Health - Nov 21
Mannose sugar, a nutritional supplement, can both slow tumour growth and enhance the effects of chemotherapy in mice with multiple types of cancer. This lab study is a step towards understanding how mannose could be used to help treat cancer. The results of the study today (Wednesday). Tumours use more glucose than normal, healthy tissues.
Health - Nov 21

The Mexican tetra fish can repair its heart after damage - something researchers have been striving to achieve in humans for years.

Health - Nov 21

Machine learning can help healthcare workers predict whether patients may require emergency hospital admission, new study has shown.

Life Sciences - Nov 21

Researchers at the University of Bristol have established greater evidence for a causal link between trauma in childhood and psychotic experiences at 18 years old.

Life Sciences - Nov 20

Scientists have equipped a virus that kills carcinoma cells with a protein so it can also target and kill adjacent cells that are tricked into shielding the cancer from the immune system.


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Health - Pharmacology - 19:06
Sugar supplement slows tumour growth and can improve cancer treatment
Mannose sugar, a nutritional supplement, can both slow tumour growth and enhance the effects of chemotherapy in mice with multiple types of cancer. This lab study is a step towards understanding how mannose could be used to help treat cancer. The results of the study today (Wednesday). Tumours use more glucose than normal, healthy tissues.

Health - Life Sciences - 16:03
Fish genes hold key to repairing damaged hearts
The Mexican tetra fish can repair its heart after damage - something researchers have been striving to achieve in humans for years. Now, new research funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) published in Cell Reports suggests that a gene called lrrc10 may hold the key to this fish's remarkable ability.

Life Sciences - 15:00
Psychotic experiences could be caused by trauma in childhood
Researchers at the University of Bristol have established greater evidence for a causal link between trauma in childhood and psychotic experiences at 18 years old. The findings, published today (21 November) in JAMA Psychiatry , are the first to comprehensively examine the association between different types of trauma, and their timing in childhood with later psychotic experiences using a large population study.

Health - 13:33
Machine learning can be used to predict which patients require emergency admission
Machine learning can help healthcare workers predict whether patients may require emergency hospital admission, new study has shown. Machine learning - a field of artificial intelligence that uses statistical techniques to enable computer systems to 'learn' from data - can be used to analyse electronic health records and predict the risk of emergency hospital admissions, a new study from The George Institute for Global Health at the University of Oxford has found.

Life Sciences - Earth Sciences - 20.11.2018
Modified virus used to kill cancer cells
Scientists have equipped a virus that kills carcinoma cells with a protein so it can also target and kill adjacent cells that are tricked into shielding the cancer from the immune system. It is the first time that cancer-associated fibroblasts within solid tumours - healthy cells that are tricked into protecting the cancer from the immune system and supplying it with growth factors and nutrients - have been specifically targeted in this way.

Earth Sciences - Life Sciences - 20.11.2018
Top ten universities for animal research announced
Top ten universities for animal research announced
Understanding Animal Research, an organisation promoting greater openness about animal research, has today released a list of the ten universities in the UK that conduct the highest number of animal procedures - those used in medical, veterinary and scientific research. These statistics are freely available on the universities' websites as part of their ongoing commitment to transparency and openness.

Life Sciences - 20.11.2018
Clean water linked to rising birth rates in Africa: calls for development initiatives to consider women’s reproductive services
A researcher from the University of Bristol presented research at Parliament yesterday that recommends the consideration of more holistic interventions in the world's poorest countries. An unintended consequence of water tap access in rural Ethiopian villages is population growth. The provision of a safe water supply increases child survival and improves women's health in these communities, but Dr Mhairi Gibson , a Reader in Anthropology at Bristol, has discovered a subsequent rise in child malnutrition as village resources are strained by a booming population.

Life Sciences - 20.11.2018
Sleep duration and TV viewing time linked to higher death risk, especially in poorer areas
People living in deprived areas are more vulnerable to the effects of unhealthy lifestyles, including previously unrecognised risk factors such as short or long sleep duration and long TV viewing time. In a new study led by the University of Glasgow and published today in The Lancet Public Health , researchers have shown that the association between an unhealthy lifestyle and death is stronger in the more deprived groups.

Earth Sciences - Life Sciences - 19.11.2018
A toxic bullet involved in bacterial competition found by researchers
A toxic bullet involved in bacterial competition found by researchers
A bacterial toxin that allows an infectious strain of bacteria to defeat its competitors has been discovered by Imperial College London scientists. The finding provides a better understanding of the mechanisms behind bacterial warfare, which is the first step for the design of improved treatments for microbial diseases.

Life Sciences - Earth Sciences - 19.11.2018
MDMA makes people cooperative, but not gullible
New research from King's College London has found that MDMA, the main ingredient in ecstasy, causes people to cooperate better - but only with trustworthy people. In the first study to look in detail at how MDMA impacts cooperative behaviour the researchers also identified changes to activity in brain regions linked to social processing.

Interdisciplinary / All Categories - 19.11.2018
Will algorithms predict your future?
A report from Cardiff University reveals the extent to which public service provision is now being influenced by data analytics. The study, Data Scores as Governance , represents the culmination of a year-long research project compiled by the School of Journalism, Media and Culture's Data Justice Lab.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 19.11.2018
Glucose binding molecule could transform the treatment of diabetes
Glucose binding molecule could transform the treatment of diabetes
Scientists from the University of Bristol have designed a new synthetic glucose binding molecule platform that brings us one step closer to the development of the world's first glucose-responsive insulin which, say researchers, will transform the treatment of diabetes. The World Health Organization estimate that over 382 million people worldwide, including 4.05 million people in the UK, have diabetes - a metabolic disorder affecting blood sugar levels.

Psychology - 19.11.2018
Friendship among young people in Wales
Friendship among young people in Wales
A good sense of humour is the most valued quality in a friend, research of young people in Wales has found. A team of Cardiff University researchers based at the Wales Institute of Social and Economic Research, Data and Methods (WISERD) found that honesty and kindness were the next most valued traits.

Continuing Education - 16.11.2018
Glass made from exploding stars
Glass made from exploding stars
The windows in are houses are quite literally allowing us to glimpse into the chaotic past of the Universe as new research has revealed that silica - the main component of glass - was originally formed inside the heart of exploding stars. In a new study, published in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society , an international team of scientists has detected silica in the remnants of two distant supernova billions of light years away from Earth.

Physics - Continuing Education - 16.11.2018
Finding rules in the chaos that could help reveal secrets of the Big Bang
New research has revealed that non-equilibrium quantum systems do obey universal laws, a discovery that can bring us closer to revealing the secrets of the Big Bang. Researchers from the University of Nottingham joined teams at the Technical University of Vienna and the University Heidenberg to undertake It shows that when quantum particles whirl around they obey universal laws, meaning what is true for one quantum system is also true for others.

Earth Sciences - Life Sciences - 16.11.2018
New way to look at cell membranes could change the way we study disease
Researchers have developed a new technique to analyse cell membrane proteins in situ which could revolutionise the way in which we study diseases, such as cancer, metabolic and heart diseases. The discovery was made as part of an international research collaboration, led by Oxford University, alongside peers including Imperial College London.

Earth Sciences - Life Sciences - 16.11.2018
Cells decide when to divide based on their internal clocks
The time of day, determined by a cell's internal clock, has a stronger influence on cell division than previously thought, reveals a new study. Cells replicate by dividing, but scientists still don't know exactly how they decide when to split. Deciding the right time and the right size to divide is critical for cells - if something goes wrong it can have a big impact, such as with cancer, which is basically a disease of uncontrolled cell division.

Literature / Linguistics - Environment - 16.11.2018
Laser technology uncovers medieval secrets locked in Alpine ice core
A new study has found ground-breaking evidence from an ice core in the Swiss-Italian Alps that proves the 7 th century switch from gold to silver currencies in western Europe actually occurred a quarter of a century earlier than previously thought. The findings, from the University of Nottingham and which are published in the journal Antiquity , will have major implications on the history of the European monetary system, and what we thought we knew about trade and the economy during this period.

Life Sciences - 16.11.2018
Friends and family increase the risk of children becoming smokers in the UK
Teenagers whose mothers smoked during pregnancy, or whose parents or friends smoke, are more likely to smoke themselves. The findings come from a new study carried out at Imperial College London and published today in the journal Thorax , which highlights caregivers and friends as key drivers of children trying and taking up cigarette smoking.

Earth Sciences - Life Sciences - 15.11.2018
New way to look at cell membranes could change the way we study disease
A new technique to study intact parts of cell membranes could revolutionise studies of cancer, metabolic and heart diseases. Membranes protect all of our cells and the organelles inside them, including the mitochondria - the powerhouse of the cell. These membranes are studded with biological machinery made of proteins that enable molecular cargo to pass in and out.
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