Postdoctoral Research Associate

     
EmployerUniversity of York
Archaeology
Published8 March 2017
Closing Date7 April 2017
WorkplaceYork, Yorkshire, UK
CategoryHistory / Archeology
Chemistry
PositionSenior Researcher / Postdoc

Description

Postdoctoral Research Associate


Role Description

We are seeking a Postdoctoral Research Associate in archaeological chemistry within the Department of Archaeology to participate in the ERC funded project “The Archaeology of Regime Change: Sicily in Transition (SICTRANSIT)”.

The object of SICTRANSIT is to understand the changes in agriculture, society and economy through the Byzantine, Arab and Norman periods in Sicily and their significance for the Mediterranean as a whole. You will use both well-tried and innovative methods to determine the contents of transported containers over the timespan and help explain why they changed and in what degree.

You will work in the state-of-the-art laboratories at BioArch within a community engaged in front-line research projects in archaeological science.

The post would suit candidates with research experience in analytical organic chemistry, biochemistry and archaeological research, specialising in some part of the last three thousand years. You are expected to have an appropriate PhD level qualification or equivalent experience commensurate with the job description for the post.

Informal enquiries may be made to Professor Martin Carver ( martin.carver [at] york[.]ac[.]uk ) or Professor Oliver Craig (oliver.craig [at] york[.]ac[.]uk).

The University of York is committed to promoting equality and diversity


Why York?

York is one of the most successful universities in the UK.

With world-class activity across the spectrum from the physical sciences, life sciences, and social sciences to the humanities, we have been recognised as one of the top 100 universities in the world, gaining outstanding results in official assessments of our research and teaching.

Web

In your application, please refer to myScience.org.uk
and reference  JobID 108676.