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Medicine/Pharmacology - Computer Science/Telecom
24.04.2017
Artificial intelligence can accurately predict future heart disease and strokes, study finds
Computers that can teach themselves from routine clinical data are potentially better at predicting cardiovascular risk than current standard medical risk models, according to new research at the University of Nottingham.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
24.04.2017
New test can identify dangerous bacteria resistant to last-resort antibiotic
New test can identify dangerous bacteria resistant to last-resort antibiotic
Research suggests it is possible to quickly and accurately diagnose some the most dangerous and drug-resistant types of bacterial infections. The study also says the test could be performed using equipment already owned by most hospitals. Bacteria have been gradually evolving to become resistant to the antibiotics used to treat them.
Astronomy
21.04.2017
Simulated galaxies provide fresh evidence of dark matter
Simulated galaxies provide fresh evidence of dark matter
A simulated galaxy is pictured, showing the main ingredients that make up a galaxy: the stars (blue), the gas from which the stars are born (red), and the dark matter halo that surrounds the galaxy (light grey) Further evidence of the existence of dark matter – the mysterious substance that is believed to hold the Universe together – has been produced by Cosmologists at Durham University.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Administration/Government
21.04.2017
Overhunting results in wide-spread declines in tropical mammal & bird populations
Overhunting results in wide-spread declines in tropical mammal & bird populations
Overhunting results in wide-spread declines in tropical mammal & bird populations Tropical mammal and bird populations dramatically decline in overhunted areas – new research reveals. The major study published in the renowned journal Science, reveals hunting accounts for a 83 percent decline in mammal populations and a 58 percent decline in bird populations in the tropical regions of Central and South America, Africa and Asia.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Psychology
20.04.2017
Phobia of dentists leads to more decay and tooth loss, new study finds
People who have a severe fear of the dentist are more likely to have tooth decay or missing teeth, according to a new study from King's College London. The study, published today in the British Dental Journal , compared the oral health of people with and without dental phobia. The results showed that people with dental phobia are more likely to have one or more decayed teeth, as well as missing teeth.
Physics/Materials Science
20.04.2017
Widely used engineering technique has unintended consequences new research reveals
Felix Hofmann and Edmund Tarleton, both authors of the paper, at the Focused Ion Beam (FIB) instrument at the Department of Materials, University of Oxford, UK. A technique that revolutionised scientists' ability to manipulate and study materials at the nano-scale may have dramatic unintended consequences, new Oxford University research reveals.  Focused Ion Beam Milling (FIB) uses a tiny beam of highly energetic particles to cut and analyse materials smaller than one thousandth of a stand of human hair.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Environment/Sustainable Development
20.04.2017
Deadly amphibian plague can infect young zebrafish, scientists discover
Deadly amphibian plague can infect young zebrafish, scientists discover
The deadly chytrid fungus has for the first time been found to infect and kill species other than amphibians, giving clues on how it causes disease. The fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis ( Bd ), is a type of chytrid that has severely affected over 700 amphibian species worldwide, and has made more species extinct than any other infectious disease known to science – at least 200 so far.
Physics/Materials Science
20.04.2017
Widely used engineering technique has unintended consequences
Felix Hofmann and Edmund Tarleton, both authors of the paper, at the Focused Ion Beam (FIB) instrument at the Department of Materials, University of Oxford, UK. A technique that revolutionised scientists' ability to manipulate and study materials at the nano-scale may have dramatic unintended consequences, new Oxford University research reveals.  Focused Ion Beam Milling (FIB) uses a tiny beam of highly energetic particles to cut and analyse materials smaller than one thousandth of a stand of human hair.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
20.04.2017
Two repurposed drugs that arrest neurodegeneration in mice
Two repurposed drugs that arrest neurodegeneration in mice
A team of scientists who a few years ago identified a major pathway that leads to brain cell death in mice, have now found two drugs that block the pathway and prevent neurodegeneration. The drugs caused minimal side effects in the mice and one is already licensed for use in humans, so is ready for clinical trials.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
19.04.2017
Amino acids in diet could be key to starving cancer
Amino acids in diet could be key to starving cancer
Cutting out certain amino acids – the building blocks of proteins – from the diet of mice slows tumour growth and prolongs survival, according to new research* published in Nature. Researchers at the Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute and the University of Glasgow found that removing two non-essential amino acids – serine and glycine – from the diet of mice slowed the development of lymphoma and intestinal cancer.
Life Sciences - Psychology
19.04.2017
First evidence for higher state of consciousness found
First evidence for higher state of consciousness found
Researchers have uncovered the first scientific evidence of a 'higher' state of consciousness. In the study, neuroscientists observed a sustained increase in the diversity of brain signals of people under the influence of psychedelic drugs, compared with when they were in a normal ‘awake and aware' state.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
19.04.2017
Algorithm matches genetic variation to disease symptoms and could improve diagnosis of rare diseases
Algorithm matches genetic variation to disease symptoms and could improve diagnosis of rare diseases
A faster and more accurate method of identifying which of an individual's genes are associated with particular symptoms has been developed by a team of researchers from the UK and Saudi Arabia. This new approach could enable scientists to take advantage of recent developments in genome sequencing to improve diagnosis and potential treatment options.
Life Sciences - Psychology
19.04.2017
First evidence for higher state of consciousness found
First evidence for higher state of consciousness found
First evidence for higher state of consciousness found Scientific evidence of a ‘higher' state of consciousness has been found in a study led by the University of Sussex. Neuroscientists observed a sustained increase in neural signal diversity – a measure of the complexity of brain activity - of people under the influence of psychedelic drugs, compared with when they were in a normal waking state.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
19.04.2017
Which facial features are most controlled by genetics
Research published this week in Scientific Reports uses computer image and statistical shape analysis to shed light on which parts of the face are most likely to be inherited. The study, by researchers at King's College London, examined 3D face models of nearly 1,000 UK female twins, and found that the shapes of the end of the nose, the area above and below the lips, cheekbones and the inner corner of the eye were highly influenced by genetics.
Medicine/Pharmacology - History/Archeology
18.04.2017
Highs and lows of an Englishman’s average height over 2000 years
Researchers have used data on skeletal remains to calculate how the average height of Englishmen rose or fell over 2,000 years of history. They reasoned that height, which is linked with childhood nutrition, is a good alternative measure of wellbeing and can be estimated accurately from the length of a full grown man's femur.
Earth Sciences
17.04.2017
Banned industrial solvent sheds new light on methane mystery
Banned industrial solvent sheds new light on methane mystery
Since 2007, scientists have been searching to find the cause of a sudden and unexpected global rise in atmospheric methane, a potent greenhouse gas, following almost a decade in which concentrations had stayed relatively constant. Recent studies have explored a range of possible causes. Suggestions have included a rise in oil and natural gas extraction, increased emissions from tropical wetlands or increases in emissions from growing East Asian economies.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Chemistry
13.04.2017
New insights into the molecular processes of immune regulation
New insights into the molecular processes of immune regulation
Researchers from the Department of Pharmacy & Pharmacology have made an important discovery that might lead to novel therapies to combat chronic inflammation. The work, jointly funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) and Wellcome Trust, is published in the Journal of Immunology and focuses on so-called danger signals such as reactive oxygen species that are released by damaged or dying cells during wounding or infection, and their impact on the subsequent immune response.
Computer Science/Telecom - Life Sciences
13.04.2017
Biased bots: Human prejudices sneak into AI systems
Biased bots: Human prejudices sneak into AI systems
Many experts think of artificial intelligence systems as coldly logical and objectively rational. But in a new study researchers have demonstrated how machines can be reflections of us and acquire human-like biases. Common machine learning programs, when trained with ordinary human language available online, can acquire cultural biases embedded in the patterns of wording, the researchers found.
Medicine/Pharmacology
13.04.2017
Proof that magnesium could prevent fractures
Proof that magnesium could prevent fractures
Magnesium could hold the key to preventing one of the most preventable causes of disability in middle-aged to elderly people, according to new research led by academics at the Universities of Bristol and Eastern Finland. Bone fractures are one of the leading causes of disability and ill health especially among the ageing population and this increases the burden on the health care system.
Life Sciences
12.04.2017
Homing pigeons share our ability to build knowledge across generations
Homing pigeons may share the human capacity to build on the knowledge of others, improving their navigational efficiency over time, a new Oxford University study has found. The ability to gather, pass on and improve on knowledge over generations is known as cumulative culture. Until now humans and, arguably some other primates, were the only species thought to be capable of it.
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