Life Sciences - May 24
Life Sciences
Scientists from the University of Bristol and the Natural History Museum in London have reconstructed the evolutionary history of the chelicerates, the mega-diverse group of 110,000 arthropods that includes spiders, scorpions, mites and ticks. They found, for the first time, genomic evidence that mites and ticks do not constitute two distantly related lineages, rather they are part of the same evolutionary line.
Health - May 23

Researchers at Cardiff and Swansea Universities are running a new trial to investigate whether a medicine currently used for the skin condition psoriasis could also be used to help people with type 1 diabetes produce some of their own insulin.

Health - May 22
Health

Although it has been known for a long time, that education, and socioeconomic position affect health, particularly in later life, there was limited knowledge as to why.

Materials Science - May 23
Materials Science

Researchers have developed washable, wearable 'batteries' based on cheap, safe and environmentally friendly inks and woven directly into fabrics.

Health - May 22

Scientists have helped unravel the link between higher levels of education and reduced risk of heart attack and stroke. Previous research showed every 3.6 years spent in education can reduce a person's lifetime risk of heart disease by a third.


Category


Years
2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009


Results 1 - 20 of 427.
1 2 3 4 5 ... 22 Next »


Life Sciences - Health - 24.05.2019
Shows that mites and ticks are close relatives
Shows that mites and ticks are close relatives
Scientists from the University of Bristol and the Natural History Museum in London have reconstructed the evolutionary history of the chelicerates, the mega-diverse group of 110,000 arthropods that includes spiders, scorpions, mites and ticks. They found, for the first time, genomic evidence that mites and ticks do not constitute two distantly related lineages, rather they are part of the same evolutionary line.

Health - Pharmacology - 23.05.2019
Trial of potential new treatment for type 1 diabetes
Researchers at Cardiff and Swansea Universities are running a new trial to investigate whether a medicine currently used for the skin condition psoriasis could also be used to help people with type 1 diabetes produce some of their own insulin. Over 300,000 people in the UK have Type 1 diabetes and the drug used to treat them - insulin - has not changed in 98 years.

Materials Science - Electroengineering - 23.05.2019
Washable, wearable battery-like devices could be woven directly into clothes
Washable, wearable battery-like devices could be woven directly into clothes
Researchers have developed washable, wearable 'batteries' based on cheap, safe and environmentally friendly inks and woven directly into fabrics. The devices could be used for flexible circuits, healthcare monitoring, energy conversion, and other applications. The team, led by Dr Felice Torrisi , who recently joined Imperial from the University of Cambridge, have shown how graphene - an atom-thick sheet of carbon - and other related materials can be directly incorporated into fabrics.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.05.2019
Leaving school earlier could increase the risk of heart disease
Leaving school earlier could increase the risk of heart disease
Although it has been known for a long time, that education, and socioeconomic position affect health, particularly in later life, there was limited knowledge as to why. New research has found that increased levels of BMI, blood pressure and smoking partly explain why people who left school at an earlier age could be at an increased risk of heart disease.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.05.2019
More years spent in education associated with lower weight and blood pressure
Scientists have helped unravel the link between higher levels of education and reduced risk of heart attack and stroke. Previous research showed every 3.6 years spent in education can reduce a person's lifetime risk of heart disease by a third.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 22.05.2019
Source of new CFC emissions
Source of new CFC emissions
Since 2013, annual emissions of a banned chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) have increased by around 7 Australia and Switzerland. Last year, it was reported that emissions of one of the most important ozone depleting substances, CFC-11, had increased. This chemical was used primarily as a foaming agent for building insulation, refrigerators and other consumer products.

Health - 22.05.2019
Largest report of its kind reveals the issues affecting adolescents today
Schools and society as a whole have a role to play in helping young people tackle numerous challenges around their health and wellbeing, researchers say. The School Health Research Network is led by Professor Simon Murphy at Cardiff University and is the largest network of its type in the world. The network includes every Welsh secondary school and conducts a biennial survey in partnership with Welsh Government and Public Health Wales.

Physics - Life Sciences - 21.05.2019
Cells develop a 'thicker skin' under extreme gravity
Cells develop a ’thicker skin’ under extreme gravity
A high-gravity experiment has revealed how cells keep their shape under pressure. Scientists have probed how cells respond to high gravity with a technique that could transform how we look at cellular life. Using the European Space Agency's (ESA) Large Diameter Centrifuge in the Netherlands, Imperial and ESA researchers spun cells at high speeds that simulate a gravitational force 15 times stronger than on Earth (15g).

Health - 21.05.2019
To help uncover childhood risks for self-harm or eating disorders
A new study led by the University of Bristol will help uncover risk factors and links between self-harm and eating disorders. New funding from the Medical Research Council (MRC) now allows for complex modelling and analysis of Bristol's Children of the 90s questionnaires and clinic data, to further our understanding of factors leading to self harm and eating disorders in children and teenagers.

Health - 21.05.2019
LeDeR annual report indicates ongoing concerns over deaths
LeDeR annual report indicates ongoing concerns over deaths
Findings published today in the Learning Disabilities Mortality Review (LeDeR) Programme's 2018 annual report indicate ongoing concerns about the premature deaths of people with learning disabilities. The University of Bristol analyses the findings from completed reviews of deaths and publishes these in its annual reports.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.05.2019
Head injury effects halted by xenon gas, finds first ever lifelong study in mice
Head injury effects halted by xenon gas, finds first ever lifelong study in mice
Following traumatic brain injury (TBI), xenon prevented early death, improved long-term cognition, and protected brain tissue in mice in a new study. TBI is the leading cause of death and disability in people under 45 in developed countries. The primary injury, caused by the initial force from a fall or car accident for example, is followed by a secondary injury which develops in the minutes, hours and days afterwards.

Innovation / Technology - Environment - 20.05.2019
Expert judgement provides better understanding of the effect of melting ice sheets
Expert judgement provides better understanding of the effect of melting ice sheets
Melting ice sheets in Greenland and the Antarctic, and subsequent sea level rise (SLR) this will cause, is widely recognised as posing a significant threat to coastal communities and ecosystems. Strategies and measures to mitigate and plan for the potential impacts are reliant on scientific projections of future SLR - conventionally provided using numerical modelling.

Chemistry - 20.05.2019
More detailed picture of Earth’s mantle
The chemical composition of the Earth's mantle is a lot more variable and diverse than previously thought, a new study has revealed. According to a new analysis of cores drilled through the ocean crust, the mantle is made up of distinct sections of rock each with different chemical make-ups. The chemical composition of the mantle has been notoriously difficult to determine with a high degree of certainty because it is largely inaccessible.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 20.05.2019
New method simplifies the search for protein receptor complexes, speeding drug development
For a drug to intervene in cells or entire organs that are not behaving normally, it must first bind to specific protein receptors in the cell membranes. Receptors can change their molecular structure in a multitude of ways during binding - and only the right structure will “unlock” the drug's therapeutic effect.

Health - 20.05.2019
Using activity monitors to track cats’ activity levels
Does your cat live indoors' Researchers from the University of Bristol Vet School want to hear from indoor cat owners for a new study looking at cats' mobility levels using cat activity monitors. The researchers want to study the effect of joint disease on cats' activity levels by using activity monitors to measure the movements of cats with and without mobility problems.

Pedagogy - 19.05.2019
The negative impact of positive Ofsted ratings
As GCSE exam season starts this week, new research has found a positive Ofsted rating can have a surprising negative impact on students. Parents with kids in schools that received a better than expected Ofsted report are much more likely to reduce help with homework and this can have a damaging impact on GCSE results.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.05.2019
Cancer drug could be repurposed to provide treatment for brain aneurysms
Cancer drug could be repurposed to provide treatment for brain aneurysms
Cancer drug could be repurposed to provide treatment for brain aneurysms, new research suggests An important class of drug used to treat cancer patients could be used to treat brain aneurysms, according to new research published this week. Brain aneurysms are a bulge in a blood vessel caused by a weakness in the blood vessel wall.

Life Sciences - 17.05.2019
Bedbugs evolved more than 100 million years ago - and walked the earth with T.Rex
Bedbugs evolved more than 100 million years ago - and walked the earth with T.Rex
International research finds bedbugs evolved more than 100 million years ago - and walked the earth with T.Rex Bedbugs - some of the most unwanted human bedfellows - have been parasitic companions with other species asides from humans for more than 100 million years, walking the earth at the same time as dinosaurs.

Health - Life Sciences - 16.05.2019
Cooling baby treatment one of ‘Nation's Lifesavers'
Cooling baby treatment one of ‘Nation’s Lifesavers’
A University of Bristol researcher who discovered that cooling babies who have suffered a lack of oxygen at birth improves their survival without brain damage in later childhood, is named by Universities UK as one of the 'Nation's Lifesavers'. One in 1,000 babies born at full term in the UK suffer brain injury as a result of being severely deprived of oxygen.

History / Archeology - Chemistry - 16.05.2019
Reveals what was on the menu for medieval peasants
Scientists from the University of Bristol have uncovered, for the first time, definitive evidence that determines what types of food medieval peasants ate and how they managed their animals. Using chemical analysis of pottery fragments and animal bones found at one of England's earliest medieval villages, combined with detailed examination of a range of historical documents and accounts, the research has revealed the daily diet of peasants in the Middle Ages.
1 2 3 4 5 ... 22 Next »