news


Category


Years
2018 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012/2012 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

Last News


Results 1 - 20 of 517.
1 2 3 4 5 ... 26 Next »

Medicine/Pharmacology
22.02.2018
Antidepressants more effective in treating depression than placebo
A major study comparing 21 commonly used antidepressants concludes that all are more effective than placebo for the short-term treatment of acute depression in adults, with effectiveness ranging from small to moderate for different drugs. The international study, published in The Lancet , is a network meta-analysis of 522 double-blind, randomised controlled trials comprising a total of 116477 participants.
Medicine/Pharmacology
22.02.2018
Stretchable health sensor could improve monitoring of chronic conditions
A new type of flexible, wearable sensor could help people with chronic conditions like diabetes avoid the discomfort of regular pin-prick blood tests by monitoring the chemical composition of their sweat instead. In a new paper published in the journal Biosensors and Bioelectronics, a team of scientists from the University of Glasgow's School of Engineering outline how they have built a stretchable, wireless system which is capable of measuring the pH level of users' sweat.
Life Sciences - History/Archeology
22.02.2018
Beaker culture in Britain came about through large-scale migration
Beaker culture in Britain came about through large-scale migration
Beaker pottery and culture spread through large-scale migration of people and through the exchange of new ideas, according to new research by an international team involving UCL scientists. The study involved analysis of ancient-DNA data from 400 prehistoric skeletons drawn from sites across Europe. It is the largest study of ancient human DNA ever conducted.
Medicine/Pharmacology
21.02.2018
Stroke survivors and caregivers feel abandoned by health services, study finds
A systematic review of studies focused on stroke survivors' and carers' experiences of primary care and community healthcare services has found that they feel abandoned because they have become marginalised by services and do not have the knowledge or skills to re-engage.
Media
21.02.2018
Social media and internet not cause of political polarisation
New Oxford University research suggests that social media and the internet are not the root of today's fragmented society, and echo chambers may not be the threat they are perceived to be. In fact,only a small proportion of the population, at most, is influenced by echo chambers. The argument against echo chambers is well documented: helped by social media algorithms, we are increasingly choosing to interact in safe spaces, with people who think and act like us - effectively preaching our opinions to the converted.
Medicine/Pharmacology
20.02.2018
Light exercise may lower death risk in older men
Light exercise may lower death risk in older men
Clocking up just a few minutes at a time of any level of physical activity, including of light intensity, is linked to a lower risk of death in older men, suggests UCL-led research. The study, which was published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine , found that although there were greater benefits from doing moderate or more intense activity, even light intensity physical activity lowered the risk of death.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
20.02.2018
’Origami’ diagnostics breakthrough set to benefit developing-world farmers
Sheets of folded paper, printed with wax, could be the key to developing very low cost diagnostics to improve the health of livestock in in lowto middle-income countries. In a paper published in the journal ACS Sensors , biomedical engineers, veterinary scientists and bacteriologists from the UK and India describe how disposable diagnostic technology that uses paper folding, akin to origami, to process complex biochemical tests has helped farmers in India identify three separate reproductive infections in cattle.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
20.02.2018
In living colour: Brightly-colored bacteria could be used to 'grow' paints and coatings
In living colour: Brightly-colored bacteria could be used to ’grow’ paints and coatings
Researchers have unlocked the genetic code behind some of the brightest and most vibrant colours in nature. The paper , published in the journal PNAS, is the first study of the genetics of structural colour - as seen in butterfly wings and peacock feathers - and paves the way for genetic research in a variety of structurally coloured organisms.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
20.02.2018
In living colour: Brightly-coloured bacteria could be used to 'grow' paints and coatings
In living colour: Brightly-coloured bacteria could be used to ’grow’ paints and coatings
Researchers have unlocked the genetic code behind some of the brightest and most vibrant colours in nature. The paper , published in the journal PNAS, is the first study of the genetics of structural colour - as seen in butterfly wings and peacock feathers - and paves the way for genetic research in a variety of structurally coloured organisms.
Sport Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
20.02.2018
Fake news 'vaccine': online game may 'inoculate' by simulating propaganda tactics
Fake news ’vaccine’: online game may ’inoculate’ by simulating propaganda tactics
A new experiment, launching today online, aims to help 'inoculate' against disinformation by providing a small dose of perspective from a "fake news tycoon".
Life Sciences - History/Archeology
19.02.2018
Ancient genome study identifies traces of indigenous
Ancient genome study identifies traces of indigenous "Tano" in present-day Caribbean populations
A thousand-year-old tooth has provided genetic evidence that the so-called "Tano", the first indigenous Americans to feel the full impact of European colonisation after Columbus arrived in the New World, still have living descendants in the Caribbean today. It has always been clear that people in the Caribbean have Native American ancestry, but it was difficult to prove whether this was specifically indigenous to the Caribbean, until now.
Life Sciences - Environment/Sustainable Development
19.02.2018
Plants colonised the earth 100 million years earlier than previously thought
Plants colonised the earth 100 million years earlier than previously thought
A new study on the timescale of plant evolution, led by the University of Bristol, has concluded that the first plants to colonise the Earth originated around 500 million years ago - 100 million years earlier than previously thought. For the first four billion years of Earth's history, our planet's continents would have been devoid of all life except microbes.
Life Sciences
19.02.2018
The greening of planet Earth
The first plants to colonise the planet originated around 500 million years ago, much earlier than has previously been suggested by the fossil record, a new study has suggested. For the first four billion years of Earth's history, the planet's continents would have been devoid of all life except microbes.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
19.02.2018
Calcium may play a role in the development of Parkinson's disease
Calcium may play a role in the development of Parkinson’s disease
Researchers have found that excess levels of calcium in brain cells may lead to the formation of toxic clusters that are the hallmark of Parkinson's disease. This is the first time we've seen that calcium influences the way alpha-synuclein behaves. Janin Lautenschl'ger The international team, led by the University of Cambridge, found that calcium can mediate the interaction between small membranous structures inside nerve endings, which are important for neuronal signalling in the brain, and alpha-synuclein, the protein associated with Parkinson's disease.
Life Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
19.02.2018
Blood and urine tests developed to indicate autism in children
o Test believed to be the first of its kind o Link found between autism and damage to proteins in blood plasma o Could lead to earlier diagnosis of the condition New tests which can indicate autism in children have been developed by researchers at the University of Warwick. The academic team who conducted the international research believe that their new blood and urine tests which search for damage to proteins are the first of their kind.
Life Sciences - Environment/Sustainable Development
17.02.2018
Hope remains to save the world's most trafficked animal as it enjoys the spotlight of a global day in its honour
Hope remains to save the world’s most trafficked animal as it enjoys the spotlight of a global day in its honour
Hope remains to save the world's most trafficked animal as it enjoys the spotlight of a global day in its honour Did you know that the world's most trafficked animal is having its own international day today? On World Pangolin Day , the University of Sussex is determined to raise awareness of the mammal's plight as they face a desperate fight against extinction.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
16.02.2018
Regional brain shrinkage in MS predicts disability
Regional brain shrinkage in MS predicts disability
A UCL-led research team has identified the pattern of brain tissue loss in multiple sclerosis, enabling improved prediction of disability progression. The study, published in Annals of Neurology , was one of the largest brain imaging studies ever conducted investigating multiple sclerosis (MS). "It's well known that brain atrophy occurs in people with MS and varies by region, but we typically only measure the shrinkage of the whole brain.
Chemistry
16.02.2018
Complex plants were first to conquer land
The first plants to conquer land were a much more complex species than has previously been assumed, new research has shown. Before the first land plants appeared on Earth around half a billion years ago, Earth would have looked unrecognisable with no grass, trees or even mosses. Up until now, mosses and their relatives the hornworts and liverworts have been regarded as the first true plants on dry land.
Environment/Sustainable Development
16.02.2018
Laser technology reveals the weight of some of UK's and world's biggest trees
Laser technology reveals the weight of some of UK’s and world’s biggest trees
New laser scanning technology is being used by UCL scientists to provide fresh and unprecedented insights into the structure and mass of trees, a development that will help plot how much carbon they absorb and how they might respond to climate change. Two studies, published today (Friday) by the Royal Society, by researchers at UCL and the universities of Oxford, Sonoma State, Ghent and Wageningen, reveal the technology has captured the 3D structure of individual trees in ways they have never been seen before.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
15.02.2018
UCL cancer trials to get £9m funding boost
UCL cancer trials to get £9m funding boost
Cancer Research UK is planning to invest nearly 9m over the next five years into research at the Cancer Research UK & UCL Cancer Trials Centre. The announcement is part of a 45 million investment into Cancer Research UK's network of clinical trials units across the UK, one of the charity's largest investments in clinical research to date.
1 2 3 4 5 ... 26 Next »