Environment - Jul 20
Environment
Under warmer conditions, plants can take up more carbon dioxide by using carbon more efficiently for growth, shows a new study. Plants take in - or ‘fix' - carbon dioxide from the atmosphere during photosynthesis. Some of the carbon is used for plant growth, and some of it is used in respiration, where the plant breaks down sugars to get energy.
Business - Jul 20

Pupils who have immigrated to the UK have a significantly more positive attitude towards school than their peers whose parents were born here, new research has revealed.

Life Sciences - Jul 19
Life Sciences

A Eight hundred year old Norwegian skeleton found to have traces of Salmonella. This research Reshapes understanding of the bacterial pathogen Salmonella enterica.

Pedagogy - Jul 20

Teenagers who regularly clash with their parents are more likely to have given time to a charity or humanitarian cause, a study has shown.

Earth Sciences - Jul 19

Groundwater pumped from the depths of the coastal Bengal Basin supporting more than 80 million people is largely secure from contamination, according to new research by UCL and the British Geological Survey.


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Environment - Earth Sciences - 20.07.2018
How plants use carbon affects their response to climate change
How plants use carbon affects their response to climate change
Under warmer conditions, plants can take up more carbon dioxide by using carbon more efficiently for growth, shows a new study. Plants take in - or ‘fix' - carbon dioxide from the atmosphere during photosynthesis. Some of the carbon is used for plant growth, and some of it is used in respiration, where the plant breaks down sugars to get energy.

Business / Economics - Social Sciences - 20.07.2018
Immigrant pupils more likely to think school can help them succeed than UK-born peers
Pupils who have immigrated to the UK have a significantly more positive attitude towards school than their peers whose parents were born here, new research has revealed. Experts from the University of Bristol and the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) analysed data from over 4,500 pupils aged 15 and 16 in 204 schools in England* and found immigration status is a key driver of attitude.

Pedagogy - Social Sciences - 20.07.2018
Young people who frequently argue with their parents are better citizens, research finds
Teenagers who regularly clash with their parents are more likely to have given time to a charity or humanitarian cause, a study has shown. The survey of 13 and 14 year-olds carried out by academics at Cardiff University, showed those who argued “a lot” with their mother and father, compared to those who “never” argued, were also more likely to have been involved with a human rights organisation in the past 12 months and to have contacted a politician or signed a petition.

Life Sciences - Medicine / Pharmacology - 19.07.2018
Evidence of Salmonella Paratyphi C found for the first time in medieval northern Europe
A Eight hundred year old Norwegian skeleton found to have traces of Salmonella. This research Reshapes understanding of the bacterial pathogen Salmonella enterica. Genome research conducted by the University of Warwick suggests that enteric fever, a potentially lethal disease more commonly found in hot countries, was present in medieval Europe.

Earth Sciences - 19.07.2018
Deep groundwater in coastal deltas resilient to contamination
Groundwater pumped from the depths of the coastal Bengal Basin supporting more than 80 million people is largely secure from contamination, according to new research by UCL and the British Geological Survey. The study shows that groundwater pumped from depths below 150m in the coastal regions of the Bengal Basin is thousands of years old, and generally secure from contamination by salinity and arsenic found in shallow groundwater.

Life Sciences - Environment - 19.07.2018
New insights into plants' conquest of land
New insights into plants’ conquest of land
The Earth is filled with diverse and remarkable plant forms from the tallest redwoods that pierce forest canopies, to the smallest mosses that blanket the ground underfoot. However, these striking forms came from much simpler origins. The ancestors of land plants were string-like (2D), aquatic green algae that looked very different from the three-dimensional (3D), upright stems and leaves of plants we are familiar with today.

Environment - Administration / Government - 19.07.2018
Workers’ rights should be at the heart of global sustainable development, says new report
Workers' rights should be at the heart of global sustainable development, says new report (17 July 2018) Workers' rights should be placed at the heart of global efforts to improve sustainable development, according to a new international study. The Unacceptable Forms of Work: Global Dialogue/Location Innovation report , led by Durham University, UK, came as the world's politicians met to review progress towards the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) .

Medicine / Pharmacology - 19.07.2018
Using adrenaline in cardiac arrests results in less than 1% more people leaving hospital alive - but nearly doubles the survivors’ risk of severe brain damage
Using adrenaline in cardiac arrests results in less than 1% more people leaving hospital alive - but nearly doubles the survivors' risk of severe brain damage A clinical trial of the use of adrenaline in cardiac arrests has found that its use results in less than 1% more people leaving hospital alive - but almost doubles the risk of severe brain damage for survivors of cardiac arrest.

Careers / Employment - Business / Economics - 19.07.2018
Most employees can work smarter, given the chance
More than half (58%) of employees in Britain can identify changes at work which would make them more productive, a research team drawn from UCL Institute of Education (IOE), Cardiff University and Nuffield College, Oxford has found. These findings are published today in the Skills and Employment Survey (2017).

Chemistry - Computer Science / Telecom - 18.07.2018
Robot chemist discovers new molecules and reactions
Robot chemist discovers new molecules and reactions
A new type of artificial-intelligence-driven chemistry could revolutionise the way molecules are discovered, scientists claim. In a new paper published today in the journal Nature , chemists from the University of Glasgow discuss how they have trained an artificially-intelligent organic chemical synthesis robot to automatically explore a very large number of chemical reactions.

Religions - 18.07.2018
Secular countries can expect future economic growth, confirms new study
New research measuring the importance of religion in 109 countries spanning the entire 20th century has reignited an age-old debate around the link between secularisation and economic growth. The study, published in Science Advances, has shown that a decline in religion influences a country's future economic prosperity.

Innovation / Technology - Medicine / Pharmacology - 18.07.2018
New technology can keep an eye on babies’ movements in the womb
A new system for monitoring fetal movements in the womb, developed by Imperial researchers, could make keeping an eye on high-risk pregnancies easier. Our device is the first to use acoustic sensors to detect movements. Dr Niamh Nolan Department of Bioengineering Monitoring the movements of babies in the womb is crucial to providing medical help when it's needed.

Medicine / Pharmacology - 18.07.2018
Diabetes raises risk of cancer, with women at higher risk than men
A global review involving almost 20 million people has shown that having diabetes significantly raises the risk of developing cancer, and for women the risk is even higher. Researchers from The George Institute for Global Health also found diabetes (type 1 and type 2) conferred an additional risk for women, compared to men, for leukaemia and cancers of the stomach, mouth and kidney, but less risk for liver cancer.

Medicine / Pharmacology - 18.07.2018
Sugar improves memory in over-60s – helping them work smarter
A small dose of sugar can improve memory in older adults, motivate them to work harder and puts them in a good mood when performing difficult tasks Researchers gave participants a drink containing a small amount of glucose and got them to perform memory tasks - found improvements in memory, mood and level of engagement Short-term energy in the form of raised blood sugar levels could be an important factor in older adults' motivation to perform a

Innovation / Technology - Physics / Materials Science - 18.07.2018
Solar supercapacitor could power future of wearable sensors
A new form of solar-powered supercapacitor could help make future wearable technologies lighter and more energy-efficient, scientists say.‌ In a paper published in the journal Nano Energy, researchers from the University of Glasgow's Bendable Electronics and Sensing Technologies (BEST) group describe how they have developed a promising new type of graphene supercapacitor, which could be used in the next generation of wearable health sensors.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 18.07.2018
Novel botulinum compound relieves chronic pain
A modified form of botulinum toxin gives long-lasting pain relief in mice without adverse effects and, in time, could replace opioid drugs as a safe and effective way of treating chronic pain, according to research by UCL, the University of Sheffield and the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto.

Business / Economics - 17.07.2018
Londoners feel ignored and not represented by adverts
Londoners feel ignored and not represented by adverts
75 per cent of Londoners feel that adverts should reflect the diversity of the city's population, yet fewer than one in four thinks adverts are culturally diverse, according to new research from the UCL Institute of Education. The research, which was commissioned by the London Mayor and the Greater London Authority, highlights the pressure that women and girls feel to achieve a specific beauty standard.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 17.07.2018
Allergic responses linked to skin cancer protection and ’Toxin Hypothesis’
The components of the immune system that trigger allergic reactions may also help protect the skin against cancer, suggest new findings. The research, led by Imperial College London , highlights previously unknown skin defences - and could open avenues for developing new skin cancer treatments.

Medicine / Pharmacology - 17.07.2018
A passion for helping patients leads to academic success
Alexandra Pyle believes it is never too late to change career. A mature student who began her nursing career in her forties, she collected her master's degree in Wound Healing and Tissue Repair during Cardiff University's graduation week. The 58-year-old, who lives in Ely, Cardiff, said: “This is a really proud moment for me.

Medicine / Pharmacology - 17.07.2018
Gosport may have a negative impact on end-of-life care in general practice
Researchers from the University of Bristol have highlighted the potentially negative impact the deaths at Gosport War Memorial Hospital may have on end-of-life care delivered at home. In an editorial published in the British Journal of General Practice today [Tuesday 17 July], they call for better training for GPs and community nurses to address any anxieties they may have about prescribing and administering opioids for pain relief to terminally ill patients.
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