bovine TB in a fifth of roadkill badgers in Cheshire
The first study to test for bovine tuberculosis in badgers on the edge of the cattle TB epidemic in England, has shown that one in five badgers tested positive for the disease. The pilot survey was carried out on road-killed badgers collected in Cheshire in 2014 through a local stakeholder TB Group that included farmers, wildlife groups and vets.

Environment - Life Sciences - 06.12.2018
Under the Trafalgar Square Christmas tree
Under the Trafalgar Square Christmas tree
Tonight the crowds will gather in Trafalgar Square to see the lights on the world's most famous Christmas tree switched on. But it's the bits we can't see that make the Norway Spruce ( Picea abies ) so magnificent. CT scanning - X-Ray Computed Tomography (X-Ray CT) - is an imaging technique originally developed by Sir Godfrey Hounsfield for medical application.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.12.2018
New genetic insight could help treat rare debilitating heart and lung condition
New genetic insight could help treat rare debilitating heart and lung condition
The largest study of genetic variation in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension has associated two important genes with the disease. In collaboration with institutes from Europe and Northern America, researchers from Imperial College London have conducted the largest genetic analysis to date of 2,000 patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and identified associations with two genes.

Astronomy / Space Science - 05.12.2018
Bringing balance to the Universe
A new toy model proposes a way to unify dark energy and dark matter in our Universe. Normal matter is the basic building block of humans, plants, and the solar system, but yet only comprises 5% of all the matter in the Universe. The other 95% is typically invisible, other than when its presence is inferred via gravitational effects.
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