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Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
21.07.2017
University of Bath licences detection kit for sugar-damaged proteins
University of Bath licences detection kit for sugar-damaged proteins
The University of Bath today announced it had entered a licensing agreement with Abcam , an innovator in reagents and tools, to make a new fluorescent detection probe kit for researchers globally. The product developed by scientists at the University of Bath, will help researchers quickly and efficiently detect proteins damaged by sugar, which are associated with many degenerative diseases.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
21.07.2017
Causes of severe antisocial behaviour may differ for boys and girls
Causes of severe antisocial behaviour may differ for boys and girls
The causes of severe antisocial behaviour may differ between boys and girls, which could pave the way for new sex-specific treatments, according to a major new study published today (Friday 21 July). Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-techniques to map the brains of over 200 teenagers aged 14 - 18 years, researchers from our Department of Psychology and several other European universities conducted the most comprehensive study ever to analyse differences in brain development between children with conduct disorder (CD) and a group of typically-developing children (the control group).
Social Sciences
20.07.2017
Young people want more choice in GCSE experience
A new study by researchers from the Wales Institute of Social and Economic Research, Data and Methods (WISERD) at Cardiff University and Queen's University Belfast has found that students in Wales and Northern Ireland want more choice and fairness when it comes to their GCSE experience, including the subject selection process and the pressure to take on particular academic subjects.
Medicine/Pharmacology
20.07.2017
Study investigates link between antidepressant use in pregnancy and autism
Study investigates link between antidepressant use in pregnancy and autism
Children exposed to antidepressants during pregnancy seem to be at a slightly higher risk of autism than children of mothers with psychiatric disorders who were not treated with antidepressants during pregnancy, according to a University of Bristol study published in The BMJ today. However, the researchers stress that the absolute risk of autism was small, so these results should not be considered alarming.
Medicine/Pharmacology
20.07.2017
Moderate exercise and dieting reduces risk of caesarean section and diabetes in pregnancy
Moderate exercise and dieting reduces risk of caesarean section and diabetes in pregnancy
Pregnant women who have a healthy diet and regular moderate exercise are less likely to have a caesarean section, gain excessive weight, or develop diabetes in pregnancy, according to a study led by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) using data from over 12,000 women. The study, published in the BMJ , is the largest research project in the world looking at lifestyle interventions in pregnancy, involving more than 50 researchers from 41 institutions*.
Business/Economics - Careers/Employment
20.07.2017
Individual personal pensions fare worse than group pensions, shows research
Individual personal pensions fare worse than group pensions, shows research
People who take out an individual personal pension can expect lower returns than those who invest in a group personal pension plan, suggests new research from the University of Bath's School of Management. Individual investors are losing out The study finds that individual investors lose out by over 1 per cent a year in comparison with group personal pension plans negotiated by employers, even before differences in fees are taken into account.
Physics/Materials Science - Computer Science/Telecom
19.07.2017
Imaging breakthrough reveals magnets’ internal patterns
A new imaging technique has helped scientists make a breakthrough in how they visualise the directions of magnetisation inside an object. Magnets play a vital role in everyday life, are used in everything from hard drives to energy production, and scientists have already been able to study the structure of thin films of magnetic materials.
Environment/Sustainable Development
19.07.2017
Pangolins at 'huge risk' as study reveals dramatic increases in hunting across Central Africa
Pangolins at ’huge risk’ as study reveals dramatic increases in hunting across Central Africa
Pangolins at 'huge risk' as study reveals dramatic increases in hunting across Central Africa The hunting of pangolins, the world's most illegally traded mammal, has increased by 150 percent in Central African forests from 1970s to 2014, according to a new study led by the University of Sussex. The first-ever study of its kind , published in Conservation Letters , shows the true scale of local pangolin exploitation across the continent.
Philosophy
18.07.2017
Hearing a sound can alter perception of finger size
Hearing a sound can alter perception of finger size
Hearing an ascending sound while pulling their own finger can make a person think their finger is longer than it is, finds a new study led by UCL and the Institute of Philosophy, School of Advanced Study, University of London. The study, published in Scientific Reports and funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC), provides the first evidence that an artificial sound, unrelated to the sound of body movements, can alter how a person perceives their own body when the sound is arbitrarily paired with a bodily action.
Physics/Materials Science - Environment/Sustainable Development
18.07.2017
Non-toxic alternative for next-generation solar cells
Non-toxic alternative for next-generation solar cells
Researchers have demonstrated how a non-toxic alternative to lead could form the basis of next-generation solar cells.  We're just scratching the surface of what these compounds can do. Robert Hoye The team of researchers, from the University of Cambridge and the United States, have used theoretical and experimental methods to show how bismuth - the so-called ‘green element' which sits next to lead on the periodic table, could be used in low-cost solar cells.
Media
18.07.2017
One third of fake images go undetected in recent study
A third of manipulated images go undetected in new University of Warwick research Researchers took photos of real world scenes and edited them in different ways - showed a group of participants a variety of original and altered images 58% of the original, unaltered images were identified - and only 65% of the manipulated photos were spotted (just above results participants would get from choosing randomly) Photo manipulation is easier now than e
Life Sciences
18.07.2017
Genes account for half of differences in social mobility
A new King's College London study suggests that genes account for nearly 50 per cent of the differences between whether children are socially mobile or not. One of the best predictors of children's educational attainment is their parents' educational level and in the past this association was thought to be environmental, rather than influenced by genes.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
17.07.2017
Two new genes linked to Alzheimer’s risk
A team of researchers led by Cardiff University has identified two genes that influence a person's risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. The new finding, which builds on the team's previous work of identifying 24 susceptibility genes, enables a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the disease and offers further hope in developing new treatments.
Law/Forensics
17.07.2017
Hundred-year-old law on fluid flow overturned by Imperial research
Hundred-year-old law on fluid flow overturned by Imperial research
Engineers from Imperial College London have dispelled a 100-year-old scientific law used to describe how fluid flows through rocks. The three 3D models below show fluid flowing through rocks at different microscopic scales. The discovery by researchers from Imperial could lead to a range of improvements including advances in Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS).
Life Sciences - Psychology
17.07.2017
Humans hardwired to lean to the right while kissing the world over
Humans hardwired to lean to the right while kissing the world over
If you lean in for a kiss on the left you may be in the minority. A new study from an international team of psychologists and neuroscientists suggest that humans are hardwired to favour leaning to the right while kissing romantic partners, which may have wider implications for neuroscience and cognitive sciences.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
14.07.2017
Protein may protect against heart attack
DDK3 could be used as a new therapy to stop the build-up of fatty material inside the arteries A naturally occurring protein, dickkopf-related protein 3 (DKK3), could hold the key to protecting against heart attacks and strokes caused by atherosclerosis, according to new research by King's College London researchers.
History/Archeology - Life Sciences
14.07.2017
Synchrotron light used to show human domestication of seeds from 2000BC
Synchrotron light used to show human domestication of seeds from 2000BC
The UK's synchrotron facility, Diamond Light Source, has been used by scientists at UCL to document for the first time the rate of evolution of seed coat thinning, a major marker of crop domestication from archaeological remains.  Writing in the journal Scientific Reports , the authors present evidence for seed coat thinning between 2,000 BC and 1,200 BC in the legume horsegram (Macrotyloma uniflorum), a bean commonly eaten in southern India.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Agronomy/Food Science
13.07.2017
Body size and prostate cancer risk
Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in Europe and the second most frequently diagnosed cancer in men worldwide. A new study led by researchers in the Nuffield Department of Population Health Cancer Epidemiology Unit (CEU) investigated the associations of height and obesity with prostate cancer by different tumour characteristics and death from prostate cancer and found that taller men and men with more fat are at greater risk of high grade prostate cancer and death from prostate cancer.
Environment/Sustainable Development - History/Archeology
13.07.2017
Diet of the ancient people of Rapa Nui (Easter Island) shows adaptation and resilience not 'ecocide'
Diet of the ancient people of Rapa Nui (Easter Island) shows adaptation and resilience not ’ecocide’
Research by an international team, led by the University of Bristol, has shed new light on the fate of the ancient people of Rapa Nui (Easter Island). It had been proposed that vast forests of giant palm trees were cut down by the people of Rapa Nui leaving them among other things without canoes. With no canoes, they could no longer fish so they ate chickens, rats and agricultural crops.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
12.07.2017
Targeting 'broken' metabolism in immune cells reduces inflammatory disease
Targeting ’broken’ metabolism in immune cells reduces inflammatory disease
Scientists have found a way to 'program' immune cells to cause less damage to the body, by tapping into a 'broken' chemical pathway in inflammation The team, led by researchers at Imperial College London, Queen Mary University of London and Ergon Pharmaceuticals , believes the approach could offer new hope in the treatment of inflammatory conditions like arthritis , autoimmune diseases and sepsis.
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