Medicine Apr 26
Researchers today generally agree that eating garlic, used for thousands of years to treat human disease, can reduce the risk of developing certain kinds of cancers, cardiovascular disease, and type 2 diabetes, but exactly how it does this is a still a mystery that needs more research.
Life Sciences Apr 26
Life Sciences

Horse lookin' at you kid: study finds horses remember facial expressions of people they've seen before.

Life Sciences Apr 26

Experts have equipped biotech workhorse bacteria with feedback control mechanism to balance growth with making protein products.

Life Sciences Apr 26

Researchers at the University of Oxford have proposed an evolutionary framework to understand why microbes living in the gut affect the brain and behaviour, published.

Medicine Apr 26

Older adults are largely obscured in the media representation of cancer and cancer experience, despite over three quarters of all cancers in the UK diagnosed in those aged over 60.


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Medicine/Pharmacology - Chemistry
18:01
The complicated biology of garlic
Researchers today generally agree that eating garlic, used for thousands of years to treat human disease, can reduce the risk of developing certain kinds of cancers, cardiovascular disease, and type 2 diabetes, but exactly how it does this is a still a mystery that needs more research.
Life Sciences
17:00
Horse lookin' at you kid: study finds horses remember facial expressions of people they've seen before
Horse lookin’ at you kid: study finds horses remember facial expressions of people they’ve seen before
Horse lookin' at you kid: study finds horses remember facial expressions of people they've seen before A study by the Universities of Sussex and Portsmouth reveals that horses can read and then remember people's emotional expressions, enabling them to use this information to identify people who could pose a potential threat.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
16:00
Can microbes manipulate our minds?
Researchers at the University of Oxford have proposed an evolutionary framework to understand why microbes living in the gut affect the brain and behaviour, published.  Katerina Johnson (Department of Experimental Psychology) and Kevin Foster (Department of Zoology) assessed data from studies on the gut-brain axis to suggest how 'that gut feeling' evolved.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
10:00
E. coli rewired to control growth as experts let them make proteins for medicine
Experts have equipped biotech workhorse bacteria with feedback control mechanism to balance growth with making protein products. Medicines like insulin and interferon are manufactured using genetically engineered bacteria, such as E. coli. E. coli grow quickly and can be given DNA that instructs them to make proteins used in medicines and other materials.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Media
07:01
Cancer risk in over 60s underrepresented despite high diagnosis rates
Older adults are largely obscured in the media representation of cancer and cancer experience, despite over three quarters of all cancers in the UK diagnosed in those aged over 60. The research, led by the University of Glasgow and funded by Cancer Research UK, found that articles featuring personal cancer stories more frequently focus on younger people.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Business/Economics
25.04.2018
Labelling alcoholic drinks as lower in strength could encourage people to drink more, study suggests
Labelling alcoholic drinks as lower in strength could encourage people to drink more, study suggests
Wines and beers labelled as lower in alcohol strength may increase the total amount of alcoholic drink consumed, according to a study published in the journal Health Psychology . The study was carried out by the Behaviour and Health Research Unit at the University of Cambridge in collaboration with the Centre for Addictive Behaviours Research at London South Bank University.
Astronomy - Physics/Materials Science
25.04.2018
UK astronomers giving everyone access to a 3-D map of the Milky Way
UK astronomers giving everyone access to a 3-D map of the Milky Way
A UK team of astronomers working on the European Space Agency Gaia mission have contributed to a revolution in our understanding of the Milky Way with the release today of a new census of the stars in our sky, thanks, in part, to work by physicists from the University of Bristol.
Medicine/Pharmacology
25.04.2018
Getting rid of malaria possible, if we try something new
The rapid elimination of potentially untreatable P. falciparum malaria in South-East Asia is possible, according to a ground-breaking new study published in The Lancet . The study authors say that setting up community-based malaria clinics for early diagnosis, treatment and monitoring, combined with mass antimalarial drug administration (MDA) to everyone living in 'hotspot' areas - even if they do not show signs of malaria - substantially reduced, often to zero, malaria incidence in remote Myanmar villages.
Astronomy
25.04.2018
Gaia's 3D census of over one billion stars in our Milky Way
Gaia’s 3D census of over one billion stars in our Milky Way
The positions and distances of over one billion stars in our Milky Way Galaxy have been released by the European Space Agency Gaia mission involving UCL researchers, creating the first 3D census of our home galaxy and opening a new window on the Universe. The data release allows astronomers to map the true 3D structure of our galaxy with unprecedented precision by providing information about 600 times more stars than previously available.
Medicine/Pharmacology
25.04.2018
Improving lung function in prematurely-born children
A Cardiff-based research project which aims to improve lung function in prematurely-born children is expanding to target more participants. Born Early Breathe Easy (Bebe), is aiming to establish if lung problems which are common in babies born early can be effectively treated. The research at Cardiff University and Bangor University is studying children aged seven to 12 to investigate how well their lungs function.
Astronomy - Innovation/Technology
25.04.2018
Gaia creates richest star map of our Galaxy - and beyond
The European Space Agency's Gaia mission has produced the richest star catalogue to date, including high-precision measurements of nearly 1.7 billion stars and revealing previously unseen details of our home Galaxy.  There is hardly a branch of astrophysics which will not be revolutionised by Gaia data.
Medicine/Pharmacology
25.04.2018
Hospitals often missing dementia despite prior diagnosis
Hospitals often missing dementia despite prior diagnosis
Hospitals in the UK are increasingly likely to recognise that a patient has dementia after they've been admitted for a different reason, finds a new UCL-led study, but it is still only recognised in under two-thirds of people. This is the first study to identify an improvement in dementia diagnosis in hospitals over time, and also found inequity between ethnic groups for the first time.
Business/Economics - Law/Forensics
25.04.2018
Clearing up online confusion for consumers - top tips from the experts
PA 75/18 Consumers often fail to see important information about online services - which can lead to unexpected costs, according to new research. When you are buying a service online, what do you look at on a website? Connection Services (for example) offer connection to a small number of organisation's customer service phone lines -for a cost.
Politics
24.04.2018
Climate change not the key driver of human conflict and displacement in East Africa
Climate change not the key driver of human conflict and displacement in East Africa
Over the last 50 years climate change has not been the key driver of the human displacement or conflict in East Africa, rather it is politics and poverty, according to new research by UCL. Human displacement refers to the total number of forcibly displaced people, and includes internally displaced people - the largest group represented - and refugees, those forced to across international borders.  "Terms such as climate migrants and climate wars have increasingly been used to describe displacement and conflict, however these terms imply that climate change is the main cause.
Life Sciences - Environment/Sustainable Development
24.04.2018
We still don’t know how strange celibate animals evolve
A new study has cast doubt on leading theory for how tiny creatures have evolved for tens of millions of years - without ever having sex. Most animals reproduce sexually, a process which shuffles genes from parent to offspring. This makes natural selection more efficient and allows animals to evolve defences against changing environmental conditions more rapidly, especially new diseases.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Agronomy/Food Science
24.04.2018
Early treatment for leg ulcers gets patients back on their feet
Treating leg ulcers within two weeks by closing faulty veins improves healing by 12% compared to standard treatment, according to new findings The research, led by Imperial College London and funded by the National Institute for Health Research , studied 450 UK patients with the most common type of leg ulcers known as venous ulcers.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Social Sciences
23.04.2018
Sense of control and meaning helps protect women from anxiety, study suggests
Sense of control and meaning helps protect women from anxiety, study suggests
People who feel in control of their lives and who find purpose and meaning in life are less likely to have anxiety disorders even when going through the toughest times, according to a study led by the University of Cambridge.
Environment/Sustainable Development
23.04.2018
Ocean warming can predict land warming with simple model
The temperature trend of continents can be estimated by measuring warming of nearby oceans, revealing a simple behaviour of the climate system. Researchers from Imperial College London and MIT have discovered a link between land and ocean temperatures that allows them to estimate land warming on the scale of continents.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
23.04.2018
Scientists identify genetic catalysts that speed up evolution of antibiotic resistance
Researchers at Oxford University have shown that it is possible to identify genetic catalysts that accelerate the evolution of antibiotic resistance in bacteria - and that this knowledge could be used to design treatments to stifle the development of resistance.  The study was funded by the Wellcome Trust and the European Research Council and is published in the journal Nature Ecology & Evolution .
Environment/Sustainable Development - Life Sciences
23.04.2018
Hungry birds as climate change drives food mismatch
Hungry birds as climate change drives food mismatch
Warmer springs create a mismatch where hungry chicks hatch too late to feast on abundant caterpillars, new research shows. With continued spring warming expected due to climate change, scientists, including experts at Durham University, say hatching of forest birds will be “increasingly mismatched” with peaks in caterpillar numbers.
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