Medicine - Sep 21
A new outbreak of a rare but preventable eye infection that can cause blindness, has been identified in contact lens wearers in a new study led by UCL and Moorfields Eye Hospital researchers. The research team found a threefold increase in Acanthamoeba keratitis since 2011 in South-East England. Reusable contact lens wearers with the eye infection are more likely to have used an ineffective contact lens solution, have contaminated their lenses with water or reported poor contact lens hygiene, according to the findings published today in the British Journal of Ophthalmology .
Environment - Sep 21
Environment

Land-based bird populations are becoming confined to nature reserves in some parts of the world - raising the risk of global extinction - due to the loss of suitable habitat, according to a report led by UCL.

Medicine - Sep 21

Removing displays of tobacco products from shops may have reduced the proportion of children buying cigarettes by 17 per cent.

Medicine - Sep 21

Researchers from the University of Oxford's Department of Zoology have demonstrated pre-clinical success for a universal flu vaccine.

Medicine - Sep 20

Researchers at the University of Cambridge and the University of Oxford have discovered a new molecule that plays a key role in the immune response that is triggered by influenza infections.


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Medicine / Pharmacology - 21.09.2018
Outbreak of preventable eye infection in contact lens wearers
A new outbreak of a rare but preventable eye infection that can cause blindness, has been identified in contact lens wearers in a new study led by UCL and Moorfields Eye Hospital researchers. The research team found a threefold increase in Acanthamoeba keratitis since 2011 in South-East England. Reusable contact lens wearers with the eye infection are more likely to have used an ineffective contact lens solution, have contaminated their lenses with water or reported poor contact lens hygiene, according to the findings published today in the British Journal of Ophthalmology .

Environment - Life Sciences - 21.09.2018
Land-based bird populations are at risk of local extinction
Land-based bird populations are at risk of local extinction
Land-based bird populations are becoming confined to nature reserves in some parts of the world - raising the risk of global extinction - due to the loss of suitable habitat, according to a report led by UCL. Researchers analysed biodiversity in the area known as Sundaland, which covers the peninsula of Thailand, Borneo, Malaysia, Sumatra, Java and Bali, one of the world's most biologically degraded regions.

Medicine / Pharmacology - 21.09.2018
Pre-clinical success for universal flu vaccine offers hope
Researchers from the University of Oxford's Department of Zoology have demonstrated pre-clinical success for a universal flu vaccine. Influenza is thought to be a highly variable virus, able to mutate and escape immunity built up in the population due to its circulation in previous seasons. However, influenza seasons tend to be dominated by a limited number of antigenically and genetically distinct influenza viruses.

Medicine / Pharmacology - 21.09.2018
Tobacco display ban linked to fewer children buying cigarettes in shops
Removing displays of tobacco products from shops may have reduced the proportion of children buying cigarettes by 17 per cent. These are the findings of a new study from Imperial College London. The research, the first analysis of the impact of the 2015 tobacco display ban in England, assessed survey responses from 18,000 11-15 year olds from across England between 2010 and 2016.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 20.09.2018
Influenza virus molecules set immune response into overdrive
Researchers at the University of Cambridge and the University of Oxford have discovered a new molecule that plays a key role in the immune response that is triggered by influenza infections. The molecule, a so-called mini viral RNA, is capable of inducing inflammation and cell death, and was produced at high levels by the 1918 pandemic influenza virus.

Life Sciences - Medicine / Pharmacology - 20.09.2018
Most advanced brain imaging study in Wales
Using some of the most advanced neuroimaging equipment in the world, researchers at Cardiff University's Brain Imaging Research Centre (CUBRIC) are set to study the brain function and structure of 170 healthy volunteers as part of a research project to uncover the mysteries that still surround our most complex organ.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 19.09.2018
Moderate warming, if sustained, could melt the ’sleeping giant’ of Antarctica
Imperial experts have predicted that sustained Antarctic warming of just 2C could melt the largest ice sheet on earth. New research on Antarctic sediment layers has shown that the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS), also known as Antarctica's ‘sleeping giant', retreated during extended warm periods in the past - when temperatures were like those predicted for this century.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 19.09.2018
Discovery could explain failed clinical trials for Alzheimer's
Researchers at King's College London have discovered a vicious feedback loop underlying brain degeneration in Alzheimer's disease which may explain why so many drug trials have failed. The study also identifies a clinically approved drug which breaks the vicious cycle and protects against memory-loss in animal models of Alzheimer's.

Environment - 19.09.2018
Why do we love bees but hate wasps?
A lack of understanding of the important role of wasps in the ecosystem and economy is a fundamental reason why they are universally despised whereas bees are much loved, according to UCL-led research. Both bees and wasps are two of humanity's most ecologically and economically important organisms. They both pollinate our flowers and crops, but wasps also regulate populations of crop pests and insects that carry human diseases.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 18.09.2018
’High-yield’ farming costs the environment less than previously thought - and could help spare habitats
New findings suggest that more intensive agriculture might be the "least bad" option for feeding the world while saving its species - provided use of such "land-efficient" systems prevents further conversion of wilderness to farmland. Agriculture that appears to be more eco-friendly but uses more land may actually have greater environmental costs per unit of food than "high-yield" farming that uses less land, a new study has found.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 18.09.2018
’Significant breakthrough’ in understanding the deadly nature of pandemic influenza
Researchers at the University of Cambridge and the University of Oxford have discovered a new molecule that plays a key role in the immune response that is triggered by influenza infections. The molecule, a so-called mini viral RNA, is capable of inducing inflammation and cell death, and was produced at high levels by the 1918 pandemic influenza virus.

Computer Science / Telecom - 18.09.2018
Mathematicians calculate the safest way home
A mobile app that guides pedestrians along the safest instead of quickest route to their destination is being developed by researchers at Cardiff University. Maths and computer science experts have devised a way of scoring the safety of any given area using sophisticated mathematical algorithms, which they believe could easily be implemented into a navigation mobile app to help reduce road traffic casualties.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 18.09.2018
Drugs that stop mosquitoes catching malaria could help eradicate the disease
Drugs that stop mosquitoes catching malaria could help eradicate the disease
Researchers have identified compounds that could prevent malaria parasites from being able to infect mosquitoes, halting the spread of disease. Preventing transmission of malaria is a key part of efforts to eliminate the disease. A person can be cured of the disease using drugs that wipe out the replicating form of the parasite, but still carry dormant, sexual forms.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 18.09.2018
40,000 people urged to sign-up to the largest study of depression and anxiety
Researchers at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), King's College London and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) BioResource are calling for 40,000 people with depression or anxiety to join the online Genetic Links to Anxiety and Depression (GLAD) Study, funded by the NIHR.

Psychology - 18.09.2018
People are predisposed to forgive
When assessing the moral character of others, people cling to good impressions but readily adjust their opinions about those who have behaved badly, according to new research. This flexibility in judging transgressors might help explain both how humans forgive - and why they sometimes stay in bad relationships.

Medicine / Pharmacology - 18.09.2018
New brain research suggests that schizophrenia is an extreme version of a common personality type
Researchers have found that the signals in people's brains differ depending on a particular aspect of an individual's personality, termed Schizotypy, a discovery that could improve the way schizophrenia is characterised and treated. The study - Attenuated Post-Movement Beta Rebound associated with schizotypal features in healthy people - published in Schizophrenia Bulletin was led by the University of Nottingham and the findings suggest that many mental illnesses may be thought of as extreme variants of a normal personality.

Palaeontology - Earth Sciences - 17.09.2018
Tiny fossils reveal how shrinking was essential for successful evolution
Tiny fossils reveal how shrinking was essential for successful evolution
A new study published today in Nature, using research carried out at the University of Bristol, shows that getting smaller was a key factor contributing to the exceptional evolution of mammals over the last 200 million years. The origin of modern mammals can be traced back more than 200 million years to the age of dinosaurs.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 17.09.2018
Undiagnosed STIs can increase negative PMS symptoms
Women that have undiagnosed sexually transmitted infections may be at greater risk of experiencing negative premenstrual symptoms (PMS), according to new Oxford University research. The study was conducted as part of a long term partnership with the female health, fertility and period-tracking app, CLUE.

Medicine / Pharmacology - 17.09.2018
Antibodies may cut heart attack risk
Antibodies could protect against heart attacks, according to a study by researchers from Imperial College London. The researchers, funded by the British Heart Foundation , studied patients with high blood pressure, of whom 87 had developed coronary heart disease. They also studied a further 143 patients who had their heart arteries extensively studied using cutting edge techniques.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 17.09.2018
'High-yield' farming costs the environment less than previously thought - and could help spare habitats
New research involving dairy experts at the University of Nottingham suggests that more intensive agriculture might be the ‘least bad' option for feeding the world, while saving its species - provided use of such “land-efficient” systems prevents further conversion of wilderness to farmland.
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