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Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
24.02.2017
Study offers hope of new treatment for rheumatoid arthritis
Patients who do not respond to current rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treatments may benefit from a new form of treatment that has been shown in a study to be effective against symptoms of the disease. The RA-BEAM study is the first to demonstrate that the drug baricitinib is more effective in improving the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis than the current standard treatment of injectable biologic anti-TNF medications.
Media - Environment/Sustainable Development
24.02.2017
’Computer bots are like humans, having fights lasting years’
Researchers say 'benevolent bots', otherwise known as software robots, that are designed to make articles on Wikipedia better often end up having online fights lasting years over changes in content. Editing bots on Wikipedia undo vandalism, enforce bans, check spelling, create links and import content automatically, whereas other bots (which are non-editing) can mine data, identify data or identify copyright infringements.
Agronomy/Food Science - Medicine/Pharmacology
23.02.2017
Long-term stress linked to higher levels of obesity
Long-term stress linked to higher levels of obesity
People who suffer long-term stress may also be more prone to obesity, according to research by scientists at UCL which involved examining hair samples for levels of cortisol, a hormone which regulates the body's response to stress. The paper, published in the journal Obesity , showed that exposure to higher levels of cortisol over several months is associated with people being more heavily, and more persistently, overweight.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
23.02.2017
Faster biological ageing could increase risk for depression in childhood
Genetic factors which predispose people to accelerated ‘biological ageing' also increase their risk of developing depression in childhood, according to a new study from King's College London. The findings, published today in the Journal of Affective Disorders , suggest that the causes of childhood-onset depression may be different from those of adult-onset depression, and could lead to new treatments targeting the mechanisms which govern biological ageing.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
23.02.2017
Artificial intelligence could increase speed and reliability of brain research
Artificial intelligence could increase speed and reliability of brain research
Neuroscientists at Imperial have highlighted the benefits of using machine learning techniques in real-time brain imaging studies. The researchers say the technique, which uses artificial intelligence (AI) to automatically design the best possible experiment, could improve the results from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies, a neuroimaging technique that creates images of activity levels in different brain regions.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
23.02.2017
Research suggests a new model of chronic disease
Genes play a key role in determining whether someone experiences multiple chronic diseases, according to new research by King's. Chronic pain, depression and heart disease are three of the commonest causes of disability, and are becoming more prevalent. People are also increasingly likely to suffer from more than one chronic disease, resulting in greater disability.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
23.02.2017
New study identifies possible early warning signs of Huntington's disease
New study identifies possible early warning signs of Huntington’s disease
Early warning signs of Huntington's disease have been uncovered in a sheep carrying the human disease-causing genetic variant, providing new insights into this devastating illness, a new study in Scientific Reports has found. Despite its devastating impacts on patients and their families, there are currently limited treatments options, and no cure for Huntington's disease Jenny Morton Researchers from the University of Cambridge and University of Surrey have identified early biomarkers of disease during examinations of Huntington's disease sheep still at a pre-symptomatic stage of the disease.
Astronomy - Earth Sciences
23.02.2017
Space dust deploy bubble parachutes on their fiery descent, scientists discover
Space dust deploy bubble parachutes on their fiery descent, scientists discover
Bubbles acting like parachutes are deployed by some cosmic dust particles on their entry into Earth's atmosphere, preventing them from burning up. Think of microscopic rice bubbles made of molten rock and you get the picture about what this cosmic dust looks like. – Dr Matt Genge Department of Earth Science and Engineering This is the conclusion of a new study carried out by a researcher from Imperial College London.
Business/Economics - Careers/Employment
23.02.2017
Female bosses favour gay and lesbian job-seekers, research finds
Female bosses favour gay and lesbian job-seekers, research finds Women are more likely to hire gay and lesbian job applicants over equally-qualified straight candidates, according to a study led by the University of Sussex. But the opposite is true if the recruiter is a man – all else being equal, male bosses judge heterosexual applicants as more hireable.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
23.02.2017
Europeans brought new strains of ulcer-causing bacterium to pre-Columbian Americas
Europeans brought new strains of ulcer-causing bacterium to pre-Columbian Americas
A genomic study of a harmful stomach bacterium finds that foreign strains intermingled with and replaced local strains after the arrival of Europeans and African slaves across the Americas. The study by an international team of researchers, including Daniel Falush from the University's Milner Centre for Evolution is published February 23, 2017 in PLOS Genetics .
Life Sciences
23.02.2017
Ball-rolling bees reveal complex learning
Ball-rolling bees reveal complex learning
Bumblebees can be trained to score goals using a mini-ball, revealing unprecedented learning abilities, according to scientists at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL). Thursday 23 February 2017 Their study suggests that species whose lifestyle demands advanced learning abilities could learn entirely new behaviours if there is ecological pressure.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Administration/Government
22.02.2017
Bowel scope cuts cancer risk for at least 17 years
Bowel scope cuts cancer risk for at least 17 years
A one-off screening test reduces the risk of developing bowel cancer by more than one third and could save thousands of lives, a study has found. Researchers based at Imperial College London found that the test - which examines the lower part of the large bowel - prevented more than half of potential bowel cancers from developing in that area and two thirds of deaths were avoided.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Psychology
22.02.2017
Cat ownership not linked to mental health problems
Cat ownership not linked to mental health problems
New UCL research has found no link between cat ownership and psychotic symptoms, casting doubt on previous suggestions that people who grew up with cats are at higher risk of mental illness. Recent research has suggested that cat ownership might contribute to some mental disorders, because cats are the primary host of the common parasite Toxoplasma Gondii (T.
Life Sciences - Environment/Sustainable Development
22.02.2017
Blood ties fuel cooperation among species, not survival instinct
Over 4,000 different bird species, including White Fronted Bee Eaters, were observed in the study, which found that survival instinct did not influence species cooperative breeding decisions. Instead, it shows communal living and helping behaviour to be a natural result of monogamous relationships reinforcing stronger genetic bonds in family groups.
Life Sciences
22.02.2017
New study gives weight to Darwin's theory of 'living fossils'
New study gives weight to Darwin’s theory of ’living fossils’
A team of researchers from the University of Bristol studying the ‘living fossil' Sphenodon - or tuatara - have identified a new way to measure the evolutionary rate of these enigmatic creatures, giving credence to Darwin's theory of ‘living fossils'. The tuatara is a relatively large lizard-like animal that once lived on the main islands of New Zealand but has been pushed to smaller, offshore islands by human activity.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Business/Economics
21.02.2017
Average life expectancy set to increase by 2030
Average life expectancy set to increase by 2030
Average life expectancy is set to increase in many countries by 2030 - and will exceed 90 years in South Korea, according to new research. The study, led by scientists from Imperial College London in collaboration with the World Health Organization, analysed long-term data on mortality and longevity trends to predict how life expectancy will change in 35 industrialised countries by 2030.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
21.02.2017
'Junk DNA' could play an important role in diabetes
’Junk DNA’ could play an important role in diabetes
Researchers at Imperial College London have found that so-called 'junk DNA' could play a role in diabetes. The human genome is enormous, containing billions of ‘letters' of genetic code. But among the thousands of genes which code for vital proteins, hidden in plain sight are much vaster chunks of non-coding junk DNA, previously thought to have no function.
Mathematics
21.02.2017
Maths and maps make you nervous’ It could be in your genes
Our genes play a significant role in how anxious we feel when faced with spatial and mathematical tasks, such as reading a map or solving a geometry problem, according to a new study by researchers from King's College London. Spatial skills are important in everyday life, from navigation to assembling flat-pack furniture, and have also been linked to success in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) professions.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
20.02.2017
MS treatment that 'resets' immune system may halt disease for at least 5 years
MS treatment that ’resets’ immune system may halt disease for at least 5 years
A type of treatment for multiple sclerosis that 'resets' the immune system may stop progression of the disease in nearly half of patients. In a new study, led by Imperial College London , the treatment prevented symptoms of severe disease from worsening for five years, in 46 per cent of patients.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
20.02.2017
Modern housing may cut malaria risk in sub-Saharan Africa
Modern housing has been shown to be associated with a reduced risk of malarial infection in children in sub-Saharan Africa, compared to more traditional thatched houses.
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